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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I have a 2000 Giant Rincon SE, and am thinking of upgrading the components. Its a 14.5 in frame and fits me great, Im only 5'5. I got it really cheap and am loving it so far. Im thinking of upgrading the components. Nothing too fancy but enough for me to tell the difference. I know Im gonna get alot of comments that the bike is not worth it and I should just save up and buy a newer bike. I love the frame on this thing and it fits me just perfect. So to me it is worth some components. Suggestions anyone? Just trying to pick the brains of people who know way more than I do. Thanks guys.
 

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Haro Sonix LT VL120
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813 Posts
I know how you feel about upgrading the components, I have done the same thing. It might not be overall cheaper but I love getting new parts for my bike. Anyway, from the pic online, it looks like the headset is threaded so a new headset and fork would be in order. Make sure the headtube diameter of the frame is 1-1/8 before ordering any parts You already have v-brakes so unless you want better ones, I would put them at the lower end of your list. A nine speed drivetrain would benefit you too. If you go with Shimano Deore the prices will be reasonable. Personally the most beneficial part you could put on there would be a good fork. A Rock Shox Recon or Tora would be soooo much better than what is on there now. Hope this helps.
 

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beautiful jackass
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At least make the effort to tell us what's currently on the bike. Here are the original specs on your bike.

You may want to tell us which of these parts you feel are lacking, and specifically why you feel this way.

Also, unless you're willing to spend more than that bike is worth, you will not notice any differences once you "upgrade". The most noticeable things you can improve upon are often the most expensive: wheels, fork, and drive-train.

The money you spend on any noticeable "upgrades" will likely put you close to the cost of an entirely new 2011 complete entry level bike, with a whole component list of "upgrades". I know you said you like that frame, but that doesn't mean you won't like the current model Boulder, which is a similar level of bike you currently have, but everything will feel nicer because it is not eleven years old.

P.S. Notice how every time I said the word "upgrade" I put it in quotes? That's because many uneducated bikers think there is a laundry list of nice stuff (i.e. upgrades) they need to spend money on to make their entry level bikes more capable. An entry level bike is equipped for entry level terrain. Your goal should be to ride your bike until you advance beyond its factory built limitations. And then you'll have a much better idea of what kind of riding you like to do, and what kind of higher quality bike might help you feel like you're getting more out of your riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
D-Avid thanks for the tip, Will definitely look into a headtube and new drivetrain. Maybe a new fork if I come across one. Just the kind of input I was looking for.

One incredible donkey, you sure live up to your handle. Just cause Im new to riding does not mean I cant tell the sarcasm in your worthless post. Like I said in my initial post I wasnt looking for your opinion on whether or not to buy a new bike. And you can keep your “quote” meanings to yourself. And lastly I didnt ask what my goals should be on my bike. Your arrogance is funny.
 

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Yes, that's fonetic
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D-Avid thanks for the tip, Will definitely look into a headtube and new drivetrain. Maybe a new fork if I come across one. Just the kind of input I was looking for.

One incredible donkey, you sure live up to your handle. Just cause Im new to riding does not mean I cant tell the sarcasm in your worthless post. Like I said in my initial post I wasnt looking for your opinion on whether or not to buy a new bike. And you can keep your “quote” meanings to yourself. And lastly I didnt ask what my goals should be on my bike. Your arrogance is funny.
Take the advice given you (and no, you can't get a new headtube). I didn't see any sarcasm in his post, quite the contrary. He took a lot of time explaining exactly why what you propose to do is a bad idea and is trying to save you from yourself. Take it or leave it, but don't go on the offensive if you don't care for the responses on a public forum.

The cheapest way to get what you want is very possibly to buy the current version of your bike with the components you like. Swap the components to your beloved old frame and you have a back up if (when) it breaks.
 

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Haro Sonix LT VL120
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813 Posts
O.I.D. was correct in stating that the cost of a new drivetrain, fork and headset will end up being the same as a new low end mtb. If you want to upgrade you current bike than go for it. O.I.D was just pointing out that it is not the most efficient way to spend your money. The best thing to do is save up and buy a 600-900 dollar hardtail. They come with pretty sweet components for the price and will last a while. The bottom line is that no one can beat the price that bike manufacturers pay for components because they buy so many of them. So if you were to build the exact same bike up that you could buy at a bike shop or online, you pay more for the individual components than buying the whole bike. That is the reason it is suggested strongly to just buy a new bike. What you do is up to you. In your original post you clearly stated that you didn't want to buy a new bike and just wanted to upgrade your current bike. When I first started mtbing, I rode a Trek 930 fully rigid bike. Because I didn't have alot of money, I would replace worn out parts as needed. The first part I replaced was the fork. Next to clipless pedals, the fork is the best upgrade you can make. Especially on a rigid hardtail. By the time I stopped riding that bike, it was a pretty sweet ride. Anywho, I know where you are coming from and either way you go it is just about having fun.

BTW- a headtube is the part of the frame where the fork steerer tube goes through and connects to your handlebar. You would only need to replace your HEADSET (the black cups pressed into the headtube that encase the bearings) if you got a new fork. The headtube cannot be replaced.
 

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Live 2 Ride
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A nine speed drivetrain would benefit you too. If you go with Shimano Deore the prices will be reasonable.
Shimano now offers 9 speed in the Alivio flavor.
 
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