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Wicketed
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I love my Turner Flux, but for various reasons I'm thinking of making a change and an Alum Yeti ASR is at the top of the list (the new dw flux is just a bit too heavy for my needs).

The bike would be used for XC racing and enduro racing, as well as long fast trail days. I'd really like a bike with a bit more responsive pedalling action, though I loved the handling and downhill ability of the Flux.

Has anyone ridden both who could offer an opinon?
Cheers.
 

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You are posting in the yeti sub-forum, so you must be looking for someone to tell you just to do it, if you wanted to be talked out of it you would post on the turner sub-forum, so do what you want and get the ASR
 

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I had a Flux too, raced it (and everything else) but wanted something a bit more racey and, as you say, responsive. I built up a lightweight, super stiff alu hardtail, but to make a long story short, it doesn't cut it (for me) for all types of racing, a great tool to have though.. So back to the drawing board, the Flux needed to meet the hardtail and make babies. I tried a friend's ASR-SL and while it is a great bike, I find its suspension action to be much like the Flux' and in general I find them to have very similar traits, which is perhaps not too surprising. In other words, you will get a frame that is somewhat lighter and somewhat less stiff in the rear end, but I don't think you will find what you're looking for.

If you really want something that pedals better, DW-link should be the ticket, but it is true that the new Turners are indeed somewhat heavy (and expensive) - I already have an impeding sense of doom for that statement ;-)
Anyways, for me, the new Flux was definitely on the list of the potential outcome of the breeding project, ultimately I decided against it, mostly because I wanted something with a slightly more aggressive geometry. I ended up buying the Giant Anthem X, the suspension system is much like the DW-link and it really, really works, it darts nicely forward under acceleration and provides bob-free pedaling without the need for excessive platform, plenty of reviews are around, geometry is more race-oriented and it is slightly more twitchy than the Flux.. Admittedly, the Giant is not half as sexy as the Turner or Yeti, which is a tough one to swallow. While I have no hesitations to use the Anthem X for all day epics or long endurance events, the cheaper frame offered me the opportunity to buy a Yeti 575 as well for play-bike duty, but that is another story..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
rasmusj - thanks that's a really helpful response. What you wrote about is exactly why I haven't pulled the trigger on the asr i.e. that the frames might be fairly similar in terms of suspension action. There's no point me spending out money for a minor change in performance. unfortunately my local bike shop only has a demo 575 so i'm unable to test-ride the asr - hence the question i posted.

those new anthems look absolutely fantastic - i'll have to see if i can find a ride on one.
 

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2008 asr

Swan,
I'm the perfect guy for your question. JUST got a 2009 Epic S-Works and I own a 2008 ASR. The ASR had/has way to much normal rider pedal input and really cant be tuned out. The fox RP23 doesn't lock out and to lock the fork you are continuously reaching down to lock and unlock. Bottom line the Yeti is very comfortable all day and I never felt handicapped untill I rode the new Epic, it climbs at a different level than anything else other than a FULL rigid bike, but like the other poster said this is a Yeti forum so? . If your a Yeti guy its hard not to be one always, I still ride my 96 ARC hardtail with a 98 judy on it. Decisions, Decisions. ASR 24.5# S-Works 22#
Cheers,
Chipolopolo
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Nice one, Chipo - thanks for the info. I know manufacturers' forums can be a bit partisan, as gjknorr suggests above, but you and rasmusj have given really balanced responses.
Guess I'll start looking further afield for the new race bike. Maybe an ARC, and keep the flux for longer rides :)
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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?

Not much luvin for the ASR today. I think it will be a very similar bike to the Flux. Not that that's a bad thing. The ASR does feel a bit racier to me, but not by a huge margin.

I don't have trouble with bob. I run at 15% sag and propedal in 3, and my oversized legs can't make it bob at all unless standing and hammering. I found the Anthem and Flux to have more bob, but likewise to be more active/smoother over rough terrain while locked.
 

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15% sag??

Used2bhard...you only set at 15% sag? I've been running 30%. Does the rear end chatter out on descents at 15%?

What sag do you set on your fork?

And btw...the asr-sl is the only bike I have ever ridden where the front wheel stays absolutely planted while climbing steep grunts. I just let my upperbody go neutral and pedal up a wall of roots, ruts and rocks. Straightest climber I've thrown a leg over.
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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Nope

ibrown said:
Used2bhard...you only set at 15% sag? I've been running 30%. Does the rear end chatter out on descents at 15%?

What sag do you set on your fork?

And btw...the asr-sl is the only bike I have ever ridden where the front wheel stays absolutely planted while climbing steep grunts. I just let my upperbody go neutral and pedal up a wall of roots, ruts and rocks. Straightest climber I've thrown a leg over.
I used to run the typical 25%, but it just felt too soft and not responsive enough. Now I alternate between 15 and 20 depending on conditions and it works like a charm. Normally I run 155psi at my 170 lb (dripping wet) weight. If I'm on something smooth and fast I'll throw in 160psi, something really rough 150psi. It'll chatter if my rebound is too high. I like it at 4 clicks out of the 7. I will unlock the RP23 for all extended descents.

Up front, I like the recommended 25%. I have always run a remote lockout so I don't mind it being a little soft. I lock it out whenever I stand, or if I need a burst of power over a really short steep hill. With the blackbox damping/motion control, the fork won't bob any other time.

I love the way the front stays down. I really struggled with that on other bikes. On my 575 I felt like I had the seat nose up my bumhole half the time!
 

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Titus Racer X or the Motolite. Both are racier than the Yeti, climb great and very responsive to peddle input; they rocket out of turns especially the racer X. I own the Yeti ASR-SL and a Racer X, I ride the racer X all the time and the Yeti has become my back-up. The Yeti is more plush and has more peddle induced bounce; the Racer X is like a hardtail with a shock. If you ride really tight trails then nothing will beat the Racer X in the turns or climbing! The Yeti is a fantastic bike also but not as racey.
 

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"The Yeti is more plush and has more peddle induced bounce; the Racer X is like a hardtail with a shock"

my ridding buddy has a racer x and we are both the same size. We occasionally swap bikes and he wishes he had the yeti, especially when the trail points up. I have my rp23 set at 3 and I never get any bob.
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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I've got the same situation with a friend. I can understand love for the RacerX Its an amazing bike, but the Motolite is "racier" comment had me laughing.
 

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Rear shock is the Fox RP23 however the Yeti is a 2008 version and the racer X is the 2007 version. The biggest difference between version that I can tell / see is the air valve steam position and size. The Yeti rear triangle is not as stiff as the Racer X.
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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Stiff

axo0oxa said:
Rear shock is the Fox RP23 however the Yeti is a 2008 version and the racer X is the 2007 version. The biggest difference between version that I can tell / see is the air valve steam position and size. The Yeti rear triangle is not as stiff as the Racer X.
I do agree about the stiffness. I wonder if you have some playing to do with the pressure in your shock on the Yeti. At equal sag, I found the Racer-X to have a bit more bob and be a bit more active. I like it for a rooty/rolling hill type bike, whereas the Yeti seemed to be more responsive.

You own both so you have good saddle time on each. My Racer X experience was limited to about a dozen rides.
 

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One last comment, cause I know this is a Yeti site and I own one which is why I visit the site; both Yeti and Titus make fantastic race ready bikes. They both are beautiful, well thought out, and first class fabrication. They each have their own character and when you adjust to one getting on the other takes some time to readjust. You can't go wrong buying either one however if you can ride each one for some time then you might find one more desirable over the other because it fits your body and riding style and temperament just a little bit better than the other. On the Yeti you feel like you are sitting on top of the bike and on the Titus you don't have as much of that perched on top feeling. The Yeti smooths out the trail much nicer than does the Titus but the Titus rails the tight twisties quicker. The rear on the Yeti definitely flexes more. Someone ask me to test the two up against a wall by pushing the peddle down with force with the bike 90 degrees to the wall. As I torqued the peddle down the Yeti's rear twisted slightly. The Titus did also but no where near as much. Is this a real world test, no, but it did show me the Titus rear end is noticeable more flex free. Neither bike is flexy though when riding them. The Horst rear on the Titus is a fantastic set up, you have to ride one to really appreciate it. I love both bikes and wouldn't get ride of either.
 

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axo0axo,

I certainly agree w/you that the yeti flexes more laterally. I notice it when I ride the streets w/ the bike. Never noticed it on the trail though. I come from a Intense Tracer w/ the horst link (same as racerx) and when i finally broke my tracer, the choices for me were either the racer x or the asr. I was initially worried about being a on single pivot type bike but the RP23 is amazing here. Supposedly though (I have never seen this in action), the carbon chain stays of the asr are supposed to flex right where the horst link pivots are. My friends race x weights a couple more lbs than my yeti so it might not be a fair comparison, but I feel that my yeti is a much more lighter bike to handle and much quicker. On long technical Northeast races I do miss my tracer as I get more beat up on the yeti, but other wise, I would never go back. I can't just roll over stuff w/ the yeti, and have to be a little more carefull about picking my lines. Also, it has been said in all the comments about the yeti, but I now can climb stuff on the yeti there was no way I made it up on other bikes. What you call perched :) I call well balanced. I am always amazed that I can go from sitting to standing to sitting again on really steep stuff and never loose traction...

Anyways, this is an argument between great and great!

I do wonder though if you should add a couple of psi to your shock if you are getting motion back there when pedaling because mine is as stiff as a hard tail even standing...
 

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Back to Yeti v. Turner, is geometry of either the Flux or ASR better suited for a rider with longer torso and shorter legs (e.g., at height 5' 10")?

I read once that Yeti's fit those with longer legs better, in general. Any truth to that?
 

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I've got a question or thought....
It was my understanding the Carbon ASR has a stiffer rear end than the previous models and overall was a stiffer frame....
were the same changes made to the alumin. ASR? or is this a carbon benefit?

other question
....I understand you can cut off the entire mast seatpost on the carbon and run a Thompson or other regular seatpost? how does this work? how would the regular seatpost be clamped? pics anyone?

any of you with the ASR's 08/09's what is the drop measurement from your saddle to your bars? especially for those of you saying the front wheel is staying planted?

thanks
yes a great conversation here!
 

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mutaullyassuredsuffering
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musikfan said:
I've got a question or thought....
It was my understanding the Carbon ASR has a stiffer rear end than the previous models and overall was a stiffer frame....
were the same changes made to the alumin. ASR? or is this a carbon benefit?

other question
....I understand you can cut off the entire mast seatpost on the carbon and run a Thompson or other regular seatpost? how does this work? how would the regular seatpost be clamped? pics anyone?

any of you with the ASR's 08/09's what is the drop measurement from your saddle to your bars? especially for those of you saying the front wheel is staying planted?

thanks
yes a great conversation here!
The Carbon is wayyyy stiffer up front. The rear feels a bit stiffer, making me believe part of the flex occurs at the dogbone, as the ASR-C has a burly carbon dogbone.

The new alloy frame is supposed to be 6 percent stiffer up front.

The seatpost adapter for the ASR-C has never materialized. I'm not sure if it will come up in the future.

As far as drop, I run about .5inch of drop.
 
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