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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2017 9.8 Stache rigid with the 1120 fork that I am setting up for long gravel endurance rides with little elevation and climbing. I know, won’t be as fast as a actual gravel bike but Skinny tires gravel bikes look like a total disaster waiting to happen in this Florida sand. I am currently running a 32T chainring on the front and am looking for advice on what to use to obtain maximum speed. I’m perfectly okay losing the 11 speed non-eagle that the bike came stock with if necessary. I plan on keeping the flat bar for now however may change to drop bar monstercross style if necessary. Anyone have any experience going down to say a 8, 9 or 10 speed? 32T front still the max if so? Prefer SRAM drivetrain if that matters. I’ll appreciate any and all input.

Thank you in advance for the suggestions and help
 

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Not sure how much clearance the Stache has for chainrings, but easiest and simplest solution would be to swap rings, try a 34t, see if that gives you enough if it fits. If that's still not enough top end and you can fit a bigger ring, then go bigger, because when all's said and done, your smallest cog ain't changing to anything smaller to make it harder, so have to go bigger on the ring. If you will be doing lots of constant pedaling on flattish terrain, dropping to a more compact cassette could help by giving smaller jumps between gears shifts, which is why road bikes run such close ratios, lot easier on the legs.
 

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For Florida I would want the 11T (or even a 10T) so whatever you can get with either that fits your budget and weight desire. a 32 10T will give you more top end at same RPM than a 34 11T actually. All in all though they are very close and seems based on your original post might just want to keep what you have.
 

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I have a 2018 Stache 7. When the bike was built I swapped out the 28t it came with and went with a 30t. I'm not so much concerned with top end on the flat. One thing that Trek recommended however was not to go above 32t as you may get chain rub on the elevated stay especially in your climbing gears. May be a non issue in your case if you're in higher gears most of the time.
 

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I run 30 and 11-42 11 speed on my Krampus and it seems perfect for me. I am bringing the bike to Florida in August to hit Boyette and Alafia. I was supposed to have been down there in April but that trip got postponed to August so I cannot offer any first hand info yet but I've been down there a handful of times with my other bikes and there were no surprises.
 

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Such is the issue with a 1X drivetrain. Went 2x11 on my new Krampus. The answer is to use a bigger chainring. Maybe space out the drive side some? Or use a fatty crank to get some more clearance from the chainstay.
 

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Here's how I see it:

I think your bike has an 11 speed 10-42t cassette, so I'm basing my recommendations on that. That means your rear wheel has an XD driver currently.

Cheapest easiest option would obviously be to just mount a bigger chainring. I'm not familiar with the carbon frame, so I'm not sure how big of a ring you can mount. You could maybe go to the Stache thread on the Trek forum and see what others are running to see if it would work. a 34t or 36t chainring would get you a decent increase in speed. 2 issues you have to figure out when going to a bigger chainring. First is if the chainring will physically fit and not hit the chainstay/BB area. When buying a new ring, make sure to get a Boost spaced ring(that's assuming SRAM Direct mount cranks). You could maybe also try a BB30 flat ring, which will push the chainring out another 3mm and alighn it better with the smaller cogs. That might cause issues with chainline in the biggest cogs though. So if the chainring physically fits, then you have to figure out if it clears the bottom of the chainstay when in the biggest cog. If it does, you're good to go. If not, than you need to think about a cassette with a smaller big cog. I'm assuming that's why you're considering 9 or 10 speed cassettes? I've not investigated if anyone makes 11 speed cassettes with smaller big cogs, so go investigate that. Just remember that and cassette that runs on a normal Shimano freehub will only have an 11t small cog, which negates about a 3 tooth jump in chainring size.

So after a quick search, SRAM doesn't make any 11 speed cassettes smaller than 10-42. Sunrace only makes cassettes with 11t small cogs and they only mount to Shimano drivers, which means you would have to source a new freehub for your wheel.

The best options I found were from E*Thirteen. The make a couple of cassettes I think aimed at the DH market, a 9-34t and a 9-39t. They are not cheap at around $200, but still your cheapest option.

Going to a 9 or 10 speed setup will not get you what you're looking for. First issue is that all 9 or 10 speed cassettes use the normal Shimano freehub, which means they all have an 11t small cog. That means you would have to go to a 35t chainring to get back to the same ratio as with the current 32t chainring and 10t cog. You also have to buy new shifter, rear derailleur, freehub body, and cassette.
 

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Stache cannot use a 34t, unless you go with a small cassette out back for to chain hitting the elevated stay, as another poster mentioned. 34x11t is okay for gravel type rides as a Max, but you'll spin out sort of quick on the road. I think I max out around 25mph or so on it, with a 29x2.0 tire.

If you still intend to run a 3.0 tire in the back, it will add rolling resistance, but also give you higher top end speed due to the higher diameter.

If you can use an 11-34t cassette, or even a 11-32t, then you can probably run a 34t chainring, maybe even a 36? You'll need to do some trial and error though.

Sent from my Moto G (5) Plus using Tapatalk
 

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Maybe this is your affordable solution.
You put a 34 ring in front.
If i fallowed properly it fits.
B- You adjusts the screw of your rear derailleur to limit your cassette use to 9 speeds.
If your chain never goes on your 42 and 36 it should clear.
If it fits i think in 29 you can find a 3.2 tire to have a little gain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I appreciate all the suggestions. After some research and cost consideration, I have decided to build a 1X gravel drop bar bike that will have 45mm tires. Carbon rigid Stache for sale soon 😕
 

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Just out of curiosity, how much top-end would I lose dropping to a 28t (currently running a 30t)? I ask because I'm thinking of switching to the 28th Raceface ring it came with. Only reason is I'm kinda tired of looking at the green ring I have on there.
 

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Thanks for trying but I wouldn't have the slightest clue how to plug in what's needed. I'm sure for a lot of folks that is a great tool/resource.

I'm guessing the decrease is marginal at best. I know 2 teeth can make a difference. Just wondering how noticeable difference I might feel.

Thanks again 33rd
 

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Thanks for trying but I wouldn't have the slightest clue how to plug in what's needed. I'm sure for a lot of folks that is a great tool/resource.

I'm guessing the decrease is marginal at best. I know 2 teeth can make a difference. Just wondering how noticeable difference I might feel.

Thanks again 33rd
Technically 28 vs 30 will give about 7% difference so if you were at 20 multiply that by 0.93. But over 3 months you might adapt and be back to real close what you had.
 
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