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Team Blindspot
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Monkey lite XC riser bars. Does anyone have the torque specs?

TIA
 

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Derailleurless
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S-Works said:
Monkey lite XC riser bars. Does anyone have the torque specs?

TIA
Torque specs are for the stem, not the bar. Single bolt will be different from a two bolt will be different for a four bolt. Carbon fiber bars don't need any second-guessing: torque them the same as you would any aluminum bar.
 

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Team Blindspot
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Speed�b Nate said:
Torque specs are for the stem, not the bar. Single bolt will be different from a two bolt will be different for a four bolt. Carbon fiber bars don't need any second-guessing: torque them the same as you would any aluminum bar.
OK, I spoke with a guy at Easton, he said 30-40 in-lbs. My Thomson guide,( which I found at their website because I threw out the original last year) says 48 in-lbs. I'm going to go to 40 and see how that works.

Thanks
 

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S-Works said:
OK, I spoke with a guy at Easton, he said 30-40 in-lbs. My Thomson guide,( which I found at their website because I threw out the original last year) says 48 in-lbs. I'm going to go to 40 and see how that works.

Thanks
Suit yourself. There is a reason in Eason's handlebar instructions, a disclaimer reads "Installation of handlebar CAUTION! When installing Easton components in conjunction with another manufacturer's components, always follow that manufacturer's
instructions for proper installation procedure.
"

Bolt torque specs serve a real purpose: they ensure an adequate tightness that is neither so loose as to allow bolts to vibrate loose under riding conditions, nor so loose as to allow the handlebar to slip in the clamp, nor overly tight as to cause the bolt or threads to strip or the handlebar to be crushed.

The bolts don't care if you've got aluminum, carbon fiber, or a marshmallow underneath the faceplate -- what's right for one is right for all. This is why no torque range is suggested in the handlebar installation instructions.

It's up to the handlebar manufacturer to build their carbon bar to an adequate strength to withstand normal clamping forces. If you feel your bar is not up to this, or think you need to second guess it because your perception is the carbon fiber is "fragile", I wouldn't take the chance to ride with it.

My Easton CT-2 gave me a bit over two years of service under normal clamping forces, at clyde riding weight. I retired it only after scoring the outer surface near where the shifter pods were mounted. My suggestion is to trust your bar, trust the instructions that came with it, install it to Thomson's torque specs, and worry only about what will happen if your stem bolts turn out because they were installed too loosely.
 

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Team Blindspot
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I hear ya!

Speed�b Nate said:
Suit yourself. There is a reason in Eason's handlebar instructions, a disclaimer reads "Installation of handlebar CAUTION! When installing Easton components in conjunction with another manufacturer's components, always follow that manufacturer's
instructions for proper installation procedure.
"

Bolt torque specs serve a real purpose: they ensure an adequate tightness that is neither so loose as to allow bolts to vibrate loose under riding conditions, nor so loose as to allow the handlebar to slip in the clamp, nor overly tight as to cause the bolt or threads to strip or the handlebar to be crushed.

The bolts don't care if you've got aluminum, carbon fiber, or a marshmallow underneath the faceplate -- what's right for one is right for all. This is why no torque range is suggested in the handlebar installation instructions.

It's up to the handlebar manufacturer to build their carbon bar to an adequate strength to withstand normal clamping forces. If you feel your bar is not up to this, or think you need to second guess it because your perception is the carbon fiber is "fragile", I wouldn't take the chance to ride with it.

My Easton CT-2 gave me a bit over two years of service under normal clamping forces, at clyde riding weight. I retired it only after scoring the outer surface near where the shifter pods were mounted. My suggestion is to trust your bar, trust the instructions that came with it, install it to Thomson's torque specs, and worry only about what will happen if your stem bolts turn out because they were installed too loosely.
I'll go with Thomson's specs. Thanks for setting me straight.
 
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