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I am now subject to the Hip Prohibitions that all lucky hip replacement patients face. One of the three prohibitions is that the angle between the upper leg and the torso must remain 90degrees or more. That is, I cannot bring my leg up towards my chest without untold dire consequences - like the hip implant pulling out of the bone its in.

That makes the drops on my road bike pretty useless because it instantly violates this one of the three hip prohibitions. I would like to convert this bike to horizontal bars and put the larger tires ( 1 1/4) back on that I previously used for bike touring trips.

I have no idea what length of stem and bars to use and what height to set the bars at. I will not replace the rigid fork. This bike is an old custom (Tanaka) frame bike and I will retain the old rim brakes and rigid fork. I would like to use the bike for unpaved bike paths, farm roads, and other non-challenging rides. For tougher stuff, I have a few mountain bikes to use.

Has anyone else done this? Any advice as to fit and riding position?

Thanks in advance. Keep riding.
 

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I'm a technical rep for several joint replacement companies and have been in on thousands of hip replacements and revisions. I've never heard of the cup pulling out. The bone grows into the porous coating and creates an extremely tough bond. In fact it's a pita to get one out for a revision. Sometimes screws will be used also.
What can happen is a dislocation but if the doc knows you're active he probably used a high wall plastic insert to prevent that. If you're a normal sized human, the ball, or head is probably 40mm or at least 36mm which prevents dislocations. Back in the day, a standard size was 28mm and dislocations were common.
On the stem side I've never seen a catastrophic failure. I've seen an implant break at the neck and I've seen loose implants in the femur. These days it's rare to use cement and go with a press fit but that's up to the doc.
 

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Aside from not using drops do you feel the need to change anything else? That will give you insight more on the stem than bars. I like wider than recommended bars on my mtbs so i suggest get a nice wide bar and slowly move in your cockpit, about 10 mm per side, or even just 5mm if you are patient. if you like it better, cut down the excess bars. rinse, repeat until you find your preferred width. Stem can be a little tricker but id guess shorter will be better for your situation. Luckily stems are cheaper than bars but then again can’t be modified. Maybe a friend or friendly shop will have a few spares you can try.
 

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The top tube of a road bike is really too short for flat bars to work well. You can do the conversion but it won't be great. The best solution is to just ride a mountain bike on the road. If you have many bikes, you can devote one of your mountain bikes to be your "flat bar gravel bike", e.g. a hardtail (or fully rigid) 29er with 35-51mm tires (i.e. up to 2.0 inch or so). You can experiment with bars--either narrowish conventional bars around 625mm, or one of the various touring styles. If you want to keep riding the road bike for sentimental reasons, then I'm sure there are tons of conversion stories out there, it just doesn't work as well as we'd like it to.
 

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The top tube of a road bike is really too short for flat bars to work well. You can do the conversion but it won't be great. The best solution is to just ride a mountain bike on the road. If you have many bikes, you can devote one of your mountain bikes to be your "flat bar gravel bike", e.g. a hardtail (or fully rigid) 29er with 35-51mm tires (i.e. up to 2.0 inch or so). You can experiment with bars--either narrowish conventional bars around 625mm, or one of the various touring styles. If you want to keep riding the road bike for sentimental reasons, then I'm sure there are tons of conversion stories out there, it just doesn't work as well as we'd like it to.
I don’t have much experience with this. Can you speak more to how flat bars are different than riding on the narrow flats of a curvy bar? As you can see i dont know the technical name for that spot, i just know its above the hoods. I recently put a surly open bar on my fixed gear bike to get a slightly wider reach. I haven’t ridden the setup enough yet for a long term review but like the feel so far.
 

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While you can ride on the flat part of drop bars, most people have the bike set up so that the most comfortable position is to ride with your hands on the brake lever hoods. So measuring out from the head tube, you have the length of the stem plus the length of the curved portion of the bars that projects forward plus the length of the hoods themselves. This is a lot of distance forward from the head tube, compared with a modern MTB, which has maybe a 40mm stem. Now it's true that your bars are much wider on an MTB, but to get to a similar position with a road frame, you need some pretty narrow bars, and a long stem. It can be done, lots of people have done it, but a frame made for flat bars (e.g. a hybrid or flat bar road bike) has a longer top tube than a frame made for drop bars. Here's a brief article on how it can be "done right"--I personally don't think it's worth doing, but it can be done:
 
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