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Team Velveeta™
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's a question for the exercise physiology and sports medecine experts:

I live at 7,000 ft and have the luxury of training between here and 12,000 feet (or higher). I can ride from my house to 12K in 3-4 hours. I've lived at this elevation for a decade. I'm not a great rider, not terribly fast, but I have pretty darned good endurance. I did Leadville in 11:15 last year, and had been hoping to improve on that by half an hour or so this year mostly by getting my weight down a little more than last year. So far, so good.

But here's the thing: My family scheduled an Alaska cruise to celebrate my mom's 70th and my sister's 40th birthdays for the first week of August. I fly to Juneau July 31 and return to Colorado August 6th. So I'll be sitting around at sea level with no real opportunity to train for a whole week, with exactly 1 week to re-adjust to elevation before this year's LT100 after I return. Not going on the trip would mean being disowned. No avoiding it.

So, am I totally screwed? How much of my tolerance for thin air will I lose in 1 week? What's the best thing for me to do to prepare, other than being utterly trained and ready by July 30? When I get back to CO, should I immediately go up to treeline and live in a campsite up there for a week?
 

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the thick air may actually help. kinda of like resting before the big day.

Anyway that is what high altitude climbers do. go high then quick down low to recover.
 

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Grizzly
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This is not really related to your question....but I did an Alaskan cruise a couple of summers ago, it was a lot of fun. Great scenery, very relaxing, and as usual with cruises...lots of good food. Careful not to go overboard at the midnight chocolate buffet :D
 

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Team Velveeta™
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
fewd

alizbee said:
... and as usual with cruises...lots of good food. Careful not to go overboard at the midnight chocolate buffet :D
Yeah, for sure part of my strategy for dealing with this week will be to be careful about eating. I'm thinking it would be best to neither gain nor lose weight that week. And to focus on the stuff that's actually good for me. Little or no refined sugar, good balance of fruits and veggies, and plenty of fresh seafood, but not so much that I bloat. Probably more fish and not so much crab and shellfish.

But I'm a dessert freak, so it's going to be a challenge to turn my back on that.
 

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TomP said:
So, am I totally screwed? How much of my tolerance for thin air will I lose in 1 week? What's the best thing for me to do to prepare, other than being utterly trained and ready by July 30? When I get back to CO, should I immediately go up to treeline and live in a campsite up there for a week?
I think that the prevailling wisom on this is that the positive effects of altitude living/training last for roughly three weeks.There is still quite a bit of controversy in that field and the effects are not fully understood but I don't think that anyone is going to say that one week is going to hurt you at all.

Of course, everybody's different, so YMMV....
 

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Really I am that slow
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Air up there or down there

I wouldn't worry about it.... I think you psyhc yourself out more by worrying about it instead of enjoying it...

Just my .02
 

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Master Gardener
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I agree. I live at 6000' and when I return from a week at sea level in Mexico or California or Jersey, I don't notice any difference in keeping up on group rides. If anything, I'm more rested.
 

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I agree with the consensus

The positive physiological adapations that take place as a result of exposure to altitude will not be lost in just a week. Live high train low is the addage.

have a good trip.

" I don't know but I've been told..... eskimo pu$$y is very cold" Full metal jacket
 

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Team Velveeta™
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Wise observation.

SlowerThenSnot said:
I wouldn't worry about it.... I think you psyhc yourself out more by worrying about it instead of enjoying it...
Good advice. Positive attitude will overcome altitude. I'm not going to worry about it.

Thanks all for the input.
 

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Exactly 1/2 of 2-Epic
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TomP said:
Good advice. Positive attitude will overcome altitude. I'm not going to worry about it.

Thanks all for the input.
The week away from the bike will have a bigger impact that being at sea level for a week. I too live at altitude and frequently head to the east coast on business, so deal with a similar situation all the time. Just be sure to open up properly the week before the race - you don't want to go too easy that week or you will be very flat.

It's totally doable - I've had one of my best performances 7 days after being off the bike and at sea level for 5 days.
 

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Spent a week in NY in January. I managed to put in one run, which I no longer enjoy, but felt the need for some cardio. I ran until my feet started to develop a blister, and felt very little labor in my effort nor breathing. Two days later my leg muscles were quite sore. Much more so than I would have expected, and remained so for about 2 more days. Joel Friel's book mentions training low, and resting high. I believe this has to do with being able to tax the muscle group more at lower elevation vs. taxing the respatory at higher elevation. I don't know if it would be beneficial for you to sneak in some training while you are there, but I thought I would mention it. I cannot tell you just how I felt upon returning, as I developed some type of flu on the return trip. I week after getting back to altitude, I felt a bit weak on the bike, but I think that had more to do with the flu than altitude. I would hit it hard immediately upon return, then taper toward the race. Enjoy the salmon, and use lots of deet.
 
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