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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I'm in the process of building my first bike. I have most of the components so far and I just need to put it all together. I was just wondering what the best course of action for tool swould be. I have found a few 'kits' on ebay. I am going to let the LBS do the headset and stearer tube since I don't want to shell out the cash for the headset pusher or whatever it is and don't feel confident enough to do w/o it. Am I going to get everything I need in a basic kit or would I be better off just getting a few specialty tools from my LBS and picking the rest up at a hardware store?

Thanks
 

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First thing, get a QUALITY SET of hex keys. My favorites are Bondhus L keys with the ball end. Not wiha, not Craftsman, not Allen, not Eklind, not Pedros. You can view the Bondhus website and decide for yourself. You can get Bondhus for a steal anywhere, including fleabay. Bike shops should carry the set for about $20, which is less than inferiors, including Pedro's. Wiha is quality, but not as strong and long lasting as Bondhus. Lord knows who makes the Craftsman ones. Trust me, it's not an issue of walking into any sears and replacing a worn tool. It's an issue of the worn tool wasting your time with a messed up bolt.

You need a bottom braket tool, depending on which type of cups you have, a cassette tool, ratchet for the bb tool, wrench for the cassette tool (I use Knipex Cobra and Alligator pliers, best available and many other uses. Cobras are available under the Craftsman name). Cutter for the housing, but I use a Dremel. Pedal wrench, chain tool (I use the fold away Park CT6).

Make sure you buy Loctite blue and use it on everything. Don't do the antisieze thing.

Go to radioshack and get a pack of heatshrink tubing for the cable ends. Get some quality spokewrenches, which don't cost much more than cheap ones, a crankpuller, and you're set. You'll even save going this way.

I prefer going the piecewise way in order to put more money into getting more useful and quality tools. I have a huge toolset for general use around the car anyhow, but I've selected some good ones for my bike toolbox.

And again, go for the Bondhus hex keys. I know from experience about how much longer these things last and how much better they work. They even have a new line that holds the bolt, but is of a better design than the Wiha model. You don't want to round the hex head because of a bad tool.
 

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Jerk_Chicken said:
First thing, get a QUALITY SET of hex keys. My favorites are Bondhus L keys with the ball end. Not wiha, not Craftsman, not Allen, not Eklind, not Pedros. You can view the Bondhus website and decide for yourself. You can get Bondhus for a steal anywhere, including fleabay. Bike shops should carry the set for about $20, which is less than inferiors, including Pedro's. Wiha is quality, but not as strong and long lasting as Bondhus. Lord knows who makes the Craftsman ones. Trust me, it's not an issue of walking into any sears and replacing a worn tool. It's an issue of the worn tool wasting your time with a messed up bolt.

You need a bottom braket tool, depending on which type of cups you have, a cassette tool, ratchet for the bb tool, wrench for the cassette tool (I use Knipex Cobra and Alligator pliers, best available and many other uses. Cobras are available under the Craftsman name). Cutter for the housing, but I use a Dremel. Pedal wrench, chain tool (I use the fold away Park CT6).

Make sure you buy Loctite blue and use it on everything. Don't do the antisieze thing.

Go to radioshack and get a pack of heatshrink tubing for the cable ends. Get some quality spokewrenches, which don't cost much more than cheap ones, a crankpuller, and you're set. You'll even save going this way.

I prefer going the piecewise way in order to put more money into getting more useful and quality tools. I have a huge toolset for general use around the car anyhow, but I've selected some good ones for my bike toolbox.

And again, go for the Bondhus hex keys. I know from experience about how much longer these things last and how much better they work. They even have a new line that holds the bolt, but is of a better design than the Wiha model. You don't want to round the hex head because of a bad tool.
WOW!!!!! How much torque are you putting on your hex bolts??;) I now have quality tools, but have never had a problem with rounding out bolt heads or wearing tools to the point of no return when using crap tools. I am going to look at those Bondhus keys as they sound like a nice set. I just have to wear out the current set that I have had for many years.

I'm just busting Chickens..... do chickens have balls???:p Anyhow, I agree with him wholeheartedly. BUY GOOD TOOLS!! It will save you money and time since you will be able to do the job correctly the first time.

One other thing that is priceless to have is a GOOD torque wrench. Using the proper torque on ALL of your bolts and fasteners is the only way to ensure that your bike will behave they way that you want it to. One example that stands out in my mind is when people overtorque clamps onto carbon bars. This is a good way to ruin an expensive component due to the lack of proper tools and technique.
 

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No problem. I researched and I'm at the point where I don't want disposable anything, especially tools.

I've always used Bondhus. When I was a kid, someone royally messed up the hex bolts on my BMX's stem, so I always have taken extra care of these bolts. The way to do it is to use quality tools. As far as Bondhus, I just decided on them at the local bike shop by chance, but I do use them a lot, from working on two bikes regularly, as well as those of friends, to working on the car. I noted the edges haven't worn like the other bands I've used. I did more research while overhauling my tools and lusted after the Wiha MagicRing line. I almost bought a set, then saw Bondhus made another version which didn't compromise the strength of the ball end (lots of tech files on their site). I wouldn't use it to break bolts free, but they use a grade of steel that's supposed to be very good. Couple this with my personal experience and why would I bother with another brand? Wiha makes great tools, but if the grade of steel available to their market isn't as good, why would I experiment? Bondhus also has a no questions asked replacement policy.

Now the Knipex pliers are from Germany. The best and most useful tools I've found recently. So much common sense went into the design, from the pinch-free handles, great feel and ergonomics, hard alloy, and jaws designed to hold bolts.





Knipex Cobra and Alligator link
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey,

Thanks for the quick replies. I haven't really cheaped out on the bike yet so I may as well go all the way with the tools too. I'll be heading to my LBS to get some basics tomorrow and to get an estimate on the headset/fork install.

Thanks again
 
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