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A little clarity...

paintballeerXC said:
how much do trials bikes cost for like a beginner
what makes them different from other bikes
thanks
Assuming that you're talking about trialsin, what makes them different is that they're a specific purpose bike:

- Short stem
- Huge rise handlebars
- Raked out geometry
- Rigid
- Huge tires
- one small ring in front/a road cassette in back
- A tiny, tiny, tiny seat.
- Strong brakes

I couldn't tell you how much they cost.

Ken
 

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you can find used ones for $600 or so. look at the classifieds at
observedtrials.net
biketrials.com
trials-online.com

Beginners should not consider buying a trials bike. Beginner skills are easily learned on any mountain bike. Only when you progress to the point that you know trials is "the way" and you are prepared to forsake every other style of riding should you consider buying a trials specific bike. Otherwise it's a waste of you money.
 

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Stock bikes:
stem 110-120 mm
0 rise handlebars (29 inches wide)
steep steerer tube and long wheelbase
generally 2.2 or 2.3 in the rear (Michy DH comp 24.1 2.2 is a lot of folks faves)
moving towards single speed now because derailleurs suck
seats? Thats so 2002
solid braking comes from obsessed-over brakes and grinding the braking surface of the rim.
 

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Wrong!

nikolai said:


Stock bikes:
stem 110-120 mm
0 rise handlebars (29 inches wide)
steep steerer tube and long wheelbase
generally 2.2 or 2.3 in the rear (Michy DH comp 24.1 2.2 is a lot of folks faves)
moving towards single speed now because derailleurs suck
seats? Thats so 2002
solid braking comes from obsessed-over brakes and grinding the braking surface of the rim.
Me, that is. Nikolai obviously knows far more than I about trials. Listen to his advice.

Nikolai: I thought that in observed trials a seat and a derailer was required? Is this no longer the case?
 

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Ken in KC said:
I thought that in observed trials a seat and a derailer was required? Is this no longer the case?
The seat rule was phased out 5 or 6 years ago? I'm not certain when exactly that happened. On stock bikes, in all non-UCI United states competitions, a derailleur and working gears are not necessary. In NATS rules, they even combine Stock and Mod classes. That is not the case in UCI or BIU rules, but I think that in 10 years (the speed of change at UCI) gears will no longer be necessary on stocks.

If you are riding primarily for fun, what's the point in having a shifter or derailleur? It's lighter and simpler to have one speed. And now with a single speed drivetrain based on the White Industries freewheel, you can have the quick engagement of a King for a fraction of the cost.
 

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Thanks....

nikolai said:
The seat rule was phased out 5 or 6 years ago? I'm not certain when exactly that happened. On stock bikes, in all non-UCI United states competitions, a derailleur and working gears are not necessary. In NATS rules, they even combine Stock and Mod classes. That is not the case in UCI or BIU rules, but I think that in 10 years (the speed of change at UCI) gears will no longer be necessary on stocks.

If you are riding primarily for fun, what's the point in having a shifter or derailleur? It's lighter and simpler to have one speed. And now with a single speed drivetrain based on the White Industries freewheel, you can have the quick engagement of a King for a fraction of the cost.
Thanks for the education. I agree on the fun vs. equipment. I was only trying to get my learn on.

Ken
 
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