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Ride when trails are wet/muddy?

  • Yes.

    Votes: 13 34.2%
  • No.

    Votes: 19 50.0%
  • Who cares.

    Votes: 4 10.5%
  • Would I have to wash my bike?

    Votes: 2 5.3%
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

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You serious Clark?
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
As far as etiquette goes, should you wait till trails are dry or ride whenever?:nono:
As anybody in Wv knows, if we waited for dry conditions here it would leave us all of,... 20 days of riding.
So chime in. :thumbsup:
 

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I would say if an entire trail was muddy and would be damaged by riding it then no. But if it was just random mud holes along the trail then yes.
 

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the unvarnished nonsense
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What is this "dry" thing you speak of?

Having lived in the Monongahela National Forest for 8 cycling seasons, my opinion is that the Mon trails can not be damaged by bikes under ANY circumstances.
 

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davis said:
What is this "dry" thing you speak of?
As I told ODN and Snotty yesterday as we were getting ready to ride Dolly Sods and it was downpouring and 53 degrees; "Gentlemen, we ain't getting any dryer! Lets go!":thumbsup:

As Davis says, you're not hurting there trails here. In fact, I'd argue that these trails hurt your bike more than you hurt them!:eek:
 

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I think the decision is location dependent.

I also ride in WV often, and no doubt the dryest days on Plantation Trail would be deemed unrideable by DC standards. It all comes down to traffic. In DC a popular trail like Shaeffer Farms or Wakefield sees one hundred or more times the number of riders in a week than any trail does in the Davis/Canaan area. When ridden while wet and muddy they quickly widen out and degenerate into boggy messes. The trails are all multi-use as well, so mud riding brings grief to the MTB community through the complaints and criticism of other trail users.

In WV we have so many trails, I thiink more trails are lost because they are not ridden enough and Mother Nature takes them back so quickly. The trails are rocky as hell so they are naturally more resistant to wet conditions. Still, what dirt we have tends to range from wet black tar to soft and runny peanut butter. In WV, if you don't ride in the wet you won't ride at all.

Repo
 

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You serious Clark?
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everyone for the input so far.
Clint
 

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Masher
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Yeah, I voted in the context of my local trails that get damaged enough even when it is dry.

My favorite local trails are in terrible shape from all the impatience over the past couple months.
 

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MisterC said:
Yeah, I voted in the context of my local trails that get damaged enough even when it is dry.
Maybe we should all just stand around and look at them then. No more riding.
 

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song of the saw-whet owl
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crashedandburned said:
As Davis says, you're not hurting there trails here. In fact, I'd argue that these trails hurt your bike more than you hurt them!:eek:
there is no doubt on that! (horses on the other hand, just absolutely destroy the multi-use trails when wet.. and youll NEVER see those mofos out doing trail work either)
 

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Bicycle rider
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Definitely depends on were you live/type of soil (or lack of) and how many people ride the trails.
 

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Bicycle rider
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tbaier said:
Maybe we should all just stand around and look at them then. No more riding.
Good idea… as long as there is beer involved!
 

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Because I am !
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Have to agree with the location dependant thing. Repoman stated it well and davis put the exclamation point on it ! Thing is, if you care about a trail system, you'll make an effort to work with the managers and fix the places that don't heal well. Before you know it you'll have trails you can ride when wet with very minimal damage.

ODN
 

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You serious Clark?
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
davis said:
What is this "dry" thing you speak of?
Yes, I believe it was 1930, I think it was called the dust plate,.. or cup, some kind of dish. :idea:
I would say it would have not eroded the trail then, but the slightest spark from disk brakes would have burned the whole mountain to embers!

On a different note, there are 2 to 1 in favor of not riding muddy. I would think the nays would try to convince the yays otherwise with their opines?:rant:
 

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outdoornut said:
.... Thing is, if you care about a trail system, you'll make an effort to work with the managers and fix the places that don't heal well. Before you know it you'll have trails you can ride when wet with very minimal damage.

ODN
More people need to think your way. I do a lot of trail work on the trails I ride the most. We know what sections need the most work since we ride on them in all conditions. So I don't see anything wrong with riding muddy trails as long as you put your time in if needed. Don't leave it all up to the 'other' people to do the dirty work.
 

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featherweight clydesdale
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1,383 Posts
+1 on the decision being location specific and dependent on the volume of trail users.

If you're one of a small number to see a particular rocky soil based trail on any given week, go for it. If you live somewhere large enough to be classified as a city, your "public" trail is clay or loam based, and it gets dozens to hundreds of riders per week, then you should wait.

I hope those out there riding in slop are the first ones out there with a Mcleod fixing the damage.

If we're talking about a trail that you personally own, then nobody should be dictating your use.
 
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