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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey i was jut wondering how titanium would hold up in a montain bike frame
 

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local trails rider
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It holds up very well.
Do a search.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
can they take as much abuse as say steel or chromoly
 

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local trails rider
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Titanium is a good material. It can handle whatever the designer and manufacturing process make out of it. A titanium XC frame will last "forever" if you use it as intended. A DJ frame has different requirements.

Here's one that I know of: http://www.chargebikes.com/products/

It is not particularly cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
so if i said i had the chance for about 600 bucks to design and make my own titanium bike would it be worth it
 

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Yes it is, so long as you don't screw up the design. You going to weld it yourself? That could be tricky. Or will someone else make it for you?
 

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Formerbmx37 said:
so if i said i had the chance for about 600 bucks to design and make my own titanium bike would it be worth it
You talking about a UBI class or something similar? For $600 I'd hit it (normally it's closer to $3k).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well i got this guy that married into my family with a metal shop, im talking metal lathes, cnc machines, welding gear and all i need to do is pay for the material(600$ worth) and hell have one of his professional welders who welds car parts, and motorcycle frames(hes good) put it together for me. i think it sounds like a pretty sweet deal. so does any body have any suggestionson a bike with good geometries to go off
 

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Formerbmx37 said:
well i got this guy that married into my family with a metal shop, im talking metal lathes, cnc machines, welding gear and all i need to do is pay for the material(600$ worth) and hell have one of his professional welders who welds car parts, and motorcycle frames(hes good) put it together for me. i think it sounds like a pretty sweet deal. so does any body have any suggestionson a bike with good geometries to go off
Wow. That sounds like so much fun, I want to build myself a frame some day:yesnod:. What ever geometry you use, make sure your frame has crazy short chainstays:thumbsup: and a low toptube. I love the geometry on my Dobermann Pinscher.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i was thinking about copying atomlabs trailking and getting a 14.5 chainstay thatd be insane. i wonder how much something like my frame would sell for
 

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Formerbmx37 said:
well i got this guy that married into my family with a metal shop, im talking metal lathes, cnc machines, welding gear and all i need to do is pay for the material(600$ worth) and hell have one of his professional welders who welds car parts, and motorcycle frames(hes good) put it together for me. i think it sounds like a pretty sweet deal. so does any body have any suggestionson a bike with good geometries to go off
There are some tools that are quite specific to bike frames (eg alignment tools, stuff for tapping BB threads)- will the welder have access to that kind of stuff?

Another option is to just get a Ti frame made in China and have it shipped over. It'll be made by a company that specialises in bike frames already, so there's less likely to go wrong with details like cable guides or the wrong sized seatpost diameter. And it'll be less than $600 with shipping. I had one made recently, and it's very good.

But hey, if you want to be part of the build process in the shop, then it would be fun to have something knocked up locally.
 

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Formerbmx37 said:
i was thinking about copying atomlabs trailking and getting a 14.5 chainstay thatd be insane. i wonder how much something like my frame would sell for
The high priced frames come from the established custom builders. In which case they are 2000-3000 for an MTB frame. But I wouldn't pay more than a couple of hundred bucks for a used Ti frame made by a non-specialist (too many unknowns).

Don't look at in terms of market value- the cool thing about this frame is that it will be a one of a kind.
 

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Bike tubing is a bit trickier to weld than motorcycle tubing. It's a fair amount thinner. If the welder doesn't have experience with Ti, then he may have a bit of a tough time. All of your miters have to be absolutely fantastically perfect. All of the tubing must have an Argon backpurge (inside the tubes) during welding, and you must flow Argon over the weld from your tig machine during welding to prevent Oxygen contamination. If any oxygen gets into the weld, it will embrittle it and it will crack.

I don't mean to discourage you, but ti's a little trickier than steel.

Why not just buy a steel tubeset and dropouts from Nova Cycles and have him build you a nice steel tubeset. Ti doesn't ride any better than steel. It's simply lighter and corrosion resistant. If you don't get the tubing thicknesses and/or butts right, the frame will be either a) terribly flexy or b) overbuilt and heavier than a steel bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
oh i wasnt looking at trying to sell. and about the tools needed to make it im going old skool and just eye ballin it on a piece of wood. it sounds crazy but i dont even expect my first bike to even function really. im gonna try on chromo and if i like the process of it all then id lay down the money for the jigs and all that junk and maybe get serious. but for now its all just having fun and trying something new
 

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From my experience, titanium seems to be very flexy. I haven't been on one since my bmx days, but I had a ti frame that was very light, but extremely and noticeably flexy. Maybe things have changed or maybe it had to do with ti grade... I'm not sure. But, I would never buy another ti frame without riding it first.

Check out this ti frame from Candida bikes...



 

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Francis Buxton said:
Bike tubing is a bit trickier to weld than motorcycle tubing. It's a fair amount thinner. If the welder doesn't have experience with Ti, then he may have a bit of a tough time. All of your miters have to be absolutely fantastically perfect. All of the tubing must have an Argon backpurge (inside the tubes) during welding, and you must flow Argon over the weld from your tig machine during welding to prevent Oxygen contamination. If any oxygen gets into the weld, it will embrittle it and it will crack.

I don't mean to discourage you, but ti's a little trickier than steel.

Why not just buy a steel tubeset and dropouts from Nova Cycles and have him build you a nice steel tubeset. Ti doesn't ride any better than steel. It's simply lighter and corrosion resistant. If you don't get the tubing thicknesses and/or butts right, the frame will be either a) terribly flexy or b) overbuilt and heavier than a steel bike.
What he said. Most Ti products that is welded are done in a argon rich enviorment. Either in a sealed box or a room. the welder has to have his own air supply. Just make it out of steel. Its stronger and stiffer.
 
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