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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I have recently gotten into Mountain Biking (2 months or so). Of course like any newbie I was so into the sport that I didn't do my research so I need help if possible.

I use to ride on the Upper Trail of Tampa Bay (all paved) until I wanted to get more into the sport and ride real trails (Alafia River State Park, etc.). I went into a bike store and I told them that I would like something good for trail and pave as well. They recommended the Giant Revel 29er (Revel 29er (2014) - Bikes | Giant Bicycles | United States) to which I ended up getting. I am happy with the bike. I am 6'1ft tall and weight 230lb (muscle). The first few times of course I crashed because I have never been on an actual trail (I've been now 4 times since purchasing this bike). Each time I get more comfortable and am crashing less. I was able to climb more hills the last time with ease, so I am assuming this is because I am learning more and becoming more comfortable with the gears and when to change them and when not to, etc.

My question/concern is this. Should I immediately thing about going to a 27.5 or a 26, or should I continue for another few months with my 29 and then bring up the topic again? Because I've heard from everyone that of course everyone crashes at first, and with time I will get use to the sport and become better. Any input, opinion, advice, ANYTHING would be greatly appreciated... lol
. Thanks in advance.
 

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Don't worry about anything for at least a year. Right now you're still in the process of getting used to how the bike handles, and finding what both your and the bike's limits are. Don't let others cloud your mind with wheel sizes and parts and all that, just ride and have fun! :)


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Yeah its way too soon to think about a change as big as wheel size. And, to a large extent, the wheel size has nothing to do with you crashing or feeling uncomfortable on the bike. Its just the growing pains of learning how to mountain bike. Get out there and ride the wheels off.
 

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You shouldn't be constantly crashing. You are going too fast or on the wrong trail. You need to step back, check your skills and ride smarter. You will wreck your bike or yourself.
Practice the moves that are giving you trouble, read a book, checkout videos on the Internet.
Go out on some store or other organized rides and see how other people ride the same trails.
 

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^^^ agree... and wheel size will not stop or reduce crashing.

Details on how/types of crashes e.g. washing out front wheel would be helpful. Also, watch the skills videos located in the beginners forum.
 

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great starter bike. Stick with it and it will get better. I'd think the only real problem you'd have with that bike is the fork bouncing really bad when you hit stuff. Nature of a cheap fork. For now, learn to unweight the front of your bike when you are about to hit stuff so the bike doesn't throw you around as much. Once it wears out and you think the fork really holds you back from hitting stuff faster, consider a better fork. Lots of forks on sale in the fall.
 

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Suntour designed your fork for bike paths only. Lots of riders end up over riding it. Many give up and list those bike with almost no miles on Cragslist. Nick at Suntour has an upgrade option to a real fork. $200 gets you a Raidon air fork that drops a good chunk of weight of the front as a bonus.
http://forums.mtbr.com/beginners-corner/if-you-want-upgrade-your-suntour-fork-830657-28.html
You get adjustable rebound damping and more than a spring for internals.
Your lbs hasn't done you any favors.
Do a demo day when one comes to your area to get some relevant experience.
 

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Don't worry about anything for at least a year. Right now you're still in the process of getting used to how the bike handles, and finding what both your and the bike's limits are. Don't let others cloud your mind with wheel sizes and parts and all that, just ride and have fun! :)


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Great advise! I wish someone told be that when I first started. It would save me a lot of money and time for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you all very much for the advice and tips. Each one was very helpful.

For now I am not going to get discouraged and just continue to enjoy the sport and lay back and stop getting ahead of myself. I am going to practice the moves and get better. Thank you all very much for the help and for taking the time to not only read my issue but also for the input. Thanks again.


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