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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi Guys,

I'm strongly considering selling my 2001 RM6 Frame to get an '06 Slayer. I was hoping to not only save some weight with the newer frame, but also gain a more sophisticated rear end that bobs less on climbs.

To be honest, I find the RM6 pedals quite well uphill. This has improved even more with the new RP23 i'm using for the rear. In propedal 2 mode it seems to work quite good on climbs.

From what i see, the LCCR looks to be a variant of the Thrust-link design. Does this mean the new Slayer would ride similarly to a Thrust-link frame? Between the two, would it be worth the upgrade, or would what i'd gain in terms of rear suspension performance be a minor improvement?

Unfortunately my LBS doesn't allow Demos on actual trails, so i'm unable to really hammer one to compare the difference. Has anyone been able to experience both to provide a comparison?

Thanks!
 

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Whether or not to upgrade to an 06 Slayer is a tough question because those RM6's where awesome bikes. In terms of suspension feel on descents and drops a thrustlink design is pretty much unbeatable...personally, I find it kind of sad that today's freeride bikes are being designed with pedalling as the #1 focus (ie VPP) over how well it feels on drops. I'd rather have a design like the RM6 with a propedal shock that you can adjust rather than have the suspension design inherently be more efficient because that also doens't feel as good.

Anyways, that was pretty much just a side rant. My opinion is not to upgrade if your RM6 is working well but rather just keep updating the components and then maybe in a couple more years spring for a new bike. The new Slayers do pedal amazing with or without propedal but my Switch is almost as good with the propedal turned on but when I turn the propedal off it feels better than a Slayer on the descents.

I imagine the Slayer doens't feel that different than your RM6...the Slayer is certainly gonna be a lot closer than any VPP or DWlink bike. The new Slayers don't give up to much descending ability to gain the pedalling which is good but if you are happy with your RM6 on hills then I'd stick with it because you're gonna prefer on the DH...just treat yourself to some X.O. components and a new fork or something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Thanks for your insight Dan, those are some great points. I'm still trying to shave the weight of my RM6, and the JR-T will probably be the next area to change. Maybe i'll get a Fox 36 RC as it will probably be 2lbs lighter. That should drop the bikes weight to 32lbs so far.

With the addition of the RP23, the RM6 does climb much better. So maybe i'll just hold off on a new frame and like you said milk the RM6 for what it's worth until I really need a new bike.

Interesting note regarding thrust-link designs. I hardly see as many out there than say multi-pivot vpp-ish horst FSR styles. But it's nice to see Rocky still makes them as I do like the way it feels on big hits. And it appears of the newer bikes out there, Chumba and Commencal seem to like the desgn as well. Interstingly though, whenever I ride my RM6, people on the trail as well as some bike shops seem to not understand it and dismiss it as a "lesser" suspension design. Personally I don't care, but I guess it is an example of marketing on the VPP-front making it's way to the masses as the "best" design.
 

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VPP is a good design for XC or AM bikes but it's way over hyped and that has led to it spilling into the FR/DH bikes. If you go look at the reviews on this site for the VP-Free everyone is saying 'Best FR bike ever! It pedals so good!'.

I just sit there bewildered and wonder who decided the best FR bike should be the one that pedals the best. How about other considerations like strength, drop ability, handling etc.?

I realize that most people can't afford to have a pure FR bike but using a shock with propedal that you can switch on and off seems like a way better idea than permanently compromising your bikes ability with a VPP design. You may not see that many thrustlink style bikes anymore but if you do still see single pivots and faux 4-bar bikes in DH (ie. Orange, Sinister, Norco etc). The best way to tell which suspension design is the best if you don't want to consider pedalling efficiency is to look at motocross bikes. Motocross riders expect similar things from their bikes as FR/DH riders do yet that sport is almost entirely single pivot, thrustlink style designs and the reason is simple...they work the best in the widest variator of technical conditions. Other designs may work better in one certain aspect of riding but overall a single pivot kills it.

A Fox 36 or a Marz. 66SL (very light and very adjustable) would be awesome forks for your RM6. If you bought one of these and then converted your bike to tubeless (do ghetto tubeless with Stans sealant but make your own rim strips from BMX tubes, $25 total) and you'll save another 1-2 lbs plus have more traction and no flats. It'll feel like a whole new bike. Maybe treat yourself to new grips and a full SRAM X9 shifter/derailleur combo (just $140 at Pricepoint.com).
 
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