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Elitest thrill junkie
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Stiffness to weight of Ti is not great and it doesn't really make for a good FS frame material (compared to say, steel). That same feature that gives it some compliance-feel for a hardtail doesn't work well on an FS, where you are trying to minimize flex so the suspension will not bind and the bike will track well, despite it's pivots. You'd be better off looking here for something unique IMO: Steel Full Suspension Bikes Aluminum can be butted and hydroformed much easier than Ti and that generally results in significantly better stiffness at the same or lighter weight, since it's so much easier to work with and you can use big CNCed chunks when necessary (linkages, pivots, etc.), wall thickness variance, etc.

Ti FS bikes will also tend to be more half-ass designed, because Ti is much harder to work with as far as tubing bends and CNCed parts. So the suspension tends to not work as well, in terms of pedaling, bump absorption, etc. The other way they get around this is they use an aluminum rear end, but they still call it a "Ti frame", even though it's just half-Ti.
 

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Elitest thrill junkie
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Although I get where you are coming from, and don't disagree either ... the latest Switch9er FS from Stanton Bikes is looking pretty handy.
That's one way to get around the inherent limitations, using a CF rear end (or aluminum), since the front triangle will often be a lot simpler. It's not half-ass designed, it's just half-Ti :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
This one from Lynsky a handful of years ago is one of the better looking designs IMO.

 

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That Stanton Switch9er bike sure gets me. I was really thinking about it quite frankly, but it's got some weird stuff going on. Very low Leverage ratio, super high progression, unproven, not cheap obviously. Just was too much of a risk.

I paid $3K for a SJ evo frame new shipped to me, a relative bargain, and it's easily the fastest bike I've ever ridden. even if it's mass produced and fragile. Sometimes common sense just has to win out.

If that Stanton received a couple of astounding reviews from trusted sources and they added the built in EightPins dropper post, I'd move forward with it.
 

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monster member
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Ti and suspension is for light riders that can get away with it. Ti is by nature a fine spring material so football player sized riders are gonna flex the hell out of em.

Frankly, custom is the place for those interested in a Ti squish.
Yet, Ti isn't as light as aluminum. Just doesn't make sense to me when you're accepting the added weight of suspension to ... have suspension. The only Ti suspension that seems possibly interesting to me is the YBB style with only about 3/4" travel but also very little added weight and also keeps a direct chain-stay for nice response to bazooka watts.

I think most people interested just want to show that they have money. But honestly, I think 75% of people seeing a ti full-suspension bike will think "what a clueless unknowing person". That sounds harsh, and I would never say it. Honestly I'm a wuss and would probably say 'nice bike'. I'd appreciate the cost you spent, and the craftmanship put into it, but honestly would also think you unknowingly bought a worse bike than an aluminum or carbon full-suspension bike because you didn't know any better. Certainly wouldn't have any jealousy... just feel bad for you about making a mistake.

Feel free to argue, because I'm not trying to be mean and I could be the one ignorant. But the things good people say to one another on the trail, and what they really think are sometimes 2 different things. I would never say something to someone's face because I want everyone to love their bike, but I'd feel like they didn't know anything about bikes and made a dumb decision to get a ti full-suspension bike. I just can't imagine Ti over hydroformed aluminum or something being a good basis for a full-suspension bike. And modern times, a 29'er already has better small bump compliance than a 26'er, and 1/2 bikes have bigger tires at lower pressure to absorb stuff, so just doesn't make sense. And I love Ti... I'm a huge fan of the SR-71 and the movie Fire Fox, and own a Titus Eleven. :) Again, I'd like a Ti YBB direct chainstay bike one day. Apologies if that's what you're speaking of.
 

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Rippin da fAt
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Yet, Ti isn't as light as aluminum. Just doesn't make sense to me when you're accepting the added weight of suspension to ... have suspension. The only Ti suspension that seems possibly interesting to me is the YBB style with only about 3/4" travel but also very little added weight and also keeps a direct chain-stay for nice response to bazooka watts.

I think most people interested just want to show that they have money. But honestly, I think 75% of people seeing a ti full-suspension bike will think "what a clueless unknowing person". That sounds harsh, and I would never say it. Honestly I'm a wuss and would probably say 'nice bike'. I'd appreciate the cost you spent, and the craftmanship put into it, but honestly would also think you unknowingly bought a worse bike than an aluminum or carbon full-suspension bike because you didn't know any better. Certainly wouldn't have any jealousy... just feel bad for you about making a mistake.

Feel free to argue, because I'm not trying to be mean and I could be the one ignorant. But the things good people say to one another on the trail, and what they really think are sometimes 2 different things. I would never say something to someone's face because I want everyone to love their bike, but I'd feel like they didn't know anything about bikes and made a dumb decision to get a ti full-suspension bike. I just can't imagine Ti over hydroformed aluminum or something being a good basis for a full-suspension bike. And modern times, a 29'er already has better small bump compliance than a 26'er, and 1/2 bikes have bigger tires at lower pressure to absorb stuff, so just doesn't make sense. And I love Ti... I'm a huge fan of the SR-71 and the movie Fire Fox, and own a Titus Eleven. :) Again, I'd like a Ti YBB direct chainstay bike one day. Apologies if that's what you're speaking of.
Never ignore the fatigue rate of metals of any type. And be sure to remember the wall thickness required for material X, since that is going to determine end results.

At this point, I could run a Ti FS since cancer is taking mass away at an alarming rate.
Fortunately, my Wildcat is on the job with full tenure status! A shitton of P'br cans were recycled and out came a Fleetwood Brougham that weighs 29 lovely pounds. That build like most of my builds, is not done with weight in mind however, duty and purpose are front burner. I treat that bike like it has an LS and enjoy the hell out of it.

Another item is my resume does have the fabrication of Ti and 4130 custom frames listed. The aerospace industry was enormously good to me.
 

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Yet, Ti isn't as light as aluminum. Just doesn't make sense to me when you're accepting the added weight of suspension to ... have suspension. The only Ti suspension that seems possibly interesting to me is the YBB style with only about 3/4" travel but also very little added weight and also keeps a direct chain-stay for nice response to bazooka watts.

I think most people interested just want to show that they have money. But honestly, I think 75% of people seeing a ti full-suspension bike will think "what a clueless unknowing person". That sounds harsh, and I would never say it. Honestly I'm a wuss and would probably say 'nice bike'. I'd appreciate the cost you spent, and the craftmanship put into it, but honestly would also think you unknowingly bought a worse bike than an aluminum or carbon full-suspension bike because you didn't know any better. Certainly wouldn't have any jealousy... just feel bad for you about making a mistake.

Feel free to argue, because I'm not trying to be mean and I could be the one ignorant. But the things good people say to one another on the trail, and what they really think are sometimes 2 different things. I would never say something to someone's face because I want everyone to love their bike, but I'd feel like they didn't know anything about bikes and made a dumb decision to get a ti full-suspension bike. I just can't imagine Ti over hydroformed aluminum or something being a good basis for a full-suspension bike. And modern times, a 29'er already has better small bump compliance than a 26'er, and 1/2 bikes have bigger tires at lower pressure to absorb stuff, so just doesn't make sense. And I love Ti... I'm a huge fan of the SR-71 and the movie Fire Fox, and own a Titus Eleven. :) Again, I'd like a Ti YBB direct chainstay bike one day. Apologies if that's what you're speaking of.
I think most Ti full sus frames are custom orders. It's a completely different market than someone buying Giantrekspeciazed. I tried ordering a Titus Moto Lite Ti but they couldn't get the tube profiles to my satisfaction and were hesitant on my numbers. I then found builders who did steel and aluminum front triangles. Id be interested in seeing what the ride would be like having seen the large difference between the other two with the same rear end with steel coming out on top.
 

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Yet, Ti isn't as light as aluminum. Just doesn't make sense to me when you're accepting the added weight of suspension to ... have suspension. The only Ti suspension that seems possibly interesting to me is the YBB style with only about 3/4" travel but also very little added weight and also keeps a direct chain-stay for nice response to bazooka watts.

I think most people interested just want to show that they have money. But honestly, I think 75% of people seeing a ti full-suspension bike will think "what a clueless unknowing person". That sounds harsh, and I would never say it. Honestly I'm a wuss and would probably say 'nice bike'. I'd appreciate the cost you spent, and the craftmanship put into it, but honestly would also think you unknowingly bought a worse bike than an aluminum or carbon full-suspension bike because you didn't know any better. Certainly wouldn't have any jealousy... just feel bad for you about making a mistake.

Feel free to argue, because I'm not trying to be mean and I could be the one ignorant. But the things good people say to one another on the trail, and what they really think are sometimes 2 different things. I would never say something to someone's face because I want everyone to love their bike, but I'd feel like they didn't know anything about bikes and made a dumb decision to get a ti full-suspension bike. I just can't imagine Ti over hydroformed aluminum or something being a good basis for a full-suspension bike. And modern times, a 29'er already has better small bump compliance than a 26'er, and 1/2 bikes have bigger tires at lower pressure to absorb stuff, so just doesn't make sense. And I love Ti... I'm a huge fan of the SR-71 and the movie Fire Fox, and own a Titus Eleven. :) Again, I'd like a Ti YBB direct chainstay bike one day. Apologies if that's what you're speaking of.
I'm not an expert in these things, and maybe all current full suspension Ti bikes work worse than their Al counterparts for various reasons. However even full suspension bikes need compliance built in to components and structures.
In fact all materials flex, and many consider the flex characteristics of Al the least desirable.
Wheels, tires, handlebars & yes frames need the correct compliance/ flex for the machine to work properly.
Generally on 2 wheeled vehicles, frames that flex more laterally are preferable for traction while leaned. This is the reason Ducati's & KTMs use steel motorcycle frames for example instead of the more common Al. Maybe bicycle frames that are pedaled need compliance somewhere else to work best, but that doesn't change the fact that some designed compliance is preferable.
Unfortunately you stating the opposite, left the rest of your argument less effective, for me.

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