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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I gave up buying road conti. I liked the blue road conti's but last time i got blue vredestein.

on the mtb, i have a conti mtn king 2.4" in the front. i heard they get a lot of puncture flats, and I have been getting my share.

so i hope to get new tires for the mudd season. what should i be getting? where can i get them on the cheap?

currently have clnchers
  • 2.4" mtn king front
  • 2.1" kenda nevagal rear

thannx
 

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jkmacman said:
I gave up buying road conti. I liked the blue road conti's but last time i got blue vredestein.

on the mtb, i have a conti mtn king 2.4" in the front. i heard they get a lot of puncture flats, and I have been getting my share.

so i hope to get new tires for the mudd season. what should i be getting? where can i get them on the cheap?

currently have clnchers
  • 2.4" mtn king front
  • 2.1" kenda nevagal rear

thannx
Which model of MK's? Protection? Supersonic? Standard? 26" or 29"?

Mountain King 2.4 Protection IS my rear tire for the winter season on the 26" bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Everyone said put the wider tire in the front. I bought 2 mtn king, but put nevegal that came stock w/my yukon fx back on the rear

this pic is from last winter. i never got the spikes this year, but i'm shopping for some x-c tires for this year:thumbsup:
 

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jkmacman said:
Everyone said put the wider tire in the front. I bought 2 mtn king, but put nevegal that came stock w/my yukon fx back on the rear

this pic is from last winter. i never got the spikes this year, but i'm shopping for some x-c tires for this year:thumbsup:
Does your tire say "protection" or "supersonic" anywhere on it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
the tire's in my car, i'll check on my break. my 2nd set of tires is on my 2nd wheel set, all terrainasurus wtb good fot the tarmac:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I bought the conti 2.4" mtn king last year. i checked the tire it doesn't differentiate the model. be that as it may, i've seen a lot of posts about the infereior side wall resulting in frequent flats. i remember last year i was cursing the kenda nevagal,s but I've since worn one out and tossed it and have the origianl stock one on the rear. i may end up using the wtb more any ways as good for tarmac & off-road, I plan to do a lot this spring:thumbsup:
 

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jkmacman said:
I bought the conti 2.4" mtn king last year. i checked the tire it doesn't differentiate the model. be that as it may, i've seen a lot of posts about the infereior side wall resulting in frequent flats.
It is rather futile to discuss the sidewalls (or any aspect) of the MK without saying which model. The Supersonics are tissue paper thin, and it is not surprising to hear complains related to this. The Protection models are actually quite sturdy and are not flat-prone compared to other tires of similar volume and weight. The standard model (which you have) are somewhere in between, and not as flat resistant as the Protection version, and also they are not made with the black chili compound which makes a noticeable difference in wet performance as well as tread wear.

The different MK models are really quite different tires. I have a 2.4 protection on the rear of my 26" bike for the winter, and it is one of the two best tires I have run back there. I have a 2.2 standard model on the rear of my 29er, and it is not very good at all. Pretty lousy, actually, and it is wearing out fast.

Anyway, to your original question, there are a number of mud-tire-related threads on this board that you may find helpful. The thing about mud is that tires that excel in the mud are generally very slow rollers and not too great on harder, cleaner surfaces. You will need to decide how much you are willing to sacrifice on non-muddy conditions to have better traction in the mud. To be honest, I think something like a 2.1 Nev in the rear is actually a decent choice for an all around winter tire. As far as the front, I liked the MK 2.4 protection OK for the front in muddy conditions when I tried it, but I would not want the standard model you have on there on the front when it gets wet. Something with a soft or sticky compound would be nice for the wet roots and rocks. Maybe something like a Stick-E (not DTC) Nevegal in either 2.1 or 2.35?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was aware of the chili compound on the road conti, but not on the mtb. I know the mtb all terrains underperform when wet. I'll try and pick up the 2.4 mtn king chili compound protection for the front and another 2.1 kenda nevegal for the rear:thumbsup:
 

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For mud, most seem to prefer relatively skinny tires with large widely spaced knobs. Mountain King might not be it.

I have been very happy with my MK 2.4 SuperSonics, as allrounders: OK everywhere but not really excellent at anything. They may be thin if you have a lot of rocks. Mine are doing fine, and I have shredded some other light tires on the same trails.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
They may be thin if you have a lot of rocks.
Here in jersey we have tons of rocks from baby heads to boulders.All around is good but the supersonic sidewalls leave much to be desired :(
 

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So you need some heavier tires with tougher sidewalls.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
jersey terrain

Most of my riding is in new jersey, usa. we have lots of rocks and bushes w/thornes were I ride


this pic is from hi mtn preserve on one of the summits. most of the trails are covered w/baby head rocks that can cause pinches in the sidewall

however my spring training ride on the mtb will be tarmac and off-road. my all terrains are good for the tarmac, but too slippery for the rocky terrain

https://connect.garmin.com/activity/22795806


there rocks are near where I enter hi mtn 1st time, i then go back to the tarmac and re-enter past another range

wiki said:
The preserve contains geological points of interest, including a rare traprock basalt glade and rock shelters which have been determined to be sites of prehistoric human habitation. During the American Revolution, high points along the ridge were used as signaling posts. Hiking trails are maintained by the New York - New Jersey Trail Conference. The summit of High Mountain provides a spectacular view of New York City.
 

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If you are getting pinch flats, you need more pressure or tubeless. If you have thorns, you need tubeless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
perttime said:
If you are getting pinch flats, you need more pressure or tubeless. If you have thorns, you need tubeless.
I tend to over inflate as a couple of years ago I was getting flats on the nevegals, and some one recommended to over inflate espcially on race day:thumbsup:
 

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jkmacman said:
Most of my riding is in new jersey, usa. we have lots of rocks and bushes w/thornes were I ride


this pic is from hi mtn preserve on one of the summits. most of the trails are covered w/baby head rocks that can cause pinches in the sidewall

however my spring training ride on the mtb will be tarmac and off-road. my all terrains are good for the tarmac, but too slippery for the rocky terrain

https://connect.garmin.com/activity/22795806


there rocks are near where I enter hi mtn 1st time, i then go back to the tarmac and re-enter past another range
I grew up in northern NJ, and spent a year riding MTB when I moved back for a year in 2001-2002. Yes, very rocky. If pinch flats are a problem, and you are sticking with tubes, there are several ways to deal with this. One is simply running higher pressure. Another is going with a larger volume tire, which allows lower pressure without pinch-flatting. Finally, some tire have sidewalls more resistant to pinch flats. As far as punctures, thicker casing and thicker tubes help, but Tubless really sounds like the best answer there. I never had a problem with puncture flats when I was in NJ, but the vegetation can vary a lot.

I think you will really appreciate having a soft/sticky compound on the front tire in that region, as I find those rocks are often wet. Same with the rear, though many softer compound wear very quickly in the rear. This is where something like a dual compound (hard in the middle, soft on the edges) is nice, or one of Conti's Black Chili Tires.

My personal favorite combo to date for that sort of terrain is a Big Betty up front (Gooey Gluey Compound, NOT the triple compound), and a MK 2.4 Protection in the rear. The Big Betty with the GGC sticks to wet rocks very well, and I find it is very good at keeping a line in rock gardens and resisting being deflected sideways off of rocks that are caught on the edge. The downside to the BB is that it is not cheap, and the soft compound does wear out fast, even in the front (I got about a year of full time use up front). It is not to hot as a mud tire, but personally I have found that less important in the front than in the rear, and it is good enough for what I encountered in northern NJ. Also, in a year of running ~23 psi in the front with superlight tubes, and weighing ~190 with gear, I only pinch-flatted once, and it was only noticed after the bike sat overnight. It may be heavier than what you are after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Big Betty up front (Gooey Gluey Compound, NOT the triple compound), and a MK 2.4 Protection in the rear.
most people said go wider in front. yesterday the 2.1" nevegals had no traction at all going uphill in moderately muddy conditions.

I'm a little tight for cash, so I may put the mtn king i have 2.4" on the rear of one of my wheelsets and get a big betty for the front of one of the wheel sets
 

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jkmacman said:
most people said go wider in front. yesterday the 2.1" nevegals had no traction at all going uphill in moderately muddy conditions.

I'm a little tight for cash, so I may put the mtn king i have 2.4" on the rear of one of my wheelsets and get a big betty for the front of one of the wheel sets
Was the Nev just sliding in the mud, or was it an issue of traction over muddy rock/roots?

It can't hurt to try the MK you have in the rear, but my guess it that it will be a toss-up between them in terms of mud traction. Let us know what you think after the switch. Of course, the extra volume will be nice and will let you get away with lower pressure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
climbing up the hill, in minimal mudd, it felt like the kenda was flat. i have a ride sunday and it supposed to snow and rain. it's probably a good time to try out the 2.4" conti on the rear, I may just take the all terrains off the rear of wheel set #2
so then i'll have

  • mavic front: mtn king 2.4
  • mavic rear: kenda nevagal 2.1
  • stock front: all terrain 1.9
  • stock rear: mtn king 2.4

so sunday's inclimate weather I'll have conti mtn king on front & rear. maybe this can hold me over to the trails dry out. I like x-c, and as a part time roadie, I like to get the heart rate & cadence up in the woods, so I might eventually go a little skinnier then the 2.4":thumbsup:
 

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When I got my first set of contis I got 3 pinch flats on the first ride. After a bit of head sc ratching I worked out that its due to the case flexing more than other tyres.

Im still running contis but they require more pressure in them than other brands of tyres in the same size. If you read the conti website they recommend 45 psi.

Im 100kgs and 45 psi in the rear and 38 in the front is good for me.
 

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Paul1977 said:
When I got my first set of contis I got 3 pinch flats on the first ride.
...
Im 100kgs and 45 psi in the rear and 38 in the front is good for me.
Which Contis is that?

The pressures you need depend on tyre volume, and a bunch of other things.

I don't really trust my pump's pressure gauge but I don't think I've ever gone above 40 psi on my MK 2.4 SS rear. And I am about your weight.
 
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