Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
search Thomson on the boards

you will find out that the thomson stem is the best...made from a chunk of Al, no welds or bolts protruding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
ohvina said:
The easton's is 40% less in price.
What will u choose?
For XC riding, the choice of a stem does not typically involve strength. It's usually just looks and weight.

The Thomson is a beautiful stem with great machining. Will it perform better than the Easton? Nope. The Thomson stem is highly regarded mostly due to the "bling" factor :rolleyes:

In fact, when it comes to clamp strength....Chris King headsets do NOT recommend using stems with the Thomson-style clamp. They recommend the standard 2-bolt wrap around clamp..found on most stems.

If money were not an issue, I'd go for a Hope stem. I've had issues with Thomson stems (most people don't, btw). If money were an issue, I'd buy a Bontrager stem, or a Raceface (I use Thomson, Raceface and Bontrager stems on my bikes).
 

·
Foreign Entity
Joined
·
275 Posts
toyota kawasaki said:
but its a stem.. how many people have broken a stem?
Funnily enough, I have bent one, destroyed the fork at the same time, but the stem definitely bent.

And as for the modern stems, the general rule of thumb is the more you pay, the less it will weigh. ;)

Blueshorts is right though, the Raceface and Bontrager stems are a nice option too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,149 Posts
ohvina said:
The easton's is 40% less in price.
What will u choose?
First off most any stem will get the job done, the exception are the stupid light roadie weight stems that even the roadies break but they are made purely for racing or weight weinies and not meant to last more than one season.

In theory a $15 one-piece, mass produced, cold forged stem will be stronger than a cnc'd stem. So strength shouldn't be an issue here. Where I find find the difference between the "cheap" stems and the pricier stems is in the flex I feel at the bars. The flex is from the way the bar clamps to the stem. 2-bolt bar clamp stems can not hold the bar near as well as a 4-bolt. This probably isn't true across the board but generally holds true when comparing stems.

Thomson stems and seatpost, like King headsets and hubs have a lot of bling factor. Are they worth it? That's mostly up to you.

If i had the money to spend definitely a Thomson or Raceface Deus
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,140 Posts
go for easton stem.

If you need to save money, you should buy the Easton stem. Both brand names produce high qualilty stem. The decision of purchase rest upon the user personal preference rather than strength or durability.
 

·
Fermented Grain Sampler
clinking clanking clattering collection of collagenous junk
Joined
·
4,166 Posts
I went with Thompson because of quality and the lack of protruding bolts. I've smacked my knee a few times on other stems' bolts and the small price diff to go up to a Thompson was worth it to me. Its a set it and forget it component. Not something you ever want to worry about. Bikeman has them for about $65.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
To me, factors including strength, durability, weight and cost are more significant than just the "look".

Comparing the easton and thomson stem,

Easton: lighter, cheaper, traditional clamp on steer tube, but 2-bolt clamp on handlebar
Thomson: look, beautiful machining, 4-bolt clamp on handlebar but innovative clamp on steer tube

Is there any singificant difference in respect of strength and durablity?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
ohvina said:
To me, factors including strength, durability, weight and cost are more significant than just the "look".

Comparing the easton and thomson stem,

Easton: lighter, cheaper, traditional clamp on steer tube, but 2-bolt clamp on handlebar
Thomson: look, beautiful machining, 4-bolt clamp on handlebar but innovative clamp on steer tube

Is there any singificant difference in respect of strength and durablity?
I'm not sure which Easton Stem you are referring to. I know it's the EA 50....but which year? Is it on closeout?

With everything else beig equal (which they rarely are), a heavier stem will most likely have more strength. I've never seen them compared...so we really don't know. Having said that.....the Easton stem will be plenty strong. 2-bolt vs 4-bolt is just preference. I ride with both and don't care which I use. In fact, 2-bolt hb clamps are recommended for carbon bars.

2 of my favorites are RF Deus (4-bolt hb clamp) and Bontrager (2-bolt). The EA 50 (current model..forged) looks like a fine stem.
 

·
In my mind, I can do it!
Joined
·
2,365 Posts
ohvina said:
The easton's is 40% less in price.
What will u choose?
What size are you trying to get? I have a new Race Face Prodigy 120mm that I would be willing to sell for real cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Torque....

not enough average joe's have torque wrenches.

Blue Shorts
2-bolt vs 4-bolt is just preference. I ride with both and don't care which I use. In fact, 2-bolt hb clamps are recommended for carbon bars.
On a 2 bolt handlebar binder the bolts are torqued 175-250 inch/pounds a four-bolt thomson only 48 i/p

Blue Shorts
In fact, when it comes to clamp strength....Chris King headsets do NOT recommend using stems with the Thomson-style clamp. They recommend the standard 2-bolt wrap around clamp..found on most stems.
On a pinch type 2 bolt steerer tube binder the torque is 100-150 i/p a thomson is 48 i/p. Without a torque wrench overtightening is easy leading to carbon and al handlebar and steerer tube failure.

I have seen plenty of pictures of broken stems and to me it looks like it could only take one to ruin your day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24,083 Posts
wg said:
I went with Thompson because of quality and the lack of protruding bolts. I've smacked my knee a few times on other stems' bolts and the small price diff to go up to a Thompson was worth it to me. Its a set it and forget it component. Not something you ever want to worry about. Bikeman has them for about $65.
WG has hit the "stem" on the head as it were. This is the reason I would spend the extra cash for the Thomson stem, I too have hit my knee on the bolts of normal stems and it hurts like hell and makes the price diff well worth it to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
LyNx said:
WG has hit the "stem" on the head as it were. This is the reason I would spend the extra cash for the Thomson stem, I too have hit my knee on the bolts of normal stems and it hurts like hell and makes the price diff well worth it to me.
Others, including Bontrager make stems with recessed bolts.
 

·
contains quinine
Joined
·
4,639 Posts
Some time ago, in some forum (ooohhh, sooo specific), someone posted pictures from the Thompson factory. iirc, they posted a picture of a broken Easton stem, broken on testing equipment there... That said, I ride my Easton stem and don't worry about it. I can't imagine putting it through that much stress.

(am I being dumb?)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
vermont said:
On a 2 bolt handlebar binder the bolts are torqued 175-250 inch/pounds a four-bolt thomson only 48 i/p.
The specs vary by manufacturer. Race face recommends 65 in-lbs per bolt (2-bolt steerer clamp) Where the heck did you find that 175 - 250 number? It's bogus.

vermont said:
On a pinch type 2 bolt steerer tube binder the torque is 100-150 i/p a thomson is 48 i/p. Without a torque wrench overtightening is easy leading to carbon and al handlebar and steerer tube failure.

I have seen plenty of pictures of broken stems and to me it looks like it could only take one to ruin your day.
It's far easier to over-torque a Thomson handlebar clamp thahn it is to over torque a 2-bolt handlebar clamp. WIth 4 bolts, half the torque/ bolt will apply the same force as a 2-bolt clamp with twice the torque.

The Thomson steerer clamp has a smaller contact area than a pinch type clamp. It takes less force to damage the steerer.

You appear to have it all backwards. I's easier to damage a steerer with the Thomson clamp...and easier to damage bars with a 4-bolt handlebar clamp as compared to a 2-bolt clamp.

Do you make this stuff up?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
yes

Blue Shorts said:
The specs vary by manufacturer. Race face recommends 65 in-lbs per bolt (2-bolt steerer clamp) Where the heck did you find that 175 - 250 number? It's bogus.
from the park.com torque guide
http://www.parktool.com/repair_help/torque.shtml

Blue Shorts said:
It's far easier to over-torque a Thomson handlebar clamp thahn it is to over torque a 2-bolt handlebar clamp. WIth 4 bolts, half the torque/ bolt will apply the same force as a 2-bolt clamp with twice the torque.

The Thomson steerer clamp has a smaller contact area than a pinch type clamp. It takes less force to damage the steerer.

You appear to have it all backwards. I's easier to damage a steerer with the Thomson clamp...and easier to damage bars with a 4-bolt handlebar clamp as compared to a 2-bolt clamp.

Do you make this stuff up?
i am agreeing with you that it is easier to overtorque a 4-bolt and a thomson style steerer clamp.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top