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Hack Racer
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2,559 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You guys have convinced me custom built is the way to go. Now the question:
Which stand do all of you enthusits/pros use to build wheels?

I have my eye on this one:
http://www.ultimatesupport.com/s.nl/it.A/id.1317/.f?sc=21&category=60
It's 79.99 CDN from Mountain equipment Co-op

Then there is this one:
Park TS-2 Professional Truing Stand
It is 180 USD, which is almost 3X the price of above
http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=16&item=TS-2

THere is also:
TS-8 Home Mechanic Wheel Truing Stand
It is 89.99 CDN from Mountain Equipment Co-op
http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=16&item=TS-8
 

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Derailleurless
Joined
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9,122 Posts
I currently use the Ultimate you linked to, and have been very happy with it. It's secure enough to hold my heavy-ass Speedhub wheels, with tires mounted, 29" even, without any problems. The plastic feeler gauges could be a little more precise, but as is they don't hamper my build. The included heavy cast base is nice for moving to different working areas, such as the coffee table in front of the TV. It also stores unobtrusively -- a point not to be overlooked.

I owned the Park TS-2 briefly. It's of super-heavy-duty construction and should be around long enough to will from generation to generation. Definitely shop quality. Disappointingly, the "self centering" feature really isn't, so flip-flop and/or a dishing gauge is still required (that's what ultimately led me to return it and purchase an Ultimate stand). Further, it does need to be mounted to something stable -- whether you bolt it to a 2x6 or clamp it to a workbench.

I've finally seen the new TS-8 you linked to. It looks interesting and certainly makes no pretense of self centering, which is refreshing. It does need to be secured to some sort of supportive base, and has no provision to tilt, but otherwise looks pretty solid and should be good for a home mechanic.

Regardless of what you end up with, provided it isn't made from wet noodles, you'll find the choice of workstand is damn near insignificant to the quality of your wheel builds. In fact, you will turn out perfectly solid, true wheels on the somewhat flexy Performance / Minoura truing stand often advertised in the $30 price range (I used one for a few years). Heck, a lot of guys on here will use a brake pad as a truing gauge with the wheel mounted in a frame turned upside-down, and you or I would never be able to tell the difference between what they produce versus what comes out of a $500 Park TS-3.

In that vein, be sure to set aside some cash for a few bottles of your favorite sipping brew, and be prepared to take your sweet time as you get familiar with twisting nipples and plucking spokes! Patience is the most important component when building up a wheel, and you certainly can't buy that.
 

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ravingbikefiend
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2,322 Posts
I also have a no cost version of the Ultimate stand and it works really well.
 

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Derailleurless
Joined
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9,122 Posts
Cheers! said:
Do you guys use a Tensiometer or do you just pluck and listen for a certain pitch?
I only picked up a tension meter and a dishing gauge recently. Neither are necessary. The tension meter only gets pulled out when I **think** I'm done. The dishing gauge is no more accurate than flipping the wheel in the truing stand.
 

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A wheelist
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5,991 Posts
Cheers! said:
Do you guys use a Tensiometer or do you just pluck and listen for a certain pitch?
After a lifetime (don't ask!) of wheelbuilding I have a "built in" tensiometer that works well enough. I use the pluck method to equalize tensions and you might find this article on musical spoke tension interesting.
 
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