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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Until today, I was dead set on buying a Titus Racer X. I was looking for a fast XC bike and the Titus seems tot perfectly fit into that picture. Reading this forum, I only got more enthusiastic (thanks everybody).

Today, I test drove a 2009 Scalpel 3 and must say: great bike. I compared the geometry of both bikes and they seem very much alike. I still lean towards the Titus slightly, but would love to hear (=read) some views on them. What bike would be best fitted for XC riding (and some technical trailing)? Any big pro's and con's that I am missing?

Again, to me it seems the bikes are very much comparable, but I am a newcomer.

Ideally, I would testride them both one 1 day, but I live about 2000 miles and two flights from the nearest Titus dealer ;-)
 

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Standard vs Proprietary

I cannot stand proprietary parts like leftys and cannondale cranksets. I have spent a few hours riding Leftys are great forks, but most bike shops do not stock the parts to service and repair them. All forks need service from time to time. I don't know that leftys are any less reliable then other forks, but it will have to be mailed off for service probably annually. I have 3 1 1/8 inch steerer forks that can be swapped on if the fork on my RX needs service. If I had a lefty or a New fangled tapered steerer none of the parts that I have are any good. Same thing with front wheels. Its easy to borrow a front wheel from a friend as long as they are the standred quick release type. Good luck finding a buddy that has a spare lefty wheel kicking about, or a tapered steerer fork from a few years ago.

So my point is that I would choose the Racer-X with its standard easily replaced and serviced parts, and I would stick with standard stuff until there is something new that is actually superior by a signifigant margin. The Propritary Cannondale and Specialized stuff works great, but I don't think there is a signifigant performance gain to justify the more difficult and more expensive service. My advice is to get the new X or buy my 2008. There are other great XC race bikes out there but I have not ridden anything better then a Racer-x.
 

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Pedalfaraway said:
Personally I cannot stand proprietary parts like leftys and cannondale cranksets. Leftys are great forks, but most bike shops do not stock the parts to service and repair them. All forks need service and I don't know that leftys are any less reliable then a fox, but I have 3 1 1/8 inch steerer forks that can be swapped on if the fork on my RX needs service. If I had a lefty or a New fangled tapered steerer none of the parts that I have are any good. Same thing with front wheels. Its easy to borrow a front wheel from a friend as long as they are the standred quick release type. Good luck finding a buddy that has a spare lefty wheel kicking about, or a tapered steerer fork from a few years ago.

So my point is that I would choose the Racer-X with its standard easily replaced and serviced parts. The Propritary Cannondale and Specialized stuff works great, but I don't think there is a signifigant performance gain to justify the more difficult and more expensive service. My advice is to get the new X or buy my 2008. There are other great XC race bikes out there but I have not ridden anything better then a Racer-x.
Wow...great advice.:thumbsup:
 

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i think if you spend any amount of time on the c'dale you will find it has significantly more (undesirable) flex than does the x. sure the c'dale rear end is designed to flex as part of the suspension movement, but it also flexes in directions you don't want. also look how thin the stays are, too fragile to be on a mountain bike imo.
 

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I demo'd a Rush

My LBS (Revolution Mtn Sports in SLC Utah) Was nice enough to let me borrow a Cannondale rush for like a week one time. I know we are talking about Scalpels which I don't have a ton of experience with but I noticed Zero unwanted Flex from the Rush. I was really impressed with the bike. I did not buy one because of the Aforementioned dislike of propriatry stuff but for a bike thats both raceable and trailable its as good as I have been on.
 

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I have not ridden a scalpel, so I cannot speak to its ride qualities, but one of the reasons I would not buy one is because based on some reviews, it is pretty much a race only bike. Unlike the Rush, it is not as versatile.

My Racer-X is crazy versatile. Not only is it an amazing climber, it is also good at descending and it turns and handles better than any XC bike I have ever ridden. Through the flats, this thing hauls too.There is no sluggishness at all with this bike. If I was a skinny racer boy who intended to do no real trail riding with it, I might go with the scalpel, but the racer x is still going to easily be competitive with it and it is a good trailbike too.
 

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RX Vs 'dale Scapel

I am lucky enough to have a racer-x carbon and a scapel team. Admittedly the scapel is a first generation bike and is 6 years old now.

I have a training loop which I ride regularly about twice a week in the summer. Just after I got the RX I rode my scapel and my racer X around the loop a few times across a week. The Racer X takes nearly 3 min less than the scapel which is pretty good for a loop that hitherto was taking 37min 30 secs.

I use a Garmin edge and when I analysed my rides, I found that my speed across the really rough sections of the loop were much faster. Simply put the Racer X made it easier to keep pedaling in the rough so I went faster around the loop as a whole. However my average heart rate for the loop was about 5BPM higher as I was not using the rough sections as a chance to stop pedaling and rest.

The Scapel does feel more stable on long smooth downhills due to its long wheelbase and perhaps overly long chainstays. And this is supported by my analysis of the loop using the Garmin data.

Both bikes are pretty good on corners. The scapel is noticeably lighter when you pick it up, but this weight difference is really only noticeable on smooth trails. I'd also say the RX is more agile on singletrack.

Scapel wins on smooth uphills, the Racer-X wins on rough uphills.

Probably because of the longer travel, bob is more noticeable on the RX.

I have had no maintenance issues with the Scapel and the Lefty (with ELO) is a very smooth fork. The rear stays have remained intact although I did wear out the bearings on my frog link which ultimately led to the frog link failing but it was a cheap fix. The lefty probably has a little less lateral flex than the Fox F32 on the Racer-x.

Both bikes are bonkers expensive. The Racer-X is significantly cooler in the UK where I ride. Which is a big thing if you are a show off like me.

Finally, in the last 3 years I have ridden the cannondale 5 times. But I ride the RX every week. I think that is all the recommendation you need.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
robinfisk said:
Finally, in the last 3 years I have ridden the cannondale 5 times. But I ride the RX every week. I think that is all the recommendation you need.
Thanks a lot for sharing your experience! Reinforces my choice for the racer x. A bit to my suprise, it seems a much better trailbike then I thought.
 

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robinfisk said:
I am lucky enough to have a racer-x carbon and a scapel team. Admittedly the scapel is a first generation bike and is 6 years old now.

I have a training loop which I ride regularly about twice a week in the summer. Just after I got the RX I rode my scapel and my racer X around the loop a few times across a week. The Racer X takes nearly 3 min less than the scapel which is pretty good for a loop that hitherto was taking 37min 30 secs.

I use a Garmin edge and when I analysed my rides, I found that my speed across the really rough sections of the loop were much faster. Simply put the Racer X made it easier to keep pedaling in the rough so I went faster around the loop as a whole. However my average heart rate for the loop was about 5BPM higher as I was not using the rough sections as a chance to stop pedaling and rest.

The Scapel does feel more stable on long smooth downhills due to its long wheelbase and perhaps overly long chainstays. And this is supported by my analysis of the loop using the Garmin data.

Both bikes are pretty good on corners. The scapel is noticeably lighter when you pick it up, but this weight difference is really only noticeable on smooth trails. I'd also say the RX is more agile on singletrack.

Scapel wins on smooth uphills, the Racer-X wins on rough uphills.

Probably because of the longer travel, bob is more noticeable on the RX.

I have had no maintenance issues with the Scapel and the Lefty (with ELO) is a very smooth fork. The rear stays have remained intact although I did wear out the bearings on my frog link which ultimately led to the frog link failing but it was a cheap fix. The lefty probably has a little less lateral flex than the Fox F32 on the Racer-x.

Both bikes are bonkers expensive. The Racer-X is significantly cooler in the UK where I ride. Which is a big thing if you are a show off like me.

Finally, in the last 3 years I have ridden the cannondale 5 times. But I ride the RX every week. I think that is all the recommendation you need.
Solid review! thanks
 

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robinfisk said:
I am lucky enough to have a racer-x carbon and a scapel team. Admittedly the scapel is a first generation bike and is 6 years old now.

I have a training loop which I ride regularly about twice a week in the summer. Just after I got the RX I rode my scapel and my racer X around the loop a few times across a week. The Racer X takes nearly 3 min less than the scapel which is pretty good for a loop that hitherto was taking 37min 30 secs.

I use a Garmin edge and when I analysed my rides, I found that my speed across the really rough sections of the loop were much faster. Simply put the Racer X made it easier to keep pedaling in the rough so I went faster around the loop as a whole. However my average heart rate for the loop was about 5BPM higher as I was not using the rough sections as a chance to stop pedaling and rest.

The Scapel does feel more stable on long smooth downhills due to its long wheelbase and perhaps overly long chainstays. And this is supported by my analysis of the loop using the Garmin data.

Both bikes are pretty good on corners. The scapel is noticeably lighter when you pick it up, but this weight difference is really only noticeable on smooth trails. I'd also say the RX is more agile on singletrack.

Scapel wins on smooth uphills, the Racer-X wins on rough uphills.

Probably because of the longer travel, bob is more noticeable on the RX.

I have had no maintenance issues with the Scapel and the Lefty (with ELO) is a very smooth fork. The rear stays have remained intact although I did wear out the bearings on my frog link which ultimately led to the frog link failing but it was a cheap fix. The lefty probably has a little less lateral flex than the Fox F32 on the Racer-x.

Both bikes are bonkers expensive. The Racer-X is significantly cooler in the UK where I ride. Which is a big thing if you are a show off like me.

Finally, in the last 3 years I have ridden the cannondale 5 times. But I ride the RX every week. I think that is all the recommendation you need.
Wow, really good post. It is nice to see data like that regarding the two bikes. What is also telling is that you ride the Racer X more than the Scapel.
 
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