Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,472 Posts
Don't go too hard or too long the week before a big endurance race. Relax.

One week before the event is too late to gain anything significant, other than a nice, deep reservoir of fatigue!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,094 Posts
The week before a (more important) race: riding flow trails with my wife or visiting the next bikepark (lift shuttle!) with my buddies
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
748 Posts
Yep, I try to rest up the week before, but not get soft. Easy, recovery pace rides that aren't that long. Plenty of sleep and fluids. Make sure to back off on the calories a bit too, since you aren't putting in the same training volume your fuel demands are reduced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
861 Posts
No worries, just ride the race. 90% of how you do is your genetics; 5% is your "training". 4% is your mindset; .9% will be luck. The final 0.1% is what you do or don't do this week.

I never do anything "special" prior to a race. Just do a "normal" week. Don't kill yourself in training but don't let yourself become stale. Make sure you fiddle with any bike issues well ahead of the race day.

On race day have fun! Let us know how it goes for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,472 Posts
90% of how you do is your genetics; 5% is your "training". 4% is your mindset; .9% will be luck. The final 0.1% is what you do or don't do this week.
In an mtb event that includes significant single track, I would disagree pretty strongly with the "90%" genetics part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
I had the flu for about 10 days before my 24 hour solo this year. I thought for sure my race was wrecked. I did not turn a pedal or do anything the entire time. I woke up feeling better on race day and had a great race that exceeded even my most optimistic goal. I attribute that to being well rested and mentally committed. Rest rest rest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
No worries, just ride the race. 90% of how you do is your genetics; 5% is your "training". 4% is your mindset; .9% will be luck. The final 0.1% is what you do or don't do this week.

I never do anything "special" prior to a race. Just do a "normal" week. Don't kill yourself in training but don't let yourself become stale. Make sure you fiddle with any bike issues well ahead of the race day.

On race day have fun! Let us know how it goes for you.
This is ridiculously wrong. Obviously never been in any high level competitive sports before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I'll be racing next Saturday and it's business as usual.
Work, ride easy to moderately, eat well and sleep well.
No changes to bike or diet.
 

·
washed-up moto guy
Joined
·
237 Posts
As previously stated, it all depends on the race itself. I use the TSS (training stress score) metric to monitor my training load and generally my volume is decreased from a build week by somewhere around 50% the week before a targeted event. However, that is generally preceded by a two to four week taper depending on the event and how long I have been training for the event.

One thing that I have found to be important is to not reduce the intensity of your workouts in the same proportion that you would decrease the duration. For example, if you are putting in your work outside, don't shy away from a tough training loop, but just do less of those loops overall. Or if you are using a power meter or working indoors, keep high intensity intervals at the same target, just do less of them.

I think the most important thing is to not go into a race overworked. Whether that be mentally or physically, take some time to care of yourself!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,865 Posts
I've had good luck maintaining some intensity, mostly "speed" type riding; i.e. high cadence, low force. Mostly just getting out for 45 minutes at lunch and riding some fast windy singletrack.

I prioritize sleep over training time, and shift my diet to a little bit higher carbohydrate intake in the 3 days before the race.
 

·
Registered Dietitian
Joined
·
1,686 Posts
No worries, just ride the race. 90% of how you do is your genetics; 5% is your "training". 4% is your mindset; .9% will be luck. The final 0.1% is what you do or don't do this week.
I don't think I've read a more inaccurate statement on MTBR, and that's saying something.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top