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Hello, I have recently gotten into Mountain Biking (2 months or so). Of course like any newbie I was so into the sport that I didn't do my research so I need help if possible.

I use to ride on the Upper Trail of Tampa Bay (all paved) until I wanted to get more into the sport and ride real trails (Alafia River State Park, etc.). I went into a bike store and I told them that I would like something good for trail and pave as well. They recommended the Giant Revel 29er (Revel 29er (2014) - Bikes | Giant Bicycles | United States) to which I ended up getting. I am happy with the bike. I am 6'1ft tall and weight 230lb (muscle). The first few times of course I crashed because I have never been on an actual trail (I've been now 4 times since purchasing this bike). Each time I get more comfortable and am crashing less. I was able to climb more hills the last time with ease, so I am assuming this is because I am learning more and becoming more comfortable with the gears and when to change them and when not to, etc.

My question/concern is this. Should I immediately thing about going to a 27.5 or a 26, or should I continue for another few months with my 29 and then bring up the topic again? Because I've heard from everyone that of course everyone crashes at first, and with time I will get use to the sport and become better. Any input, opinion, advice, ANYTHING would be greatly appreciated... lol :thumbsup:. Thanks in advance.
 

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Why do you want to move to a 26-27.5? Is it the crashing thing? If so, the first thing to work on is technique. I would watch some videos (Sticky at top of forum) and maybe pick up the book Mastering Mountain Bike Skills...it is available as a digital download via amazon.
 

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The bike is fine,you need more saddle time. Check for a bike skills class,or shop rides,or meetup.com to find people to ride with .You can learn allot by watching someone else. Tone of videos on youtube for how to do stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Why do you want to move to a 26-27.5? Is it the crashing thing? If so, the first thing to work on is technique. I would watch some videos (Sticky at top of forum) and maybe pick up the book Mastering Mountain Bike Skills...it is available as a digital download via amazon.
It is the crashing, to which each time I go it gets less so I am thinking as you said it is my technique which I assume will improve over time (so I hope... lol)... I will definitely look at the book, thanks a lot in advance.

The bike is fine,you need more saddle time. Check for a bike skills class,or shop rides,or meetup.com to find people to ride with .You can learn allot by watching someone else. Tone of videos on youtube for how to do stuff.
As soon as I joined mountain biking I joined my local bike group (SWAMP) to which they do offer classes. I think I am going to take some up to help me out.

Thank you both very much for taking the time to reply.
 

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It is the crashing, to which each time I go it gets less so I am thinking as you said it is my technique which I assume will improve over time (so I hope... lol)... I will definitely look at the book, thanks a lot in advance.



As soon as I joined mountain biking I joined my local bike group (SWAMP) to which they do offer classes. I think I am going to take some up to help me out.

Thank you both very much for taking the time to reply.
I remember way back (9 months ago) when everyone said that a 29'er will fix every problem you have an is the solution to every biking trail, region, and style. Now everyone is saying the same thing about 27.5. The short answer is that it's never about the bike, it's about the rider. 29'ers are very desirable in many parts of the country in many varied types of terrain. Wheel size has little to do with the overall feel of a bike anyway, a bike is defined by its geometry more than its wheel size. You might find yourself happier on one size compared to the others.

You have a perfectly good bike so go ride it. Eventually you might feel like you've outgrown the Revel in terms of your skill set, your prefered type of riding, or your expectations and at that time it will be a good thing to go investigate your wheel size options. Probably by then we'll be arguing 24" vs 32" as to which is the new hotness. As always with choosing a new bike you need to ride as many options as you can get your hands on and choose the one you like riding the most. It doesn't matter what wheel size or what parts are attached to it so long as you like riding it.
 

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What causes the majority of your crashes? Crashing is part of the sport, whether you're an XC or a trail rider of 10 years or of 10 days. Granted, the crashes are less for the more experienced rider, but it still happens. So don't let the fact that you crash often sway you into the direction of thinking you need a new bike. A 26" wheeled bike probably won't make you crash any less. Just keep riding what you have and build your skills. Search around YouTube on certain techniques and go and practice them such as riding switchbacks, which a lot of newbies tend to crash on.
 

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You can spend up to a few hundreds and add a dropper post to make your descend easier, or spend that same few hundreds and take some mountain bike clinic, or do both for the fastest learning. Mountain biking is an equal opportunity pain giver, it does not matter what wheel size you are riding, if you crash you'd feel the same pain:)
 
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