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Don't do it. It is So not worth it.

Last Sunday while I started a ski I noticed my throat was scratchy, I ignored it and did a good hard 3hrs skate ski (I know I am brilliant). Sure enough on monday I was sick. Took it easy tuesday, did a light trainer ride and on Wednesday went out for a ski in -18C weather. Thursday comes and I am really, really sick. It is saturday and I am still not moving much. Probably be Tuesday before I do any exercise again.

Now if I had just backed on last Sunday I would probably perfectly heathly right now.
 

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I just trained through most of Base 2 with a mild but persistent cold. With two kids in grade school, it's inevitable I'll come down with something this time of year. As long as there's no fever or deep cough, I'll continue low intensity training. My 1st "A" race is in 3 mos, with four prep races before then. I need to get to some higher intensity work soon, or I won't be ready.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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I think I get better faster if I'm active. But not LMN active. :) Maybe rides of an hour or so, and not pushing myself to where I have to breathe hard - just enough to keep my body ticking over and my immune system on its feet.
 

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Ride Good or Eat Wood
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A mate did a hard road session when sick, got a bit dizzy part of the way through came off his bike at high speed and woke up in the ER. Still suffering 6 months post accident. I think you just need to listen to your body and give it a rest when sick.
 

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Some years ago when I extensively used a heart rate monitor to train I also used it every morning to check my resting heart rate.

It was curiosity.... learning about my body.

Every day it was around 48-50, rare days 42-45 bpm.

One morning it was 65. I felt great.... no sniffles, no stress, no nothing.
I thought "What the?" Two days later I had a cold... a good one too.

I had the same thing a few months later as well. Same figure too... 65 bpm

It's not much of a test but it goes to show our heart and body know what's going on before we do. The thing is when we know in advance we can ease or stop training for a bit.

It's well worth using one just for that. and when money permits I'll be getting another.
 

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ireland57 said:
Some years ago when I extensively used a heart rate monitor to train I also used it every morning to check my resting heart rate.

It was curiosity.... learning about my body.

Every day it was around 48-50, rare days 42-45 bpm.

One morning it was 65. I felt great.... no sniffles, no stress, no nothing.
I thought "What the?" Two days later I had a cold... a good one too.

I had the same thing a few months later as well. Same figure too... 65 bpm

It's not much of a test but it goes to show our heart and body know what's going on before we do. The thing is when we know in advance we can ease or stop training for a bit.

It's well worth using one just for that. and when money permits I'll be getting another.
i don't test my resting HR, but the same thing has happened while training and racing. have had a very high ave HR while racing (much higher than normal), along with a poor race performance, was left wondering why? - next day BAD cold. ahhhh, I was getting sick...

anyway - rest up, get better.
 

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I hear your pain. When I get sick I still train, but I only do inside training (Bicycle on rollers). I have had the same exact problem before, coming in from skiing and becoming sick. Just drink a lot of Redbull, you'll be fine. :D
 

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As soon as I know I'm sick, I attack the sickness with rest.

When I get home from work, straight to bed, lights out. 2-3 days of that and I'm training again by the 3rd or 4th day.

When in doubt, rest hard!! (and drink a shot of Snapps before bed).
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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sucks

stillhardtailing said:
I just trained through most of Base 2 with a mild but persistent cold. With two kids in grade school, it's inevitable I'll come down with something this time of year. As long as there's no fever or deep cough, I'll continue low intensity training. My 1st "A" race is in 3 mos, with four prep races before then. I need to get to some higher intensity work soon, or I won't be ready.
I'm with you. Any cold that my son brings home does the following:

He is sick for a week = no sleep for me.
My daughter catches it and is sick for a week = no sleep for me.
My wife catches it and is sick for a week = no sleep for me.
After 3 weeks of no sleep, my immune system crashes and I am sick for a month.

After years of racing sick or losing entry fees, I'm no longer racing until June and the gauntlet has passed. It's just too hard for me to do those march/april/may races with the armor plated baby germs floating around:madman:
 

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I have found that when I push myself through workouts when I am sick it tends to come down on me much harder. However, in the same manner, I tend to get over it quicker and loose less fitness then if I had taken a break when I felt it first coming on and let the sickness meander through it course. To each their own though. Especially when family and children are involved.
 

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When I get sick I have to rest, rest, and rest some more or i'll be down for weeks. No easy training even. I end up off the bike 5 days with a cold and 10 with the flu. Of course through most illness I end up with a sinus infection tagged onto the end of it, and in that case I may be off the bike 2 weeks!!! Gotta love underlying allergy problems..........
 
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