Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
127 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was told that I should run wider tire on the front and smaller on the back for more traction. I am now running my two stock 2.1 kenda nevegal, tubeless(stans tubeless kit).
Should I just keep the rear the way its is and swap the front with 2.35??? Suggestions pls. and tell me what ya'll run on yours and the pros and cons....thanks!
 

·
Mojo0115
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
I am currently on a 2.35 kenda nevegal front and a maxxis ingnitor UST LUST 2.35 on the rear and am really digging the combination so far this winter. I love the nevegals for their traction but they just don't seem to be able to handle my riding terrain on the rear constantly flatting, burping air or even rolling of the rim. Kenda sidewalls don't have a great reputation but you have to love their traction.

How are you finding that your current tires don't have good control? as (no offense) you might find that it is your own skills on the terrain rather than the tires. Are you positioned over the wheels correctly to keep enough traction on the front wheel? Are you washing out in corners or having the tires break free more often than you want.

Whether you switch to a larger size tire or a different tire all together depends a lot on your riding style, the terrain and what is currently feeling bad with your setup.
 

·
Church of the Wheel
Joined
·
749 Posts
I also had tubeless Nevegal 2.1's front and fear on my Mojo as new, and after running a few other tires came back to the Nevegal's, but with 2.1 rear and 2.35 front. They grip and corner exceptionally well for the conditions that I'm riding, but they are noticeably heavier than others, e.g. Continental Speed Kings. There is always a tradeoff. I'm going to try some Stan's Ravens this summer, which is the opposite end of the spectrum.

Before you try switching your rubber up, make sure to play with your air pressure - that alone can make a world of difference. Dropping it will increase your traction, and counterintuitively, it can also decrease your rolling resistance (on rock strewn dirt, not pavement)! But drop it too low and you'll start to feel squirrelly in the corners. Trick is to find that magic place in the middle, and it's likely to be a little different for front and rear tires.

The Nevegals are really good tires. Give them a good chance before you give up on them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,189 Posts
Maxxis High Rollers will give you what you are looking for if you've been on Kenda Nevegals (great tyres).

If you are more that say 170lb and ride fast on rough and rocky tracks then try a 2.35 in the rear and a 2.5 up front. Both of these are available in soft/med and tubeless.

If conditions are dryer than here in the UK ;) I would whole heartedly recommend Maxxis Minions. If you want a tubeless 2.35 setup then you will have to go ghetto with rim strips.

The other area to look at is rim width. Many light weight wheelsets are pretty narrow. My Crossmax XL's and Mavic 819 suffer from this. What happens is you don't get quite the best tyre profile ie tyre sits taller and skinnier and therefore is a bit more prone to roll. My next wheels will probably be built onto a wider rim such as a DT Swiss 5.1 or Stans Arch or Flow. That way I will get the most out of the tyres I like.

But and this is a BIG but, like Sean said, technique is probably where its all happening. Changing to a wider tyre such as a 2.5 High Roller may help you develop the confidence to ride the trails faster and that confidence will carry through as you go back to more XC orientated tyres. I have found this has helped enormously in the past.

Sometimes suspension setup has a bearing on all this. If you are running front or back or both either too firm, too fast or too much compression damping you may feel like you are being pinged about like a pin ball. I normally ran my fork very fast but lately I have found that a bit more rebound (slower) has helped cornering and rougher sections. It has even allowed me to run the forks a bit firmer.

Lots too think about.
 

·
The MTB Lab
Joined
·
2,559 Posts
Tires are a personal product and are very dependent on the local conditions you ride in. I personally find that I prefer the same tire front and rear and the same size. I just feel that having the same combination climbs and corners better. Size is also dependent on where you ride. I prefer the 2.25-2.4 myself for the Colorado conditions I deal with. Lately I have been riding the Conti Mtn King 2.4 Protection. Again, take it with a grain of salt, my local conditions are pretty gravelly, and rocky, and loose. Anyone who has ever dealt with the Pikes Peak pea gravel knows what I am speaking about.
 

·
Reviewer/Tester
Joined
·
6,176 Posts
I really like the Panaracer Rampage tires. When they first came out I ran a side by side test on the Rampage and the Nevegal, and concluded that the Rampage was the better all-round tire of the two, even though the Nevegal had a fraction more outright grip.
I've been running the Rampages ever since, never had any problems with them at all, they are superb tires.


R.
 

·
Guesswho117
Joined
·
254 Posts
I have been running 2.5 Nevegals for the past year on my big bike, Marin Quake 7.3. I like the tires a lot but they don't seem to last very long, 6 months. When I got my Mojo I took the stock 2.1 Nevegals off and replaced them with 2.35 UST High Rollers. I wanted to run wider tires but it turns out the people at Maxxis don't know how to measure tires. The 2.35 High Rollers were actually like 2.1. so I ordered some 2.5 High Rollers which should be like 2.35. I plan on trying the wider tire up front with the smaller tire in the rear to see how it goes. And btw I like the High Rollers a bit better than the Nevegals. They seem to corner a lot better.
 

·
DWlink Fanboy
Joined
·
201 Posts
Motoraptors are beautiful

I have not had experience with Nevegals, and I'm not sure what types of trails you ride. However, if you ride alot of roots and granite (that's pretty much all I ride) at lower speeds, then I can highly recommend WTB Motoraptor race compound. I haven't run these tires at higher speeds (i.e. a ride that averages more than 7mph), so I can't comment on that.

I am running the 2.25s F/R with Stan's Arch rims and anywhere from 15 to 25 psi. They are very sticky on slick rocks, and as long as the snow is not frozen into ice, they work surprisingly well on hardpack snow. In three months of riding, I have not noticed any wear whatsoever.

For a budget choice, most of my riding buddies are running IRC Trailbears in the 2.25. These are incredible tires for the money - you can find them online from $12 to $20 each. The Motoraptors are somewhat better than the Trailbears (which I used to run prior to the Mojo), but it is questionable whether they are $15-$23 per tire better.

Albert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
I run the 2.35 Nevegals F&R pretty much year round (Northern Calif), except for the occasional race when I switch to 2.1 Small Block 8's. I tried the Nevegal 2.35 front & 2.1 rear setup, but I found the rear sliding too much. I found the 2.35s can handle lower pressure than the 2.1s, which helps w/ traction a lot. The Nevegal 2.35 x 2.35 setup is the best I've ever tried.

My only complaint is the Nevegals seem to wear down fairly quickly. I eventually plan to try Maxxis in rear to see if they have comparable traction and longer life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,602 Posts
If traction is what you are looking for, try this. Nevegal 2.1 rear Nevegal 2.35 front in Stickie E. Tubeless with Stans sealant. 26 PSI [ I'm at 150 lbs.] Take a razor blade & cut all of the ramps off the center knobs front & rear tires. I ride mostly muddy offcamber trails with lots of wet roots & big logs, this set up works great. Also climbs in low traction situations are noticably better with the ramps cut off the center knobs.Cutting the ramps off shaves 12 grams per tire, not that I really care about that, but over on the Weight Weenie Forum this would probably be a big hit, although to a true weight weenie running a 2.35 tires is pretty much like running a truck tire on your bike.:thumbsup:
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top