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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently bought a used bike to get back into riding. The rear tire is a Kenda Nevegal and I noticed the arrow was pointing towards the rear of the bike and the ramps on the lugs are facing the back. Should I remount the tire or do I even need to worry about it? Thanks.
 

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You don't have to remount it.

Your braking power will be reduced, and the tire wont roll as efficiently, but that is basically it for "problems".

Your driving traction should be better though.
 

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Ramped knobs on a rear tire bother me conceptually because of this.

I don't know if they do anything in practice, though. :p
As far as braking power, yes, it should make a difference.

A very common practice in the motocross world is for riders to turn their tire around.
The drive side of the knobs on the rear tire take a monsterous beating under 50-60 hp bikes. More beginner riders, or more weekend warriors will turn the tire around, so they get a fresh square knob to accelerate. This puts the rounded "ramped" side of the knob however on the braking edge of the tire.

When I first started riding moto, I used to do that, because tires were 50-80 bucks, and you would only get two months or so out of a tire if you were racing as a beginner.
One race, I was coming into the first turn off the start, and I had just switched my tire around. Well, I went to put on the rear brake, and the rear of the bike just locked up and skated. I bounced off of some poor guy, and almost crashed.

I never turned tires around any more after that.

So yes, ramped knobs turned around should really affect the braking.
But again, the rear of the bike is what is driving, of course. Having ramped knobs on the drive side will decrease forward drive traction.
Front tire, it doesn't matter, since there is no driving force on the ramps, only rolling, and braking force.
 

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I know a few friends that mount their rear tires backwards. Gives them a little more bite on climbs. If you do a ride with lots of climbing, then i'd leave it the way it is. If you're more into a flowing type trail riding, then i'd mount it the right way.
 

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I recently noticed i had mounted my tires the wrong way around after i had removed them to repair punctures. I just re-installed them the right way. Could'nt tell you if there's much of a difference i've noticed, but if they've bothered to put the direction on the tire, then there's probably a reason. Mayswell do it the correct way, it doesn't take long.
 

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There's no "Right or Wrong", really. There's just "Whatever works for you".

I've had several tyres that have opposite arrow-indicators for mounting them front or rear.
 

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Continental Grand Prix 4000s, my favorite road tire, have a direction indicator on them even though the only tread pattern is some shallow sipes on the shoulders, too far out to be part of the contact patch most of the time.

Continental technical support says they're only there to get people to stop calling and asking which way to mount them, and don't actually do anything.

I'm a little willing to buy that ramped knobs do something, and since I want good edges on my rear tire for both driving the bike up a loose climb and braking, there's my distaste. I say it bothers me conceptually because I haven't really experienced them performing differently on my mountain bike. But I don't think Schwalbe ramps any of its tires and because they sponsor my team, they're the only MTB tire I buy lately.
 
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