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JORBA: Six Mile Run
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Im looking to get a new post for my hardtail. The aluminum post I have now is just to stiff. How does a Ti seatpost compare to carbon as far as damping bumps and vibrations. Any experiences with this topic would be appreciated.
 

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I currently ride ti and have ridden a lot of aluminum seatposts and honestly can't really tell the difference. Marketing would say that ti has more flex and bounce for a smoother ride. But I would say the CF is definitely the most stiff as everything thing else I've ever seen in CF is stiffer than hell. People also report a lot of CF seatpost failures. Personally, I think the saddle has a lot to do with the ride quality. I ride a SDG Bel Air that some think is too cushy for serious riding but this is the nicest riding saddle I have ever tried.
 

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Well I have an Easton EC-70 carbon seatpost....yeah you can tell it takes some of the ping out of the ride, but the damned thing wont stay put. I would advise against it on any trail bike, maybe on an SS.....Let me add that I am not stupid as I work at a bike shop and have tried everything including light light emery cloth to the carbon resin and the inner seat tube diameter with no luck....looking forward to trying something new. there is a slight change that it could be my post collar I will find out soon but It held all other posts just fine.....
PS about every thompson owner seems to be very proud.
 

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Wobbegong said:
Im looking to get a new post for my hardtail. The aluminum post I have now is just to stiff. How does a Ti seatpost compare to carbon as far as damping bumps and vibrations. Any experiences with this topic would be appreciated.
None of the post will dampen bumps to any significant degree. The carbon post may dampen vibration a bit, but I've never been able to tell the difference....maybe if you ride on a saddle with no padding.

A carbon frame or ti frame would make a difference, but not the post, imo. A good saddle will make a far bigger difference than a post.
 

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i have the bel air also...

primetime4 said:
I currently ride ti and have ridden a lot of aluminum seatposts and honestly can't really tell the difference. Marketing would say that ti has more flex and bounce for a smoother ride. But I would say the CF is definitely the most stiff as everything thing else I've ever seen in CF is stiffer than hell. People also report a lot of CF seatpost failures. Personally, I think the saddle has a lot to do with the ride quality. I ride a SDG Bel Air that some think is too cushy for serious riding but this is the nicest riding saddle I have ever tried.
and it does smooth out the ride some. before that i had the koobi prs which is nice but the sdg is a little better. if you look up the reviews of ti posts most claim to feel a significant difference from alu. same with carbon, though many report having failures.
 

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Huh???

Guital2 said:
Well I have an Easton EC-70 carbon seatpost....yeah you can tell it takes some of the ping out of the ride, but the damned thing wont stay put. I would advise against it on any trail bike, maybe on an SS.....Let me add that I am not stupid as I work at a bike shop and have tried everything including light light emery cloth to the carbon resin and the inner seat tube diameter with no luck....looking forward to trying something new. there is a slight change that it could be my post collar I will find out soon but It held all other posts just fine.....
PS about every thompson owner seems to be very proud.
Why would it be any better on a signlespeed?
 

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JORBA: Six Mile Run
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Discussion Starter #7
I have a Thomson.....

Guital2 said:
Well I have an Easton EC-70 carbon seatpost....yeah you can tell it takes some of the ping out of the ride, but the damned thing wont stay put. I would advise against it on any trail bike, maybe on an SS.....Let me add that I am not stupid as I work at a bike shop and have tried everything including light light emery cloth to the carbon resin and the inner seat tube diameter with no luck....looking forward to trying something new. there is a slight change that it could be my post collar I will find out soon but It held all other posts just fine.....
PS about every thompson owner seems to be very proud.
I have a thomson on my FS bike and it is a terrific post. I'm looking for something to absorb shock. Thats why Im looking into a Ti seatpost.

I'd imagine the amount of post showing would make a difference because of the leverage your weight would have to flex the seatpost. I think I will give the Moots Ti post a shot.
 

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Wobbegong said:
I have a thomson on my FS bike and it is a terrific post. I'm looking for something to absorb shock. Thats why Im looking into a Ti seatpost.
Seatposts are pretty stiff structures, ESPECIALLY carbon fiber ones, that material is exceptionally stiff in the directions it sees force on the bike, in other words carbon fiber doesn't like to bend and is real stiff. Will TI or carbon fiber dampen" certain amplitudes? Sure, and so will metals and other materials. Will it really "absorb shock" and soften a ride? No. Think about the amplitude of virbrations that a tuning fork sees, it is completely different than smacking a rigid fork into a rock. They can both be "vibrations", but the amplitude is way different. Short and small waves vs big and long or even big and big. It's a huge range and just because a material "absorbs" some amplitudes doesn't mean you're going to notice anything or that it will ride smooth.
 

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a good saddle and possibly a light short-travel suspension post sounds like the ticket. Otherwise I have a Ti Synchros post from waaaay back that I always liked. It's just like a Thomson but with a pressed in head as opposed to 1-piece machined. You can still find them in 27.2 from time to time at some shops or online.
 

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I make my own seat posts for a smooth ride. It works pretty well too, I like it.

I use 1 wood pole and two layers of aluminum tubing around it (soft aluminum tubing). The Aluminum tubing keeps the wood from breaking and the wood provides a REALLY nice smooth ride. Only draw back is that you have to custom make a seat attachment piece or get one of the old school seat clamps that bolt around the seat post (what I use).

One great thing is that you can make custom posts that are super long. This will let you get the seat way up without putting much stress on the bike frame, due to the extra amount of tubing in the seat tube. It doesn't weigh much either, compared to aluminum posts of similar length, but feels much better.

I use this method for my Freeride bike. Since I'm 6'4" and ride a 15 inch tall HT frame, I needed A LOT of seat post for climbing up mountains. I didn't like having to ride with 2 inches of post in the frame while there over a foot of exposed aluminum post above it wrenching away. I made a custom post that barely touches the Bottom Bracket when the seat is all the way down.

I have yet to bend or break it even with doing big drops and landing with my ass on the seat.

All you need is to go to the wood dowl and aluminum tubing section of the hardware store. THey already have the perfect sizes that all fit into eachother. Just cut, and put two bolts through the near top of it and it's ready to go!

Ghetto, but works, and is cheap, so worth a try.
 

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MicroHuck said:
I'm 6'4" and ride a 15 inch tall HT frame, I needed A LOT of seat post for climbing up mountains.
I would love to see a photo of that bike if you've got it handy mate.

Cheers
 

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Ti post here

I bought a Dean ti post to replace my Thomson right before I went down to Costa Rica for the La Ruta. It made a big difference. The last day of the race the course goes right down the middle of some old RR tracks for countless miles. I was able to ride seated almost the whole time.
I will qualify this by including that I was on a ti frame with UST wheels, and I ran about 25 psi in the rear, and a Specialized Alias saddle. Coming off the alu post I could definitely feel the difference. No, it is not as plush as suspension, but you can tell it is there. I have NO regrets with the purchase.
 

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er....

Guital2 said:
Wont be riding as hard on it....
You haven't ridden a SS, have you? SS puts more stress on your components and frame than a geared bike does. You should probably not have mentioned that you worked in a bike shop.

Ken
 

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I've been using a Specialized Pave carbon road post on my old hardtail (before it dies) and rigid SS for a couple years not and notice a significant vibration absorbtion difference over the AL posts that I own (2 Thomsons, a Kore, and a USE). Best HT post I've used yet.

That said, it comes with a big warning "For Road Use Only." I told a Specialized rep that I was doing so and he recommended I stop or risk death.
 

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The only way you will significantly dampen bumps with a seatpost is to get a suspension post. Vibrations can be dampened by a carbon post, but not bumps. There are two primary vectors that affect a seatpost. The first tries to compress the post. No rigid seatpost will compress and therefore no post will absorb this vector. The second vector is downward and rearward. All rigid posts will deflect (and therefore absorb) some of this force but it is a very small amount, whether it's aluminum, carbon or titanium. The design of the post is probably more important than the material in regard to the second vector. A layback post puts more leverage on the post and transmits a greater force, therefore more deflection and shock absorbtion. Again, this is a very small amount of shock absorbtion. A rigid post can't deflect too much or else it will fail prematurely. You have MUCH more to gain from a suspension post or UST wheels/tires run at lower PSI. Don't expect the material a post is made of to significantly affect your ride.
 

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You are right about the length of post.

I'd imagine the amount of post showing would make a difference because of the leverage your weight would have to flex the seatpost. I think I will give the Moots Ti post a shot.[/QUOTE]

I have a small Dean frame with alot of ti post showing and you can actually see the flex.
 

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Ken in KC said:
You haven't ridden a SS, have you? SS puts more stress on your components and frame than a geared bike does. You should probably not have mentioned that you worked in a bike shop.

Ken
Well....I am not going to be doing the same rides (going to be more XC oriented) so not nearly as much slamming/dropping/bashing. yes ss puts more stress on the drivetrain but not more on the seatpost, in fact probably less, as you are moreoften out of the saddle .....
 

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????

Guital2 said:
Well....I am not going to be doing the same rides (going to be more XC oriented) so not nearly as much slamming/dropping/bashing. yes ss puts more stress on the drivetrain but not more on the seatpost, in fact probably less, as you are moreoften out of the saddle .....
I don't understand what you're trying to say. I wouldn't suggest a CF seatpost for SSing because the additional torquing force applied to the entire bike will work the epoxy loose, quicker on SS vs. a geared bike. Sitting and spinning at a 2:1 is harder on the seat/seatpost than spinning in an easier gear.

So you're out of the saddle more, on and off the seat more and it puts less stress on it because?

Ken
 
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