Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Trail Ninja
Joined
·
6,167 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any tricks to make tires tubeless-ready again despite a 1" gash in their sidewall? I got 2 tires needing attention, a Racing Ralph 2.4 EVO Snakeskin and a On-One Chunky Monkey 2.4 (Trail Extreme compound with Eckso). The orange and black patches don't seem to stick, nor do glueless patches or gorilla tape. I think the Orange sealant makes the surface super slick.

Needle, strong string, and a square cutout from a spent inner tube perhaps? Or just run a tube with slime or whatever in it, with a tire boot reinforcing the cut spot? They both needed quite a bit of stan's shaking to make airtight, but I don't want to give up so easily on them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,241 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
+1 on the radial tire repair kit. They are like $5 bucks at any car parts store (Pep Boys, Auto Zone etc.)

Have you thoroughly cleaned the inside of any and all sealant in the patch area, sanded the inside of the casing, applied patch cement and (this is the most important part) let it dry before applying the patch?

These work well for large sidewall cuts
SLIME ? Worldwide Leader in Tire Care ? Repairing a flat tire? Slime Tire & Tube Sealant » Catalog » Catalog Products » Tire Patch Kit for Radial Tires (2030-A)
 

·
Ahhh the pain....
Joined
·
2,566 Posts
Hopefully the slices you have are primarily in the radial direction. I've basically done this to resurrect sliced tires (which we get a lot of in AZ). Sew up the cut with a needle and either thick dental floss or kevlar thread. Some use upholstery thread which also works good. If you can use a baseball stitch, even better. Now you have two choices, you can glue on a tire patch as linked above on the inside of the tire but I've recently been using clear silicone caulk which has proven to work well. Just be sure it's not the acrylic type w a little silicon in it, but true silicone caulk like you'd use to seal a tub. You can also use it to cover up the exposed threads on the outside of the tire too but you'll have to redo it after a half-dozen rides since it's not super abrasion resistant. Alternatively, a little gorilla tape on the outside would be good too. I should also point out that I've found some tires (ie conti's) must have some kind of mold release on them since I can't seem to get any kind of tire patch to stick on the inside of the tire.
Here is a thread I posted a while back that has a bunch of good info on tire fixes.
http://forums.mtbr.com/arizona/fixing-flat-trailside-869758.html
 

·
Is dang happy!
Joined
·
1,379 Posts
The Chunky Monkey is only $27.45 from Planet X UK, just get a new one.
I sewed up a Ardent and used it with a tube on my commuter, was not sure if patch kits would be compatible with Stans fluid.
 

·
Chris Bling
Joined
·
2,585 Posts
As others have said, it can possibly be replaced. For me, it wouldn't be worth riding a tire that I knew was compromised. The price of a new tire is nothing compared to the price of a bad crash/injury due to the tire failing ones its 'repaired'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
482 Posts
i've patched smaller tears with super glue on the outside of the tire...ripped a hole hitting a rock's corner on the tire's maiden voyage...one year later and you can still feel the super glue coat
 

·
Ahhh the pain....
Joined
·
2,566 Posts
I certainly can appreciate the caution voiced here by several when riding a sliced tire. THere are certainly circumstances that would cause me to pitch a tire in the garbage rather than fix it. First, if the slice is large (> 1"). Second, if the slice extends into the tread area. Third, if the slice is in the sidewall and anything but radial in direction (most are). Fourth, if the slice is on the front tire.
Is it a risk? Sure, but if you're careful how you fix them, you can generally get full life out of the tire.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top