Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 73 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've recently recruited a friend into serious MTB'ing. He has a new GF Paragon. Great bike, except that after two longish rides this weekend he feels a little sore...in all the wrong places. Not good.

So I've told him to pick up a Thudbuster to prevent that fresh-out-of-prison feeling. Do you guys recommend the short or long travel version for a 29er hardtail?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,039 Posts
mwcet8k said:
I've recently recruited a friend into serious MTB'ing. He has a new GF Paragon. Great bike, except that after two longish rides this weekend he feels a little sore...in all the wrong places. Not good.

So I've told him to pick up a Thudbuster to prevent that fresh-out-of-prison feeling. Do you guys recommend the short or long travel version for a 29er hardtail?
Unfortunately it will probably still hurt his butt just as much. That money is probably better spent towards good shorts and making sure he has the right size and shape saddle for this butt. If he already has those then he likely just needs more time for his posterior to adapt to sitting on a saddle and some tips from an experienced to stand up, hover over the saddle, or at least lift his weight off the saddle over bumpy stuff that will bash the saddle against his still sensitive backside. New bikers are almost guaranteed to have pain there
 

·
WNC Native
Joined
·
3,985 Posts
ST for sure

I've used both and the LT is junk compared to the ST (in my opinion). The ST take the edge off without feeling it move, the LT feels like your sitting on the end of a diving board.

I agree with boomn, make sure he has a good saddle and shorts too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
107 Posts
I had the LT just to see what the fuss was about, but one thing no one ever told me was how much heavier it is(even for someone who isn't much of a weight weenie). Like everyone said, it was like I was on the edge of a diving board. It does absorb well, but it also recoils you like Evil Knievel on a ramp.

Like mentioned, learning how to hover above the saddle, and also wearing the proper shorts, can help tremendously at a fraction of the cost. If he buys one regardless, then remind him to make sure he has the correct insert application for his weight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Once you get the right bumper setup and pre-load on the LT it shouldn't pogo or bounce excessively unless you're just too heavy for it period (I think the limit was 250#). I'm around 210# and the LT works fine on my GT Peace 9r, takes the edge off bumps pedaling uphill and it's barely perceptible. If you're sitting on it going downhill maybe you'll bounce, but then ....

The one other condition where it will bounce is if your pedaling style/cadence is not smooth, but it actually provides a feedback in some respects to untrain you from bad form.

Chose the LT after reading the reviews on MTBR
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Lt

I just installed the LT version on my hardtail..love it...works very well. As posted above, make sure you have the right bumpers in place. I do not get any bounce or dive board effect. This thing is great and really helps take the edge off the roots, ruts, and babyheads.

Weight? Only wweenies worry...probably less then a half filled water bottle. Picked mine up for $121. at Tree Fort bikes...Jenson will price match too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,558 Posts
LT,

It is one of the top reviewed products on MTBR and lots of users. For the e-riders it is a no no like handlebars above your seat, carbon fiber spacers on ti bikes, aluminum attachments on ti bikes etc.
 

·
Always Learning
Joined
·
9,608 Posts
mwcet8k said:
I've recently recruited a friend into serious MTB'ing. He has a new GF Paragon. Great bike, except that after two longish rides this weekend he feels a little sore...in all the wrong places. Not good.

So I've told him to pick up a Thudbuster to prevent that fresh-out-of-prison feeling. Do you guys recommend the short or long travel version for a 29er hardtail?
Check out the Thudbuster Blog as there is a testimonial post that talks about the differences between the two that a rider who has both models addresses quite well.

BB
 

·
ADIDAB
Joined
·
578 Posts
mwcet8k said:
I've recently recruited a friend into serious MTB'ing. He has a new GF Paragon. Great bike, except that after two longish rides this weekend he feels a little sore...in all the wrong places. Not good.

So I've told him to pick up a Thudbuster to prevent that fresh-out-of-prison feeling. Do you guys recommend the short or long travel version for a 29er hardtail?
I'd recommend a new saddle first and some more saddle time before going to a thudbuster, like others have suggested. It might be that the stock saddle on the GF is the wrong width or shape.

If after getting a new (proper fitting) saddle and getting a decent pair of knicks (yes they make a difference!), maybe look at a thuddie. That said, I've got an LT and love it. Use it on and off road on my Soma and has been great. Set up for your weight correctly it's a very useful piece of kit...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
boomn said:
Unfortunately it will probably still hurt his butt just as much. That money is probably better spent towards good shorts and making sure he has the right size and shape saddle for this butt. If he already has those then he likely just needs more time for his posterior to adapt to sitting on a saddle and some tips from an experienced to stand up, hover over the saddle, or at least lift his weight off the saddle over bumpy stuff that will bash the saddle against his still sensitive backside. New bikers are almost guaranteed to have pain there
I agree with this, the Thudbuster is a crutch for proper technique and a proper fitting saddle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,039 Posts
Amnesia said:
I agree with this, the Thudbuster is a crutch for proper technique and a proper fitting saddle.
I do like that you agree with me;) However, I wasn't trying to say that the Thudbuster couldn't have its place after the other stuff is sorted out. That didn't sound like the case in the OP's situation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
Surely there is a place for the Thudbuster, I guess I shouldn't make sweeping generalizations like that. It's definitely important to sort everything else related before resorting to one though. I guess I feel that way because I used one myself before I gained the experience that I have now. No offense intended toward the OP or his buddy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
I'm not saying thudbusters were bad, they certainly can be useful, but I think in this case there are other things I would try first, starting with technique. The OP mentions that her friend is new to riding. I have noticed that many beginners stay seated far too much, perhaps for the sense of security or to reduce fatigue. I do not know if this is the case for the person in mention, but it is worth considering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,558 Posts
Amnesia said:
Surely there is a place for the Thudbuster, I guess I shouldn't make sweeping generalizations like that. It's definitely important to sort everything else related before resorting to one though. I guess I feel that way because I used one myself before I gained the experience that I have now. No offense intended toward the OP or his buddy.
Well with your earlier train of thought, then full suspension, disc brakes or even bikes in general are crutches too? And only real men go barefoot through the desert too?;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
227 Posts
richwolf said:
Well with your earlier train of thought, then full suspension, disc brakes or even bikes in general are crutches too? And only real men go barefoot through the desert too?;)
Damn right! I ride a coaster brake, rigid, 26" bike with flat non-sweep handlebars! And a really long stem!:thumbsup:
 
1 - 20 of 73 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top