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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering what tires work best on rocks and logs - dry and wet. Curious what people have discovered works well for those types of terrain obstacles through trial and experience.


thnx!
 

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well mannered lout
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I did all of two rides on the conti. mt king 2.4's. Just stripped 'em off to go back to the kenda stickies. They're super slow rollers, but nothing holds the wet rocks better.
 

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I mainly ride Kenda small block 8's and kenda blue groove sticke's I also have some Nevegals which I like but always slip on wood although they are the dtc compound and recently I've tried Maxxis Miniuns super sticky they have been great on every thing just a bit slow on climbs so sticky, nice tyres, still think my fav is the Blue groove, this week I've fitted blue groove front and small block 8 rear to see if this combo is a good one. all tyres are 2.35.
 

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MI_canuck said:
Wondering what tires work best on rocks and logs - dry and wet. Curious what people have discovered works well for those types of terrain obstacles through trial and experience.

thnx!
I ride in the Vancouver area. It rains here, ALOT!! I ride on rocks, roots, mud, dirt and lots of wood work.

There area several really good tires that perform well in the wet for riding what you mention in your first post. The key component to the tires is that they are of a soft compound.

The best tires I've found over the years are:

Maxxis Minion DHF soft compound (3C) 2.5"
Michelin Comp 16 2.5"
Michelin Comp 24 2.5"
Kenda Nevegal soft compound DH casing 2.5"
Big Earl Wet compound 2.5" and 2.35" (Tubless ready)

If you are looking for a tire strictly for the wet and don't mind that it is a slow rolling tire and want absolute grip, the Comp 16 is the tire. Run these backwards like a Maxxis HighRoller.

Best tires for wet and dry, Minion DHF on both the front and rear wheels.

The Nevegal is a fabulous all round tire but the Minion beats it in the corners.

The Big Earls are good, but not GREAT, but are damn light with a Kevlar bead and tubeless ready.

The key to grip is the soft compound. Also think about running your tires tubless to increase the tires ability to bite and reduce your flats to ZERO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Well i'm running on Velociraptors right now - and they are amazing in mud and soggy wet soil. (I know most people dislike them, or at least the front - but I'm had some good success with them.) Didn't seem too bad on rocks, or even log piles. But on wet muddy climbs - the mud portions had tons of bite, but the wet roots like you say Luigiugueto, seemed I couldn't get over without slipping. I guess not much can be done to avoid that - i.e that's a problem with any tire?? Maybe dropping pressure a bit is something I can try prior to swapping tires (I was running at 35psi - my riding weight about 190lbs).

My width limit would be about 2.3, maybe 2.35 (not sure if would fit). The Big Earl wet 2.35 doesn't intrigue me (I looked up the tread and looks like that would also be a good all-around pattern for the trails I ride).


cheers

(P.S. - just got back from a ride - the Velociraptors suck on the hardpack - now I'm seeing the 'squirrellyness' that people describe. High tread block with big voids in between. GREAT in the mud. Not so great on the hardpack with a little pea gravel on top... :( )
 

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MI_canuck said:
but the wet roots like you say Luigiugueto, seemed I couldn't get over without slipping. I guess not much can be done to avoid that - i.e that's a problem with any tire?? Maybe dropping pressure a bit is something I can try prior to swapping tires (I was running at 35psi - my riding weight about 190lbs).
I am about your same weight and run about 30-35psi also, sure I can feel the drag but traction is optimized. What you need to do with wet roots while going over them is shift weight. Once you try and pedal over it it'll be a sure slip, maybe even without pedalling it'll slip. It's a matter of technique. What I'd recommend is get an all-around tire, or maybe two.

I ride in similar conditions and switch the rear tire between an IRC VClaw 2.35 and a High Roller 2.35.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
well i was in a local bike shop (supposedly a Maxxis dealer) wanting to check out some Maxxis tires (Minion, High Roller)... but walked out with some Kenda Nevegals DTC's (went with 2.1 - for our MI trails - it's plenty)... Done.

So will be trying them within the next couple days...

One question is - they are rated at 40psi min (65psi max)... what's the risk of pinch flatting if I run them @ 35psi?


cheers
 

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I'm with BobRocket

but now that you've got nevegals, you should know most Norshore riders run pressure as low as possible for increased traction, Pinch flats are rare, unless you tag a sharp edge at speed.

I run 20lbs give or take in the front, the rear can be more but then it can skip.

Experiment to see what works best for you, and if you're worried, just carry some patches. I suspect you'll be fine.

Good luck, Jim

-2 years on old Nevegals on the 'shore with no issues at all. Hmnn, might be time for new?
 

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but I'm guessing people on the north shore ride at least 2.35 tires.
A 2.1 at 40+ psi won't give you the best traction, but I don't think you'll have any trouble, just stay away from head-on steps or ledges at high speeds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Luigi - any thoughts on whether the Nev's 2.1 can go below 40psi?

Also - are only tubeless labeled or UST tires capable or running tubeless? I already have tubeless ready rims. Just curious if running a non-UST tire is a complete no-no, or if it's still possible...


cheers
 

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MI_canuck said:
well i was in a local bike shop (supposedly a Maxxis dealer) wanting to check out some Maxxis tires (Minion, High Roller)... but walked out with some Kenda Nevegals DTC's (went with 2.1 - for our MI trails - it's plenty)... Done.

So will be trying them within the next couple days...

One question is - they are rated at 40psi min (65psi max)... what's the risk of pinch flatting if I run them @ 35psi?

cheers
Hate to say this but, for wet conditions I don't know why they sold you DTCs, since it has sticky rubber on the corners but not the middle tread, so you may still lose traction climbing over wet roots, more than with a Stickee Nevegal or 3C Minion. If you haven't used them yet, can you exchange them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I probably could. I'll check with them. If they don't have Stick-E's in stock, I'll still run the DTC's to see how they perform overall on the trails I ride. I'd assume the Stick-E would be equal or better.

But one question that does come to mind - would running 2.35/2.1 have advantages compared with 2.1/2.1? The 2.35 is about 90-155gr heavier vs the 2.1 DTC.


thnx
 

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Well about the tubeless part, i've only used them once and it was one of those convertions, so I wouldn't be the one to answer that correctly.
About the Nev's, you can, but not much lower. Or else the slightest of rocks will pinchflat you. So you've gotta be careful. How hard are you pretending on riding it?
 

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2.1 and larger

years ago 2.1 was an XC standard. Luigi's right in that those of us on the 'shore run at least 2.35, or 2.5.

The point is, the softer (ie low psi) the tire and the bigger the footprint, the better you stick to a slippery log or rock. The goal is to have as much tire footprint on the ground/rock/log as possible.

A 2.1 tire at 40psi will be slippery by definition, whereas a 2.35 large volume tire at 20psi will be soft, sticky and forgiving. Well, until it breaks traction, and then, thud. You're down.

The rolling resistance of a good 2.35 Nevegal is close to that of a 2.1 tire, so unless you're XC racing, it won't make a difference by weight or rolling resistance.

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Luigiugueto said:
Well about the tubeless part, i've only used them once and it was one of those convertions, so I wouldn't be the one to answer that correctly.
About the Nev's, you can, but not much lower. Or else the slightest of rocks will pinchflat you. So you've gotta be careful. How hard are you pretending on riding it?
Well I'm probably be *pretending* to ride much harder than I *actually* will be ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
JimC. said:
years ago 2.1 was an XC standard. Luigi's right in that those of us on the 'shore run at least 2.35, or 2.5.

The point is, the softer (ie low psi) the tire and the bigger the footprint, the better you stick to a slippery log or rock. The goal is to have as much tire footprint on the ground/rock/log as possible.

A 2.1 tire at 40psi will be slippery by definition, whereas a 2.35 large volume tire at 20psi will be soft, sticky and forgiving. Well, until it breaks traction, and then, thud. You're down.

The rolling resistance of a good 2.35 Nevegal is close to that of a 2.1 tire, so unless you're XC racing, it won't make a difference by weight or rolling resistance.

Jim
OK - good advice. I might look to switch the 2.1 to 2.35 for the front.

(I only wish I was within reach of the North Shore area - sounds & looks (from all the vids) pretty amazing... )

Cheers
 
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