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West Chester, PA
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You need something that goes as low as 25 or 30 inch pounds for bikes. That one reads in ft. lbs. and only in 2 1/2 ft lb. increments - thats not nearly accurate enough for the small bolts on bikes. Its also a pain in the ass trying to read the display on a beam wrench when you have it turned sideways torquing a suspension bolt or something.

Get a click one. Much easier to use. Its money well spent, a good one will last your whole life. I have this one - It was on sale in the sears stores for $60 with the case when i got it.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00944593000P?vName=Tools&keyword=torque+wrench

You can get a beam style that measures inch pounds but it will cost more than the click one above.
 

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92gli said:
You need something that goes as low as 25 or 30 inch pounds for bikes. That one reads in ft. lbs. and only in 2 1/2 ft lb. increments - thats not nearly accurate enough for the small bolts on bikes. Its also a pain in the ass trying to read the display on a beam wrench when you have it turned sideways torquing a suspension bolt or something.

Get a click one. Much easier to use. Its money well spent, a good one will last your whole life. I have this one - It was on sale in the sears stores for $60 with the case when i got it.

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_00944593000P?vName=Tools&keyword=torque+wrench

You can get a beam style that measures inch pounds but it will cost more than the click one above.
No way!!! Are you crazy? You don't use a click type on bikes where some fasteners on bikes have yield strengths pretty close to the operating fixing torque. You'll find lots of stories of people with snapped bolts or such things as broken carbon parts because they used a click type.

Incredibly bad advice.
 

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West Chester, PA
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yeah... I'm crazy. And you are without a doubt the biggest blowhard to ever crawl on to the internet. Immediately after this post I'm going to join the list of people that have your posts on ignore. You should change your user ID to "opposite man". Somebody says black, you say white just to hear yourself type.

If click type is so unsuitable why does Park sell them ? Why does the shop owner/mechanic that I used to work for back in college, who has owned his shop for 22 years, use one ?

The solution to your paranoia is to set the wrench at the low end of the torque range recommended for that fastener. And don't be ham-fisted and blow through the click. End of story.
 

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Just because they sell it, doesn't mean it's suitable.

92gli said:
yeah... I'm crazy. And you are without a doubt the biggest blowhard to ever crawl on to the internet. Immediately after this post I'm going to join the list of people that have your posts on ignore. You should change your user ID to "opposite man". Somebody says black, you say white just to hear yourself type.

If click type is so unsuitable why does Park sell them ? Why does the shop owner/mechanic that I used to work for back in college, who has owned his shop for 22 years, use one ?

The solution to your paranoia is to set the wrench at the low end of the torque range recommended for that fastener. And don't be ham-fisted and blow through the click. End of story.
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
You'll find lots of stories of people with snapped bolts or such things as broken carbon parts because they used a click type.
Yup, I'm one of them. I broke an expensive fork part (Extension Control Cartridge on a Marzocchi) by using a clicker style torque wrench. The first click that I heard and felt was that of the part breaking. I've been using beam style wrenches ever since. The beam style wrench has a huge advantage over a clicker in that you can see at all times what the current torque value is.

I've considered getting a dial-style wrench, but they're on the pricey side.
 

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I happen to think the smaller stem, brake, shifter bolts are more important to get precisely right than the bottom bracket and crank bolts that require higher torque so agree the Sears one you linked to has the wrong range for most bicycle fasteners.

I just got this one from PBK - 3-15 Nm range.

http://www.probikekit.com/display.php?code=T0102

So far so good - haven't cracked any carbon bits with it yet - tightened things a little tighter than my previous scared as sh!t hand tighten guesses.

Looks to my uneducated eye like it comes from the same assembly line as the new Park TW-5 with a slightly different handle.

Click type vs Beam type - buggered if I know.
Some info on wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torque_wrench

There's also a thread on Roadbikereview.com where someone links to an informative but techy review of them all - I read it but not sure I understood it - only downside I can see with click type is it may go out of calibration a bit easier, but it sure is easier to use than a beam type also.

Also seem Pedros, Synchro, Park, Guistaforza (pretty reputable names in bike tools) all make click type as do Snap On, SK etc in the automotive world so they can't be too useless.
 
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i got the bbb torquefix, is really good and is tiny for a torque whench, probobly just over the length of my hand, and it can get into really small places, which is usefull, ranges from 2-24 Nm, and comes with a certificate
 

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Also seem Pedros, Synchro, Park, Guistaforza (pretty reputable names in bike tools) all make click type as do Snap On, SK etc in the automotive world so they can't be too useless.
Didn't say they were useless. In this application on bikes, the clickers have limited usage. Telling about brands of automotive and industrial manufacturers that make them also tells nothing because this is the bike sector. First, Pedro's is rebranded crap. It's hardly reputable for tools. While there are applications for clickers, there are limited uses for the clickers on bikes, especially when the beams are pretty accurate, cheap, and hold calibration pretty well. Hell, I used a beam for my exhaust manifold bolts and for my head bolts, as clickers were advised against. The change of snapping a stud or a bolt was too great.
 

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How do I do that?
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I'm on the camp with the beam type wrenches as well. Although I own and use various click type wrenches for my cars, for something as delicate as bicycle parts, common sense tells me to stick with a quality beam type wrench. They are accurate but most of all, that accuracy comes at an affordable price.

Sure you can buy a click type wrench but a good quality one with consistent accuracy, IMO, will cost you a lot more then what an accurate beam type wrench will run you. With a quality beam, there are also no worries about it being accurate or being out of calibration either.

Anyway, for in/lbs torque wrenches that are accurate, hassle free and affordable, go with the beam:thumbsup:

On a similar note, I just picked up a Park tools TW-1 and thought about getting the TW-2 for items on my bike that require more then 60in/lbs. Unfortunately, I'm not too crazy about the range and increments on the TW-2, it's just too broad a scale to be precise IMO. I would like a beam type wrench with a range of say, 0-250in/lbs(?) or something thats a lot more narrow then the TW-2's 0-600in/lbs:confused:

Any ideas? BTW, does Sears even sell a torque wrench with an in/lbs scale? I suppose I can look for a beam type ft/lbs wrench that doesn't go to high....

Thanks.
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
No way!!! Are you crazy? You don't use a click type on bikes where some fasteners on bikes have yield strengths pretty close to the operating fixing torque. You'll find lots of stories of people with snapped bolts or such things as broken carbon parts because they used a click type.

Incredibly bad advice.
thats the biggest bunch of absolute, 100% crap, with absolutely zero factual backing.

a QUALITY clicker is not only fine to use, but better than a beam type wrench, and more accurate.

100 inch pounds is 100 inch pounds is 100 inch pounds. if your arm magically torques stuff within 2% of 100 inch pounds, you're just as good as a 2% clicker, or 2% beams, or 2% dial. its just ridiculous to say 100 inch pounds from a clicker will for some reason magically break stuff.

beam wrenches are cheap. thats the big plus to them. id buy an automotive specific inch pound beam torque wrench. you can get good ones for 40 bucks. a good clicker might run you 150 bucks.
 

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tomsmoto said:
thats the biggest bunch of absolute, 100% crap, with absolutely zero factual backing.

a QUALITY clicker is not only fine to use, but better than a beam type wrench, and more accurate.

100 inch pounds is 100 inch pounds is 100 inch pounds. if your arm magically torques stuff within 2% of 100 inch pounds, you're just as good as a 2% clicker, or 2% beams, or 2% dial. its just ridiculous to say 100 inch pounds from a clicker will for some reason magically break stuff.

beam wrenches are cheap. thats the big plus to them. id buy an automotive specific inch pound beam torque wrench. you can get good ones for 40 bucks. a good clicker might run you 150 bucks.
I hate to agree with him (usually) but, he's not saying a click type provides more torque at the same setting, he's saying that if a click type is out of calibration or not working correctly, your first indication will be a snapped off bolt head. You know if a beam type is working and calibrated as soon as you pick it up.
 
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