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Anybody have any additional info about the supposedly soon-to-be-released TRP Spyke brakes? I haven't heard anything recently, and was wondering if anybody, maybe even someone from TRP, could address potential release dates. I really like my BB7s, but I am really curious abou these brakes. I'm definitely going to try them out.
 

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I just ordered a set, arriving Wednesday, I'll run them on my Tandem to start (replaces a set of Spyres). If they stop better/feel firmer than the Spyres, then I'll try them on my FS.

As far as I can tell, the Spyke is direct order only. $220 delivered, not cheap esp considering the they don't include levers or cables/housing.
 

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I just ordered a set, arriving Wednesday, I'll run them on my Tandem to start (replaces a set of Spyres).
Why replace Spyres with Spykes?

If they stop better/feel firmer than the Spyres, then I'll try them on my FS.
The only real difference between the Spyres and Spykes is they are made for different types of brake levers which have different amount of cable pull.

Spykes = v-brake levers / linear pull brake levers

Spyres = road brake levers, cantilever brake levers, bmx brake levers
 

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I am already running the Spyre's with Speed Dials and they feel spongy and weak, so the Spyke should feel better with the pull being matched.

If they feel as good as BB7s, I'll be satisfied, but I'm hoping they feel better :)
 

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I am already running the Spyre's with Speed Dials and they feel spongy and weak, so the Spyke should feel better with the pull being matched.
Speed Dials are 'long pull' levers, they aren't made to be used with the 'short pull' brakes you were using them on.

You should of been using cantilever brake levers with the Spyres.

A pair of cantilever brake levers would of been much cheaper then a pair of Spykes.
 

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I always find it interesting when people onm internet forums tell me things I already now...

So, because Speed Dials have an adjustable pull, they DO work with short pull calipers, they're just not ideal.

The reason I use Speed Dials is because they work better with the Spyres than the crappy TRP short BMX levers, of which have two sets and would gladly sell them to you.

Spykes shoudl be onthe doorstep when I get home today :)
 

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I always find it interesting when people onm internet forums tell me things I already now...
I have no idea what you know.

What's been written in this thread could be beneficial to someone, I'm sure that not everyone knows that certain combinations aren't 'ideal' or aren't really meant to work together.
 

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So any update on the Spyke NB?
 

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I got them installed on our Fandango mountain tandem, using Speed Dials, they set up easy, no alignment issues, the pull is much firmer than the Spyres; as expected. No ride impressions yet as we were out of town, but we should get a good ride in this week.

The Tandem works brakes about as hard as anything, so it's a good test bed. We ran the Spyres for the last year, they worked fair, but not ideal as there was a mismatch between the levers and calipers; they're little spongy. I could keep running the Spyres as they do work, but I was curious if the Spyke would be more powerful; I was getting arm fatigue on long downhills.

For the most part I prefer mechanical calipers as I feel they are better at modulation than most hydraulics, though at the cost of being less powerful. In the past the mechanical calipers were generally not as good of quality as hydraulics, even BB7s are just so-so quality, so the TRP Spyres (cross/road) and the Spykes (MTB) are a nice addition.

I also run Speed Dials/Spyres on my unis and they have been a great brake, surviving uncountable ground falls and rock shots. Unis use brakes much harder than an MTB.

The differences betwene the Spyre and Spyke: The Spyke has a dust shield covering the back of the pads (furthest from the rotor), the cable feed has a rubber sleeve to keep dust out of the housing, and they are slightly wider which seems to be the result of redesigning the arms so there is pad adjustment (via a an allen bolt through the middle of the outside arm).

I bought them direct, they come with a 160 or 180 rotor, $99 each plus shipping.

BB7s are less expensive for sure, esp if you buy direct from Taiwan, the question is whether the Spyke is going to be as powerful. I have a new set of BB7, so I may swap back and forth and see which I prefer. For the unicycles, where crank clearance is very tight, the Spyre/Spyke is the only mechanical brake that fits.
 

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Ordering one for the rear soon. Will be using them with Speed Dial 7's; though, these brakes can use Linear-pull v-brake style levers. Remember all the pretty levers there were when v-brakes were all the rage!

If they work well, I want to mix the calipers with these BOX Genius levers...

486095_Red.gif

Read the bottom of the clamp!
 

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Yeah, I have ridden them, I posted feedback above ^^^^^

They work great! I'm using Speed Dials, 200mm Hope Floating Rotors, the brakes are far more powerful than the Spyres, better than bb7, no problems locking up the rear wheel, no fade.
 

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Yeah, I have ridden them, I posted feedback above ^^^^^

They work great! I'm using Speed Dials, 200mm Hope Floating Rotors, the brakes are far more powerful than the Spyres, better than bb7, no problems locking up the rear wheel, no fade.
Get any rotor rub after initial set-up? Was setting the pads up for equal force/distance to the rotor easy?

Edit: My LBS has them in stock, so I'm getting one for the back to check them out.
 

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BB7's can be hard to align, the cones are a PITA. I also feel like the BB7 pads don't center well at times they seem "canted". I don't dislike BB7's, I have used them for many years; I still have a set in use while I wait for another set of Spykes to arrive, and until the TRP brakes the BB7's the better mechanicals if that was your bent.

The Spykes are a high quality mechanical brake, whereas BB7's are a "price break" component, the difference in fit and finish, function, all are why the Spyke/Spyre are so much more expensive.

The Spyke?Spyre are better than BB7's because they are smoother, easier to adjust, lower profile, and higher quality.

In the end, however, all brakes are simply mechanical devices that apply force to compress the brake pads against the rotors, so they are only as good as the pads and rotor. So picking a good quality rotor (I like Hope Floaters) and using the correct pad for your application (Metal, Semi Metallic, or Organic). The Spyke and Spyre use Shimano pads.

I prefer mechanicals over hydraulics because they have more feel and adjustability, they are also tougher and more easilly repaired on the fly/trail. Many people feel that mechanicals are second class brakes, but in contrast to some of the hydraulics I have used as of late (Magura, Shimano, Avid, Formula), I don't really think any of the new brakes are all that, though Shimano has done a good job on their most recent brakes (M series) and the new SRAM (AVID replacement) is getting good reviews.

The only "new" thing out there is the four piston brakes that use larger pads, such as the new Magura. A larger pad is going to provide more stopping power, but it will also increase friction and heat up faster.

Honestly, what we really need is a high powered braking system that use carbon pads and carbon discs... or we need really burly rotors and brakes that don't overheat (heavy!).
 

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Woot!

Got my order in for the rear...

The box and its plastic sleeve are sturdy, keeps the rotor from getting torqued. I couldn't wait to stab my knife through the sticker and cut it in order to slide the sleeve off, but there is not just one sticker, there are four holding the box in the sleeve... The inside of the box smells of new.

The Spyke caliper is very easy to set up, the instructions to do so are easy to follow. Not having to use conical washers is nice. Getting the caliper and rotor centered and true takes little time. I set them up connected to a Speed Dial 7, leverage adjuster is centered. The TRP 160mm(x 1.83mm/t) rotor I received is true and has a nice design to it.

Thanks to having a steep hill right near me, embedding took little time. After embedding, the brakes made a very different sound then what the BB7s do, the Spyke sounds like my friends hydros in operation. This is most likely do to how they operate: The Spyke has a similar concept to that of the hydros, to clamp the rotor, so if the caliper is set up properly you hear two pads putting near equal pressure to the rotor(I state "near equal", because there is no way to read the exact tension or depth in each piston to achieve an equal load, only way is with your eyes and your feelers). ANYWAYS, this brake sounds great when clamping down on the rotor, sounds and feels like it's doing its job, well too!

Embedded; off to the park hill where there are few short descending trails of different terrain. After a couple of adjustments to the caliper, if I wanted, I could lock the wheel and keep it locked until I let go(lever not hitting fingers). Two turns from seated on the brake lever barrel and the modulation seemed infinite. I want to try the BOX levers with this caliper. The BOX lever does not have the leverage adjustment like the Speed Dial 7, but after tinkering with setting modulation on the SD7+Spyke, I'm not so sure the leverage adjustment is important. Guess I wont know til I try the BOX lever?

You could compare the BB7 and Spyke, but in the end, they use different systems of operation, to were both most likely have their strengths and weaknesses. Though, I've only rode for an hour and a half after embedding the Spyke today and have yet to find a weakness in the Spyke caliper in combination with a bent SD7 lever.

I'm more than happy with the TRP Spyke disk brake system. I'll be getting another caliper and 180mm rotor for the front, and I'm ordering some Disco Brake pads after this posting.

Happy Trails!
 

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I have Spykes on a Fandango 29er and on two unicycles.

I previously used Spyres on the tandem and unis, they worked okay, the road throw was a little wacky which made the brakes feel spongy with Avid mtb Speed Dial levers, but they worked.

I upgraded to Spykes first on my solo bike, rode those for a year and they were just okay. I didn't like how the brake stopped when I was riding hard, they seemed to fade, so I changed to the Guides.

Strangely I have not had any fading issues with Spykes on the Fandango, so maybe it was a bad set of pads on the solo bike or I just needed bigger rotors??

On the unis the Spyres and Spikes work great, never had an issue with pad failure, fade, and for the most part they are squeak free when wet.

I like how the Spykes have a cover over the back side of the pad to keep out the grit, it's also nice to have some external pad adjustment like the BB's; though it takes an allen wrench to adjust them.

Alex at MTB Tandems is now offering Spykes as an option to the BB7's :)

I also run BB7 on my fat bike and they are equally effective, though they are little more plasticky and all those little ball and sockets are a PITA.
 
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