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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I just took a look at the beautiful Niner carbon forks on ebay. Can be had for around 300. It's just a good enough price for me to consider giving rigid riding a try. But before I do, I wanted to see who here is running a full rigid setup, what your experience has been, what are the limitations, etc? I ride XC almost exclusively, but in the rocky, rooty southeast :madman:
 

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They are the best rigid fork going and I would highly recommend one!

I would however, also highly recommend going to your LBS for one as being a carbon component, warranty is always good!

(I have had 2 and never had a warranty issue)
 

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I don't use a carbon fork but I am rigid with a KM fork and enjoy it for the following reasons (and weight isn't one of them)
-Requires more skill and precision, this has made local trails new for me as I never gave them as much thought as before (sometimes I've been known to ditch the gears which is even more fun on some trails).
-It's nostalgic, my first mountain bike was full rigid...I had forgot how fun riding is without all the extra moving parts.
-Less maintenance, 'nuff said
-Friends think you're super human for riding the same trails as they do on their full suspension bikes.
-Chicks dig rigid over squishy (well most chicks at least)
-You get killer forearm workouts and soon you'll look like Popeye

Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
They are the best rigid fork going and I would highly recommend one!

I would however, also highly recommend going to your LBS for one as being a carbon component, warranty is always good!

(I have had 2 and never had a warranty issue)
Good point, although at almost half the msrp, it could pay to gamble in the instance
 

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I don't use a carbon fork but I am rigid with a KM fork and enjoy it for the following reasons (and weight isn't one of them)
-Requires more skill and precision, this has made local trails new for me as I never gave them as much thought as before (sometimes I've been known to ditch the gears which is even more fun on some trails).
-It's nostalgic, my first mountain bike was full rigid...I had forgot how fun riding is without all the extra moving parts.
-Less maintenance, 'nuff said
-Friends think you're super human for riding the same trails as they do on their full suspension bikes.
-Chicks dig rigid over squishy (well most chicks at least)
-You get killer forearm workouts and soon you'll look like Popeye

Enjoy!
also, riding rigid will make you a better rider, because you will learn to pick the best line through roots, rocks, and bad trail. After a summer of riding full rigid (SIR9, steel fork) I could not believe how much more efficiently I rode my full squish bike.
 

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I ride a full rigid steel frame carbon fork SS bike. Best bike I've had. I just feel more connected to the trail and the ride is honestly as good or better than my old bike which was alum. with air up front. Like the others stated, you pick better lines and can't just smash through stuff as much, but for me it's a much better ride. I'd recommend trying it.
 

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How big of a tire can the Niner fork clear? Part of going rigid happily is being able to fit some big rubber (and get your mind out of the gutter). I could fit a Knard on my Salsa steel fork:

 

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If you do go with the rigid fork plan on it taking a bit of time to get used to. Took me about 3-4 weeks until I stopped being constantly reminded I did not have suspension. You'll find you become so much more active "micro-lifting" (best word I could come up with) the front over smaller obstacles you used to let the suspension handle, and your timing on bigger features will improve, after you bounce off them the first couple weeks!
 

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Yes. It F-ing hurts. But it is strangely do-able with a fat-bike in soft snow.
 

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I just acquired recently a steel ss rigid and in my opinion it rides really good. It's my favorite bike now coming off an xc trek hardtail with suspension fork. I say try it, at least worst case scenario it would improve your riding skills if or when you did switch back to suspension fork.
 

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Prepare for your front wheel to need truing after every ride especially if you want to ride fast through rough stuff.
 

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My SS rigid steel frame, steel fork bike became my go to soon after building it up. It may take some getting used to and you may need to modify how you ride through certain sections of trail, but overall it should be an enjoyable experience. FWIW, I have ridden many miles going as hard and as fast as the squishy bike in front of me and have not had an issue with my wheels (WTB i23 and Hopes).
Give it a shot, it should be fun.
 

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Prepare for your front wheel to need truing after every ride especially if you want to ride fast through rough stuff.
The appropriate wheel for the rider weight and terrain should fix that so long as the build is quality. I've pinged my front rim countless times and still hasn't needed truing over 6 months. Light rim and spokes too.

I run ti fork and frame SS....it is much faster than my heavier geared hardtail. There are times though when I am glad to have a sus fork, only you can sort that out for yourself. 90% of the time the rigid SS is the bike of choice here, for me at least. The steering precision, 2.4 tyre, short stays and less weight more than makes up for front squish unless there is a lot of rock on fast trails.
 

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Count me as another to say GO FOR IT!

Both my mtb's are rigid and I ride fairly technical terrain.

It is ideal for ss climbing...

SPP
 

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I just installed a Niner rigid carbon fork on my Stumpy EVO ht and love it! ($400 at Jenson) The weight savings alone is worth it, gave the bike new life compared to the Reba that came off.

Climbing is noticeably improved. Descending speed is only slightly slower.

I'm running a 2.3 Specialized Purgatory right now but a 2.4 Conti Mountain King will fit.

Tire pressure / running tubless is very important IMO......I ride in varied terrain including rocky trails, if the tire pressure is low it's not a real big deal. I can go as low as 20 psi at 215 lb riding weight.

Full rigid is lot of fun and it will make you a better rider for sure...Go for it!
 

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But before I do, I wanted to see who here is running a full rigid setup, what your experience has been, what are the limitations, etc? I ride XC almost exclusively, but in the rocky, rooty southeast [/FONT]:madman:
I ride rocky rooty trails. My normal ride is a long travel FS bike, but I have 2 rigid bikes which are mainly used for bikepacking and travel [fatbike].

I do ride them on our local trails occasionally and I never come back wanting to get rid of the FS bike.

It's fun for a change, but I can ride my FS bike 7 days a week for a month and feel great. 2-3 days on the rigid and I am beat up all over.

I started riding MTBs when rigid was the only option so I have the ability to get down the trail without suspension it's just not as much fun for me where I live.

I also find that with quality suspension the effort $$ I spend on servicing it isn't awful even in the PNWet.

I do enjoy my rigid bikes in other places that aren't so rough, but that's not my normal reality.
 

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Thanks for the responses everyone! i think my question has been answered
I think it has, but to chuck my 2p in the mix, I recently went from a HT26er (with admittedly poor fork) to a steel rigid 29er and it is absolutely the most fun I have had riding in years.

For some perspective a full sus would be overkill round here, imo, which is mainly open or wooded single tracks, no rocks or mountains.
 

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...I ride XC almost exclusively, but in the rocky, rooty southeast :madman:
Whereabouts? I learned MTBing in N. GA on a rigid. The biggest mistakes I ever made were getting going really fast then blundering into a washed out area full of babyheads.

The appropriate wheel for the rider weight and terrain should fix that so long as the build is quality. I've pinged my front rim countless times and still hasn't needed truing over 6 months. Light rim and spokes too.
...
I have hit stuff hard enough to flat the front tire and my rim is OK. It usually happens when you are going fast and more or less skipping across the tops of all the bumps - then there's one square-edged thing sticking up just a little higher than everything else and WHAM! Just stay loose.

-F
 
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