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Ok, not really a SS topic. Maybe more of a metallurgy question. :rolleyes:

I was just reading about Hadley hubs & noticed that they had a titanium freehub body.

So will a steel cog dig into Ti like it does Al? Or is Ti hard enough to avoid this problem?
 

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The man who fell to earth
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I've been wondering this myself...

I asked this question a little while ago because I'm considering getting an XTR hub with Ti freehub. I was told that a standard DX cog would chew up a Ti freehub...not sure if that's true or not as there wasn't a big response to confirm or refute. The narrow DX cogs are questionable, but a wide based cog should not be a problem at all though.

It would be nice to hear from someone with experience with the DX type cogs...

AOK said:
Ok, not really a SS topic. Maybe more of a metallurgy question. :rolleyes: I was just reading about Hadley hubs & noticed that they had a titanium freehub body. So will a steel cog dig into Ti like it does Al? Or is Ti hard enough to avoid this problem?
 

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Sweep the leg!
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I would say yes but I'd like to know the alloy content of the Ti to be certain... Because 6Al/4V is stronger than 3Al/2.5V it would be better to have 6Al/4V, but that may relate only to it's properties as they relate to tensile strength in normal applications like tubing in a frame... I'd have to think the freehub body is machined from a block of whatever alloy content stock...I used a Ti cogset on my road bike in '94, but only on my stupid light wheels for road races, and they didn't handle the wear well. I forget what brand they are, but they did migrate across the steel freehub body on the Campy Record freehub... but only 1 or 2 mm's over ~2000 miles of racing use.
 

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I don't know the exact hardness of titanium vs the cog, but I would guess that the ti freehub body won't be affected by the steel (or crmo) cog. I always hear that machining titanium parts is very hard on cutting tools - which are steel. So by that reasoning, I would think that a ti freehub body will be fine with a narrow base cog. I'm actually about to find out because I am putting on a set of XTR hubs onto a new ss bike and I plan to use a normal DX cassette cog.
 

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Sweep the leg!
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A buddy with a CNC mill is always *****ing about the costs of his carbide & diamond tooling costing so much... He'll one off things for us but he restricts us to stainless & aluminium for materials.
 

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Caffeine Powered said:
I would say yes but I'd like to know the alloy content of the Ti to be certain... Because 6Al/4V is stronger than 3Al/2.5V it would be better to have 6Al/4V, but that may relate only to it's properties as they relate to tensile strength in normal applications like tubing in a frame... I'd have to think the freehub body is machined from a block of whatever alloy content stock...I used a Ti cogset on my road bike in '94, but only on my stupid light wheels for road races, and they didn't handle the wear well. I forget what brand they are, but they did migrate across the steel freehub body on the Campy Record freehub... but only 1 or 2 mm's over ~2000 miles of racing use.
I'd bet money that the freehub body is 6/4 since that is tougher than 3/2 - brake mount bits, dropouts are made from 6/4 even on 3/2 frames. Shimano's site doesn't show material content for the ti freehub body. If your experience was that ti cogs dug into a steel cassette body, it might be theorized that a steel cog would not dig into a ti freehub body.
 

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Steamroller
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You can afford wide base Ti cogs

I would say if you can afford Hadley hubs you should be able to spring about $45 for a wide based Boone Ti cog. I would not even consider a narrow steel cog. You could use a wide based steel or aluminum one, but for a few $ more you can have the best.

I have a Hadley hubset on my SS 29r and run a HD SS Boone Ti cog I'm certain it will cost less per mile than most any other option.
 
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