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The Knights Who Say "Ni"
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been hearing different things on the forum about different tire pressures for tubeless vs. tubes. I just converted to tubeless, I am 238 lbs, 1-) what pressure should I be riding on? 2-) what kind of gauge do most of you use?
 

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This is highly subjective. It can also depend on the tyre/rim combination and method of conversion.

Here is my unique situation:

I am about 20lbs lighter. I run WTB Nano Raptor 2.1 with folding bead front and rear on Velocity Blunt rims. I use the split 26" tube Ghetto method and my own home made sealant. Low 20s front and high 20s PSI rear.

Never run this type of conversion above 30 PSI. I consider it 100% successful and recomend it to anyone. I don't think your too heavy for my set up.

As for the gauge, I use the one on my floor pump. How accurate it is I do not know.

Stand bye for more unique accounts of tubeless conversion. They are many in number. Hopefully one will sound just like yours. Generally I think you will be a success and probably are already. You may also benefit from a thread titles only search of the the 29er forum for "tubeless".

Best of luck with your tubeless riding.
 

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The Knights Who Say "Ni"
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111 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
MagicCarpet said:
This is highly subjective. It can also depend on the tyre/rim combination and method of conversion.

Here is my unique situation:

I am about 20lbs lighter. I run WTB Nano Raptor 2.1 with folding bead front and rear on Velocity Blunt rims. I use the split 26" tube Ghetto method and my own home made sealant. Low 20s front and high 20s PSI rear.

Never run this type of conversion above 30 PSI. I consider it 100% successful and recomend it to anyone. I don't think your too heavy for my set up.

As for the gauge, I use the one on my floor pump. How accurate it is I do not know.

Stand bye for more unique accounts of tubeless conversion. They are many in number. Hopefully one will sound just like yours. Generally I think you will be a success and probably are already. You may also benefit from a thread titles only search of the the 29er forum for "tubeless".

Best of luck with your tubeless riding.
I am running Bontrager 29-3 Team tires, and Velocity blunt rims with Bontrager TLR rim strips..(sealant is combination Super juice and Tubeless slime).

Is there a handheld pressure gauge too so I don't have to bring a floor pump?
 

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Tire pressure depends on riding conditions, rim, and tire choice. I use the slime digital gauge. I'm anal about my tire pressure.
 

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You have to figure out what pressure works best for you. The most obvious factors are your weight, and the tubeless tires. Obviously because it's tubeless, you can run a lower air pressure than with tubes, but you're a big guy so you can't go too low.

However, the type of tire will also have an effect. Some tires are more supple than others; that is, some tires have the ability to follow the terrain better, or roll over more in the corners. A specific tire pressure may work well with one tire, but might be either too soft or to firm for another.

Also, how you ride plays an effect. If you're a hard charging dude, you're going to want a little more pressure than a guy who's just cruising. This has largely to due with cornering. The faster you corner, the higher the loads are that are seen in the tires, thus a higher the air pressure will be required to keep the tire from folding over or pulling off the rim.

Bottom line - start at the tire pressure you were at before tubeless. Lower it 4-5psi each time you ride. When you notice the rim bottoming on that rock or root, or you feel the bike start to give out when in the corners, add some air pressure.
 

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newskoolbiker said:
Bottom line - start at the tire pressure you were at before tubeless. Lower it 4-5psi each time you ride. When you notice the rim bottoming on that rock or root, or you feel the bike start to give out when in the corners, add some air pressure.
I suggest something similar. Start slightly high. Gradually lower your pressures with just a quick tap on the valve stem. When you get too low, check your pressure then add back a PSI or two and you've found your sweet spot.

I usually set my rear pressure based on when my traction stops breaking on a steep and loose climb. I base my front pressure on downhill cornering or rutty terrain, like NewsKool suggests.
 

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Just a little feedback from my own experience. I weigh 220 lbs with gear. I ride WTB Weirwolf LT 2.55's on Flows, 36psi. I was on a trail last Saturday on a climb when I came upon a large rock. I pulled up my front to climb the rock, but somehow landed on it a little bit sideways (tire going sideways, rest of bike going forward, kinda like a taco-inducing situation). The front tire burped enough air out that I had to stop and pump it back up.

YMMV. Just be prepared to handle the situation. :)
 

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bicycle rider
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2,718 Posts
210lbs naked
2.35 Rampages
Flow rims
tubeless
aggressive, technical riding at night, fire roads by day
32 rear 30 front

Sometimes I let it bleed down less and I love the ride around say 28, but I've also unseated a tire on a root at high speed and done a superman at night with lower pressures, so now I play it safe.

I have a digital pressure gauge or two, but mostly go by what my Park floor pump reads.

Morgan
 

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Underskilled
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4,750 Posts
I used to be 240lb dropped to 210, but now back to judo weight at 220.

Anyway I have ridden as low as 8 and high as 40 front and back.
WWlt 2.55 on Kris Holm FR rims.

8 psi was fun, but bottomed to rim too easily.

I normally ride 20 front 35 back now.

hope that helps
 
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