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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I found out earlier this week that I am diabetic. No suprise really since I'm 6-2 270 lbs and everyone else in my family is diabetic.

Anyway, this news has got me re-focused on losing weight, increasing my cardio capabilities, and doing some mtb racing.

My question is, how does diabetes affect my training? Really as far as eating is concerned. Do I need to alter my ratio of carbs/fat/protein to protect my blood sugar levels?

Any good reading recommendations on the subject would be appreciated.
 

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Some infomation for ya....

Dave In Florida said:
I found out earlier this week that I am diabetic. No suprise really since I'm 6-2 270 lbs and everyone else in my family is diabetic.

Anyway, this news has got me re-focused on losing weight, increasing my cardio capabilities, and doing some mtb racing.

My question is, how does diabetes affect my training? Really as far as eating is concerned. Do I need to alter my ratio of carbs/fat/protein to protect my blood sugar levels?

Any good reading recommendations on the subject would be appreciated.
Since you just found out that you are diabetic, you probably have a lot of questions. A good place to start gathering information can be found at: http://www.type1rider.org/
It's a great website... a wealth of info on diabetes and mountain bike racing.

There is some valuable info in these previous threads at mtbr about diabetes and racing/riding:

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=277284

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=403838

http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=395277

I was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic 7 years ago at age 44. I had an older brother who developed diabetes at age 5. He died at age 40 due to diabetic complications. After having had first hand experience with my brother's illness, I was determined to not develop any of the health complications that affected him.

I have found that the best way to control my blood sugar is to check it as often as possible. I check at least 10 to 15 times a day....and adjust from there. I even check it at least once a night after I go to sleep. When I ride, I check within the first 30 minutes after starting ...then at least every hour after that.

Were you diagnosed with type 1 or 2? What about the rest of your family...are they type 1 or 2?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the links. I definitely will begin studying.

I was diagnosed Type2. My grandmother, both parents and sister are also type2.

I honestly believe we are genetically predisposed to these issues. I eat the same things my wife eats. Her cholesterol and blood sugar levels are normal. My cholesterol is high, my blood sugar was hovering in the 3-400 range and my tryglicerides are 3300 on a scale of 1-150 (no, that's not a typo). My sisters were close to 10,000 at one point.

The good news though is even after the holiday weekend and two family members dying last week (and the food that goes with that) my blood sugar was 255 when I woke up this morning. So just cutting out some snacks and eating a bit smarter has already dropped my blood sugar a good amount.

Thanks again for the links!
 

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Hey Dave, I bet this was a bit of an alarm bell for you - tough break - genetics were not kind to you but you can make a difference!

As a newly diagnosed person with diabetes, you will be learning a lot of new things in the times to come. I am in Canada so your numbers are pretty meaningless to me (US uses different units compared to everywhere else in the world) but the lipid numbers sound pretty dramatic!

I would ask your doctor if the medications you have been put on (if any) can cause hypoglycemia. A typical starting medication might be something like metformin, which does not cause hypoglycemia, so you don't have to worry about that even if you are training. There is no special diet for athletes vs. diabetic patients vs. diabetic athletes - a well balanced diet is the way to go for everyone. The Canadian Diabetes Association website has tonnes of good diet info in case the American Diabetes Association doesn't.

If you are doing primarily zone 2/ endurance exercise, which is greatest for burning fat and losing weight, then eat a well balanced diet - no need to have extra carbs over a non-athlete.....

Finally, soliciting advice and info over the internet is useful food for thought, but I would go see a registered dietician in addition to your doctor - possibly the best thing you can do for your health!
 

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Dave,

Sorry to hear about your recent diagnosis. I also found out I was type 2 this year in May. Your attitude towards controlling the disease is awesome. I've tried to do the same thing by looking at this as an opportunity to stay more focused on exercise and diet.

Here's a little bit of what I have figured out over the past few months:


What I have found is that a simple 30 minute walk will bring my blood sugar levels down 30 - 40 points. I put on some headphones and take the dog for a nice walk through the neighborhood...

When I ride, I usually bump my blood sugar up to about 170 (I'm normally around 113), it will go down within the first 25-30 minutes to around 100, but the strange thing is that it actually will be around 125-135 after the ride, at least in my case, when I get below 100 my liver will dump some glucose to raise it back up. (This is a good time to satisfy your craving for something sweet, you're going to work it off pretty quickly.)

You may start to feel shaky as your start bringing your BS down below 150, your body has adapted to operating at 300+ so it's really bonking. After about a month or so your body will adapt to the lower levels.

Eat protein with your carbs.

If you start craving sweets, eat a little bit....let me stress a little bit. I have a single bite size piece of dark chocalate almost every day at 4 pm.

PM me if you have any questions. I'm no expert, but I'm going through this a few months ahead of you and will share anything I can. Diabetes is a big deal if you don't manage it correctly, but it is very managable.

Jay
 

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There was a kid racing for Team Type 1 in local races this year; not sure if he's a Type 1 or Type 2 (I'm not sure how that works), but he was riding very well and he had an insulin pump "patch" on both of his arms.

He obviously trained through this challenge and leads a semi-normal life; I have every bit of confidence that you can, too. Work at getting your weight down and lead a healthy lifestyle, and you'll see a difference.
 
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