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Ibis Ripley V4
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I personally would probably go with the 30mm rim. It will fit the 2.6's and will be great with the 2.4's.

2.4's on the 35mm rims might start to square off a bit too much.
 

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Road for about 8 miles today and 1200ft of climbing on mostly tame up and down single track with the short patch of rock and root gardens.. I love this thing so much.. Lugging a 30 pound bike up the hills make my 16 pound Aspero feel like nothing climbing during the big ride days. Oh and funny thing.. I think water bottles and muddy MTBing dont mix.. maybe its time for a small camelbak setup...
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Stupid suspension questions: I have the RockShox Sektor Fork on my XT build and ordered a fork pump (should get it Friday) I cant find an actual manual that explains how it works.. Rockshox seems to generalize them all based on features such as debonair or whatever.

1. the air valve cap, is there a special tool to remove this.. Its seems to be on there tight and cant unscrew the cap by hand

2. other than Full open and Full lock out, what the heck are the 3 or 4 clicks in between mean?

3. From my understanding I first set my air pressure then I set the rebound screw to the clicks I want it at afterwards on the right bottom of the fork?

As for performance, I could not tell the difference between a good fork and a bad one.. reading through the 3000+ posts, its seems the recon and my Sektor are both crap.. I cant tell, it seems to work for me on downhill rock gardens..

Im a 180lbs, was going to go for 100 PSI and -17 clicks
 

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Ibis Ripley V4
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Stupid suspension questions: I have the RockShox Sektor Fork on my XT build and ordered a fork pump (should get it Friday) I cant find an actual manual that explains how it works.. Rockshox seems to generalize them all based on features such as debonair or whatever.

1. the air valve cap, is there a special tool to remove this.. Its seems to be on there tight and cant unscrew the cap by hand

2. other than Full open and Full lock out, what the heck are the 3 or 4 clicks in between mean?

3. From my understanding I first set my air pressure then I set the rebound screw to the clicks I want it at afterwards on the right bottom of the fork?

As for performance, I could not tell the difference between a good fork and a bad one.. reading through the 3000+ posts, its seems the recon and my Sektor are both crap.. I cant tell, it seems to work for me on downhill rock gardens..

Im a 180lbs, was going to go for 100 PSI and -17 clicks
1: To remove the air valve cap, just have to muscle up and remove it. They seem to magically tighten themselves over time and I have to use a rag and a pair of pliers on occasion.

2: That knob is for your Low Speed Compression (LSC). LSC basically refers to how the fork reacts and how easily it allows itself to compress when the fork is moving at lower speeds. Full open, the fork will allow itself to compress easily. Each click toward full closed will make the fork feel firmer. Many people see this as Open = descending, in between = "trail", closed = lockout. More advanced forks than the Sektor will typically have Low Speed Compression and High Speed Compression adjustments. Keep in mind, this is not in direct reference to how fast the BIKE is moving, but how fast the suspension is being asked to move.

3: Rockshox will give baseline, suggested settings. You're typically better off going off of sag for your pressure. Just sitting static on the bike you should use about 20-30% of the forks travel, the travel used just taking your weight is called "sag". More sag will give a softer feeling fork, less sag a firmer feeling fork. Once you set the pressure, dial in rebound to baseline settings. Now go ride the bike. Once you get some miles in, adjust pressure and rebound to suit your needs. If you feel like you're on a pogo stick and the suspension wants to shoot up too fast, slow down rebound. If you find the fork is "packing down", successive hits are blowing through your travel, speed up rebound. If you feel like your fork is blowing through its travel too easily, add air pressure. If your fork feels too stiff and rough, remove air pressure. I think the Sektor can take air volume spacers as well. These are good if you want to add progressivity to your suspension (as you use travel, it gets harder to bottom out). Typically this allows you to run lower pressure to keep small bump compliance, but the fork does not want to bottom out easily.
 

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Do most folks tend to love or hate the Alternator dropouts? Do they stay quiet? Do they require frequent maintenance to keep them quiet and aligned?

As I continue my search for a 29er hardtail, the Timberjack remains on my shortlist but I am conflicted about the Alternator dropouts because I will never run this bike as a singlespeed.
 

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Do most folks tend to love or hate the Alternator dropouts? Do they stay quiet? Do they require frequent maintenance to keep them quiet and aligned?

As I continue my search for a 29er hardtail, the Timberjack remains on my shortlist but I am conflicted about the Alternator dropouts because I will never run this bike as a singlespeed.
Ok Ill take a stab contributing since as a new TJ owner I have only asked questions.. But I have been a DIY bike mechanic/ maintenance guy for 15 years if that helps :)

The TJs alternator dropouts aren't just about the option to run single speed.. Its a capability that allows the TJ to be versatile in many more ways. For example:

1. Yes run single speed
2. sliding drop outs allows you to run a longer or shorter Chainstay length for different ride characteristics.
3. Different alternator plates can be used to run a variety of hub specs, such as 12x142, 12x148, QR 10x140 etc..

so dont think of it as a nice to have for just single speed use, it opens the ability for multiple wheelset hub types and adjustment of ride characteristics.. To my knowledge a few bikes have sliding drop outs, however, many do not have the ability to customize hub sizes like the TJ.
 

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...reading through the 3000+ posts, its seems the recon and my Sektor are both crap.. I cant tell, it seems to work for me on downhill rock gardens..
If you are used to premium stuff they are heavy and lackluster... but if you are used to Suntour XCT or worse forks on $500 bikes, they are AMAZING. Progressive spring, and damping that's not only present, but different in one direction than the other

My main beef is that on the $2000 bike the fork is a dead end model that can only be serviced and not a Reba or Rev that could be upgraded and repaired. I hope they don't show up with that RS 35 next year, no hardtail should have to lug that thing around
 

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If you are used to premium stuff they are heavy and lackluster... but if you are used to Suntour XCT or worse forks on $500 bikes, they are AMAZING. Progressive spring, and damping that's not only present, but different in one direction than the other

My main beef is that on the $2000 bike the fork is a dead end model that can only be serviced and not a Reba or Rev that could be upgraded and repaired. I hope they don't show up with that RS 35 next year, no hardtail should have to lug that thing around
$2200 and throw a pike on it.

That would put it near some other premium HT's.
 

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The wheelset are kinda boat anchors too, right? So, a better front Sus and decent wheels, then the specs would probably blow away any other brands top of the line HT
 

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Ibis Ripley V4
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The TJ is awesome with premium parts matched to it. When I ran mine with a Pike, I9 Hydra Enduro S wheels and Shimano XT parts it was very versatile and capable.

If the frames were actually available, I would be very tempted to build another one up for myself.
 

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The TJ is awesome with premium parts matched to it. When I ran mine with a Pike, I9 Hydra Enduro S wheels and Shimano XT parts it was very versatile and capable.

If the frames were actually available, I would be very tempted to build another one up for myself.
Sweet, I am loving it so far. My goal for my TJ is to get it sub 26 pounds (eventually) as I am riding this as mostly a xc/trail style bike. Plan is for long days, lots of climbing and no crazy enduro style drops or jumping :)
 

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The wheelset are kinda boat anchors too, right?
They are if your goal is 26#. You are going to need some nice carbon XC wheels and tires and a 32SC or Sid, and lighter drivetrain choices like XX1.

For me it's not that kind of bike, it's a trail bike and not an XC or race bike, and I'm not going to worry a lot about weight as long as I can rely on it.
 

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They are if your goal is 26#. You are going to need some nice carbon XC wheels and tires and a 32SC or Sid, and lighter drivetrain choices like XX1.

For me it's not that kind of bike, it's a trail bike and not an XC or race bike, and I'm not going to worry a lot about weight as long as I can rely on it.
I agree with you, its not that kind of bike, and I definitely wont throw wasted money at it unless it is a true upgrade. Honestly the only thing I plan to do as I find deals are the following (after that whatever it weighs it will stay that way):

1. XT 165mm crank arms
2. 29er wheelset with 2.4 or 2.5 rubber
3. Better front sus when I get decent enough to know what that even means :)
4. XT level chain and cassette when the SLX ones wear out..

bars, stand saddle are personal and fit oriented so we will see what happens as i ride it. But for now im having a blast

so far down to 30.78lbs after going tubeless with accessories installed
 
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