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Faller - Expert Class
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647 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,

After picking up a set of Dave's SpeedDream wheels at the beginning of the season and being amazed at what a difference they made, I've since become interested in attempting to build up a wheelset of my own, and was wondering what all tools I would need.

I know that I would need a truing stand and a set of spoke wrenches, but beyond that I'm not too clear on. I'm assuming that I may need some hub servicing tools too, but again I'm not too sure.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks again for the help!!! :)
 

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Faller - Expert Class
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647 Posts
Discussion Starter #3

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Super Moderator
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48,237 Posts
dogonfr said:
Dont forget the tool to remove & install the cassette & if you use disc the proper wrench for the bolts.
Not required to build the wheels. They are needed to setup the wheels after they are built.
 

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Meh.
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17,508 Posts
The tensiometers (sp?) to measure spoke tension aren't NEEDED but they sure help.

The spokes also need to be bent in order for them to seat properly. So... pliers would also help.
 

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A wheelist
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XSL_WiLL said:
The spokes also need to be bent in order for them to seat properly. So... pliers would also help.
Pliers? Ugghh! Shig uses his thumb; I tap gently with a plastic-faced hammer.
 

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customized
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It is true all you "need" is a spoke wrench, but I wouldn't even bother if your used to such a precise wheel as one from Dave.

To be technical, you need something to hold the wheel in and some sort of device to let you know if it is straight... I would love to see Shiggy riding a wheel he built in his lap with just that one spoke wrench.

If you want to learn to do it you should do it on a quality truing stand and really take your time... do not skimp on any step. I would read all you can on the subject before you do your first wheel. I think the most important steps will be destressing the spokes often. Once you build a few then you can do it less often. You will get a feel for it.

Your fingers will hurt before you are done.
 

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Registered
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Park spoke wrenches, the adjustable comes in handy for working with stripped spoke nipples.

And a good truing stand.

If it's the first wheel let the local shop check the tension.

And read everything you can.
 

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Severum said:
...To be technical, you need something to hold the wheel in and some sort of device to let you know if it is straight... I would love to see Shiggy riding a wheel he built in his lap with just that one spoke wrench...
I never said you build the wheel with it laying in your lap. Read Mike T.'s wheelbuilding info I referred to. You can build good wheels by using the fork/frame to hold the wheel as you work on it. A truing stand makes it easier but is not necessary.

I built dozens of wheels with only a Park spoke wrench and a $20 truing stand that was not much (if any) better than an old fork.
 

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customized
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shiggy said:
I never said you build the wheel with it laying in your lap. Read Mike T.'s wheelbuilding info I referred to. You can build good wheels by using the fork/frame to hold the wheel as you work on it. A truing stand makes it easier but is not necessary.

I built dozens of wheels with only a Park spoke wrench and a $20 truing stand that was not much (if any) better than an old fork.
I didn't mean to be rude. I was actually trying to humor you, which is a rare occurance as far as I have ever seen on these boards. Maybe I missed it though in your abundance of posts.

Btw, a truing stand or a fork when used to build a wheel... is a tool. If you only "need" a spoke wrench as a tool, then I suppose you would have to set it on your lap and eye ball it. I get what you were saying though... no need to buy any new tools since you already would have a bike to use.
 
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