Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm still trying to dial in my new Stumpy fsr comp Santa brought me this year and I've finally got the seat height right. Now I'm working on tire pressure. I'm 6'3, 215lbs riding a size L w/ "The Captin" S works tires. Anyone out their my size find the right tire pressure for them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
almost

i have an 08 SJ w/ captains and about 200lb with gear

First the S-works tires don't last, side walls are really thin, I replaced them with the control version and have been good since.

I run 40-45 psi, and have found them to work really well all year.
under 35 poo poo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,787 Posts
35 is the minimum pressure rating for those tires, so if you go under 35 you'll see the cross-hatches form on the sidewalls and be more susceptible to splits.

I'm 6'3 200 and run 38 psi front and rear with the Captain Control 2bliss (running tubeless also). For you I'd say start at 40psi and if you see cross hatching on the sidewalls, up it by 5 psi and try again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
Unless there is a specfic reason to run the Captains so high, I would go about 35-36PSI and not a bit over that. Unless you are riding on the road running higher pressures than 35 PSI is no good
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Tire pressure

Guys,
I'm 6' 180# 2009 S-Works, I run the S-works tubeless. My question is how can any of you guys run the same pressure all the time. I adjust per trail and per trail I'm on conditions at the time. Arizona BCT today was 42 x 42. Last week rode decomposed granite area and rode 36 front 40 rear.?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
man you guys love those high pressures, all they ever do for me is make the bike bounce and skip, doesn't do much for traction or pedalling efficiency. To each their own!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
Less pressure = better grip = you actually go faster.

The Stan's No Tubes website used to have a comparison where they showed that a tire around 25 psi rolled faster over bumpy terrain than one around 40. The difference is that the lower pressure soaks up more and doesn't jostle the bike around. You can go faster when your bike is connected to the ground.

Yes, you have a higher chance of pinch flatting when using a tube. Yes, you should convert to tubeless using the Stan's kit. Yes, it works with the DT 420 SL rims. Yes, you'll go faster and have more control. Yes, it's pretty forgiving when you only do the "squeeze test" before you ride and then you find out the front tire is at 10 psi this morning when I loaded up and decided to actually fill it.

6'5", 215, Stumpy FSR Comp, XL, riding in the Pac N'West.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Less pressure=Pinch flats, good suspension+good rider+ good set up=go fast-jostling
Less pressure=climb slower=no trophies or podiums, go home sad.
Tubeless=fastest same tires more pressure= go even faster
Riding in Arizona rocks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
more pressure works well on a road bike or for any tire that will be on the road or some very smooth packed firetrail.

On anything that resembles a REAL mountain bike trail, lower pressure equals faster rolling and more traction.

Saying that some tires specifically like lower pressures, and some smaller volume tires possibly like the captains like a bit more pressure.

IMO anything over 36-38 PSI is too much air pressure and is for people who think that they need every little thing to help them get more energy/faster on climbing. What they don't realize is that the negatives outweigh any positives, again unless you're riding some really boring stuff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,787 Posts
Yody said:
more pressure works well on a road bike or for any tire that will be on the road or some very smooth packed firetrail.

On anything that resembles a REAL mountain bike trail, lower pressure equals faster rolling and more traction.

Saying that some tires specifically like lower pressures, and some smaller volume tires possibly like the captains like a bit more pressure.

IMO anything over 36-38 PSI is too much air pressure and is for people who think that they need every little thing to help them get more energy/faster on climbing. What they don't realize is that the negatives outweigh any positives, again unless you're riding some really boring stuff
It depends on the tire as well. When I've run the Captain Controls under 35 psi, the sidewalls get damaged and split over time. Probably why the minimum pressure rating for that tire is 35psi. On a tire with a thicker sidewall I'd definitely run less pressure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
717 Posts
Mr Yogi,
And what do you specifically mean "real MTB trails" I'll call you out on that, come to AZ and I'll make you and your underinflated tires beg for the pacific coast loam and burnt roots
Chipolopolo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
chipolopolo said:
Mr Yogi,
And what do you specifically mean "real MTB trails" I'll call you out on that, come to AZ and I'll make you and your underinflated tires beg for the pacific coast loam and burnt roots
Chipolopolo
Run tubeless then and low pressure, if you're worried about pinch flats on rocks. Even better
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,378 Posts
nachomc said:
It depends on the tire as well. When I've run the Captain Controls under 35 psi, the sidewalls get damaged and split over time. Probably why the minimum pressure rating for that tire is 35psi. On a tire with a thicker sidewall I'd definitely run less pressure.
Agreed, my friend is running the captains on his SJ Expert and he tried sub 35 and it didn't look very efficient which is why I mentioned that diff tires are different. He's 240 pounds and I believe he found about 36-38 to be just about perfect
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top