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Weiner Dog Connoiseur
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I'm doing my winter overhaul on my '05 Fuel 70, which has been continuously upgraded so that only the frame, shifter pods, saddle and seat post are left from the original purchase.

I've got the rear shock off (which I upgraded to a Cane Creek Cloud 9 instead of the miserable Rock Shox Bar). How easy should it be to move the rear triangle without the shock? The triangle moves smoothly throughout the range of travel, but it seems to take a fair amount of effort to move it.
 

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occupation : Foole
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SaxMan said:
How easy should it be to move the rear triangle without the shock? The triangle moves smoothly throughout the range of travel, but it seems to take a fair amount of effort to move it.
Well, the words "fair amount of effort" are rather subjective .....beings that the older Fuels swingarm uses bushings instead of bearings (am assuming your '05 has bushings ???), there is more inherent friction with said design. I've had my rear shock off on my older Fuel ('01), and, yeah, it's not "free swinging." by any means. I'd imagine bearings would move/pivot easier, I guess Perhaps your bolts are over-torqued ? Check 'em with a torque wrench, as having them cranked too tight would not help....Have you ever had your bushings replaced ? The "effort" you speak of is likely part of the reason why Fuels seem "firm" as opposed to "plush" (not to mention the swingarm having to flex in place of another pivot point). I'd guess yours is fine, but I'd double check with a torque wrench to be sure it's up to spec,
Good luck
- F
 

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Kick Start My Heart
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Fair Amount?

Like Fuelish said, "fair" is tough to equate. However, I can tell you this: Right after I had my rear triangle replaced, I had a squeak from the rear of my ride, (it sounded like I was riding a haunted house!), and to narrow it down I removed the rear shock and swung the rear on it's own. It took a little force, almost like just enough to start flex on your arm, and then smooth progression through the motion. When I took it in to have the squeak repaired, (a piece of loctite in the bushing), I asked them and they said it felt normal. I think bearings back there would be cool and plush, but some resistance seems to be the norm.
Can't hurt to check torque @ a minimum, pull and clean (do not lube!), or just go all out and replace since you are doing an annual tear-down.
Davez
 

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Yeah, I would say that a "fair" amount of effort is normal. I have replaced the bushing sets on several fuels and have built up several new frames that didn't have the rear shocks installed. One brand new carbon frame I built up once took a significant amount of force to cycle the linkage back and forth, upon inspection everything looked fine. It just seems to be the nature of the bushing system that Trek uses for that bike. And, the newer Fuel EX models that have bearings instead cycle smoothly and freely with virtually no effort. The bushing vs. bearing debate is far from settled in the bike industry but comparing these two bikes it's easy to see why Trek went to bearing pivots...
 
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