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I am getting back into this sport after being away for years.....I still have my bike that I bought back in '96- Trek ST 120 for those that don't know, its the aluminum tube version of the Trek Y bike.

Specs are ...

RockShox Quadra 21 forks-modified with heavy duty springs
Fox Vanilla Rear
Shimano Deore LX derailers
Grip shift shifters....these suck BTW
Ritchey Clipless Pedals

This is not my bike, just one I found on the web...



My question is this for all you up to date bikers....

Suggestions for upgrades? I am open to everything.

Thanks.
 

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PedalDamnIt said:
Suggestions for upgrades? I am open to everything.

Thanks.
How passionate (wrong thread).

Anyway, there is no point in upgrading that... you don't want to fall into the "upgrade trap". You'll be better off buying a new bike. If you can't afford a new bike, just ride what you have for now and start saving.
 

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I honestly think you would have more fun on a new $500 HT than that bike. I had a 1995 Y frame and went to a Gary Fisher Marlin in 2005 and honestly I can say the ride was 200% better.
 

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ballbuster
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Yeah, second that

Call_me_Al said:
How passionate (wrong thread).

Anyway, there is no point in upgrading that... you don't want to fall into the "upgrade trap". You'll be better off buying a new bike. If you can't afford a new bike, just ride what you have for now and start saving.
I wouldn't sink any real money into upgrading it. Unified Rear Triangle bikes were pretty lame by today's standards. You're better off saving the dough for a modern bike.

Maybe I'm just a zealot, but IMHO, 29" wheels are where its at these days. Other's opinions vary, but personally, I'm so sold I'm going to sell off all my 26" stuff.
 

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pimpbot said:
I wouldn't sink any real money into upgrading it. Unified Rear Triangle bikes were pretty lame by today's standards. You're better off saving the dough for a modern bike.

Maybe I'm just a zealot, but IMHO, 29" wheels are where its at these days. Other's opinions vary, but personally, I'm so sold I'm going to sell off all my 26" stuff.
Yes, it sounds like a zealot to say 29 in wheels are where it's at if you don't know the rider or where and how they will ride.

I second that it's not a good idea to upgrade that bike much beyond something like chain lube or fixing a flat tire considering the performance and weight of inexpensive new bikes.

I would suggest trying different types of bikes as one builds or rebuilds some skills and fitness and sorts out the riding opportunities in their area.
 

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wanna dance?
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Agreed.

URT's made sense for the trends of that time, but those trends fell out of fashion quickly. Also, they were nearly all built around fairly crappy rear shocks. Note that the popular URT's of today benefit in no small way from stable platform rear shocks. It is interesting to ride one of those original URT frames fitted with a modern Fox rear unit. The designs with pivots closer to their BB's actually ride pretty nice. However, they're unfortunately built around that aggressive racing geometry we all used back then. In the time since, people have come to their senses, and realized that aggressive racing geometry is better left to custom bikes for racers. If you're not racing, you're better served by longer, more relaxed, stable, safer geometry. & even if you are racing, you may still benefit from this...

As you move forward in time, up until about 2000, each year brings pretty substantial improvements. Post-2000 the refinement has been much more gradual. Stepping off a 96 URT means a pretty big and pleasant surprise.

I'd advise saving that money, selling the Y to a high-school kid who needs a set of wheels, and test riding as many newer bikes as possible if you plan on actually putting some saddle time in off road.

If you want a soft squishy ride, get a full suspension bike. If you want an efficient, lightweight ride, get a hardtail or a rigid. Try 29" wheeled bikes too. They're the newest love/hate item, but you'll want to make that decision before you buy anything.

The original designer of Treks Y bike was a regular on these boards for some time. Even he wasn't a fan of the ride.
 

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ballbuster
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Uh, yeah...

bitflogger said:
Yes, it sounds like a zealot to say 29 in wheels are where it's at if you don't know the rider or where and how they will ride.

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... that's why I qualified it with a big fat 'IMO' and 'Other's opinions vary'. I'm just saying it's wroth trying out. In my case, I liked it so much better I almost never ride my $3k -ish Stumpjumper or any of my 4 other 26" bikes in favor of my $800-ish Redline Monocog 29er.
 

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PedalDamnIt said:
RockShox Quadra 21 forks-modified with heavy duty springs
Fox Vanilla Rear
Shimano Deore LX derailers
Grip shift shifters....these suck BTW
Ritchey Clipless Pedals
Ooof. Sorry to say I wouldn't salvage a single thing.

Now for the good news: new bike time!
 
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