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What a beauty :thumbsup: Hummmmm, I think I've got room for one more Ritchey ;)
 

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Damn, my size too..........

........I have a couple of delicious and superfluous bikes to tempt you with if you ever....
 

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Holy Chromoly!!
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Im filling up with envy here....
 

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Fat City Michael
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Whoa, that's NicE!

Are those actual lugs, or did TR sculpt them as he Brazed the frame?

What a true Classic!

Michael-NYC
 

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IVMTB & VMBEFG Illuminati
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Fatmikeynyc said:
Whoa, that's NicE!

Are those actual lugs, or did TR sculpt them as he Brazed the frame?

What a true Classic!

Michael-NYC
they're not lugs. they are steel sleeves that he puts over the tube to give it the lug look and then fillet brazed the tubes together. really cool effect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Veloculture said:
any word on about how mant were made?
Thanks guys. It rides pretty nice. Made to be sort of a "luxury cruiser" type of mountain bike and that it does well. Took it for a nice 2 and a half hour cruise on some mellow trails while the youngun's were snoozing. Very nice riding machine. Very effortless and comfy.

Sky, not sure how many were made, but probably not a whole lot of them. Mine is serial number 1A4. The 4th Annapurna or probably the 4th 21" Annapurna. There are a few early models (before they made it to the catalog) like Laffeaux's and Sidewinder's. I dont think those have the "A" serial number though and probably werent yet called Annapurnas, but they are built the same.

Don Juan, it weighs 28.8 pounds (I was curious). Rides nice and light though. Thats about normal for that vintage anyway.

Mike, thanks, I agree. Yeah, like Sky said, those are shaped sections of tubes brazed onto the normal tubing and then fillet brazed in place. I'd imagine beyond the craftsmanship part, its also a pretty strong joint with that external butting...
 

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Oh my.
What a beauty!
That's a nice score :thumbsup:

Love the color too, I'm so jealous :)



I hope you'll post some more pics......

--
CR
 

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Retro on Steroids
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Here's mine

My '83 Annapurna hung on the wall until this year, when the boys at the Paradigm shop went the extra mile, hunting for parts on EBay to restore it to original condition.

Here's a photo of my bike with the guy who made it 23 years ago.
 

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Fat City Michael
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Veloculture said:
they're not lugs. they are steel sleeves that he puts over the tube to give it the lug look and then fillet brazed the tubes together. really cool effect.
Thanks for the info-It's amazing how the headtube and the sleeves that are all fillet brazed together to the top tube and down tube make it all appear to be one smooth flowing piece of slick hand made craftsmanship! :thumbsup:

Michael-NYC
 

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Fat City Michael
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Fillet-brazed said:
Thanks guys. It rides pretty nice. Made to be sort of a "luxury cruiser" type of mountain bike and that it does well. Took it for a nice 2 and a half hour cruise on some mellow trails while the youngun's were snoozing. Very nice riding machine. Very effortless and comfy.

Sky, not sure how many were made, but probably not a whole lot of them. Mine is serial number 1A4. The 4th Annapurna or probably the 4th 21" Annapurna. There are a few early models (before they made it to the catalog) like Laffeaux's and Sidewinder's. I dont think those have the "A" serial number though and probably werent yet called Annapurnas, but they are built the same.

Don Juan, it weighs 28.8 pounds (I was curious). Rides nice and light though. Thats about normal for that vintage anyway.

Mike, thanks, I agree. Yeah, like Sky said, those are shaped sections of tubes brazed onto the normal tubing and then fillet brazed in place. I'd imagine beyond the craftsmanship part, its also a pretty strong joint with that external butting...
The first, last and only actual Ritchey Annapurna that I ever saw with my own eyes was in the bike shop that I worked in back in the summer of 1986, it was a metallic brown color and the owner said that the bike was "kind of old" back then, so I guess it was like an 82-83?

Michael-NYC
 

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VRC Illuminati
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:smilewinkgrin:
Fillet-brazed said:
Been looking for one of these for a long time. :)

Just thought I'd post a couple pics from the ride and a couple shots of some frame details.
You suck.

:smilewinkgrin:
 

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Fatmikeynyc said:
The first, last and only actual Ritchey Annapurna that I ever saw with my own eyes was in the bike shop that I worked in back in the summer of 1986, it was a metallic brown color and the owner said that the bike was "kind of old" back then, so I guess it was like an 82-83?

Michael-NYC
Fillet-brazed: beautiful bike! It's a great color too. From riding my Annapurna, I know how effortless (and addicting) they are to ride.:D Congrats on a great score!:thumbsup:

A metallic brown Annapurna? I wonder if it could have been mine? I didn't own this bike until 1999, and I bought it from a someone in Vermont. (As Fillet-brazed mentioned, mine is most likely not an Annapurna, but rather an Everest, even though it shares the same frame construction.) Mine has the older double crown fork, TA cranks, and Huret Duopar derailleur. It also has a NORBA decal on the seattube.

Craig in NJ
 

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FB, jk. Cruel sarcasm. A masterpiece, of course. Did you acquire that built properly? Or did you have to hunt and peck?

Repack Rider said:
Here's a photo of my bike with the guy who made it 23 years ago.
I like that shot of Tom with your Anna. The look on the guys face in the background is exactly how I think of todays crop of riders. Mostly because everyone I know that rides looks like that guy, knows that "real" mountain bikes have at least 5 inches of travel, are all made of aluminum, all come from china, but that it doesn't matter... And they all wind up with a blank/perplexed look like that guys when in the presence of something truly exceptional, lost trying to identify what would possibly be worth looking at about what looks any other old mountain bike. This begs the question: When we die off, will anyone care about these? Quite possibly the answer is no. All the reason I need to ride my antiques. :)
 

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Don Juan said:
FB, jk. Cruel sarcasm. A masterpiece, of course. Did you acquire that built properly? Or did you have to hunt and peck?

I like that shot of Tom with your Anna. The look on the guys face in the background is exactly how I think of todays crop of riders. Mostly because everyone I know that rides looks like that guy, knows that "real" mountain bikes have at least 5 inches of travel, are all made of aluminum, all come from china, but that it doesn't matter... And they all wind up with a blank/perplexed look like that guys when in the presence of something truly exceptional, lost trying to identify what would possibly be worth looking at about what looks any other old mountain bike. This begs the question: When we die off, will anyone care about these? Quite possibly the answer is no. All the reason I need to ride my antiques. :)
You never know. He could have been thinking "Man, those clips and straps are totally the wrong vintage!"
 

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robinmiller said:
You never know. He could have been thinking "Man, those clips and straps are totally the wrong vintage!"
Na, I actually talked to that guy earlier at the Ritchey booth, he was clueless. :rolleyes: Although the pedals and clips may be a few years too new its about function sometimes. I personally use clipless pedals on all my vintage riders unless its just to cruze the pits. Tires are another major concern on a vintage bike like that. Not too may snakebellies or original stumpjumper tires out there.
 
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