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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


Do these 9 speed guides strike anyone else as being... somewhat dumb?

e.thirteen and MRP seem to has both hit the market at the exact same time with these, so i gotta assume there's demand and more similar devices on the market. My experience has been that a FD or FD style device only works if the chain has a small ring to fall on to, and a jumpstop/bash works fine so long as you're not bashing through rock gardens fast enough or do weird ratcheting moves. Otherwise, you need an idler.

Seems like a device that would only be the best option for a slow-descending bashie-eschewing weight-weenie 9-speeder.

Tell me that i'm wrong. :thumbsup:
 

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I have not used one, or set one up, but from my understanding, it's not really like a front derailleur, that has a wide cage to accommodate shifting.

The cage on the guides are only slightly wider than the chain, so if set up properly, low enough on the chainring, it's impossible for the chain to come off (the top run at least.)
 

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SOLOMON's said:
Yea, but correct me if I'm wrong, the chain tension will be tighter too.

I guess all these compensate for one another.
I wouldn't think so, those guides aren't touching the chain at all so they won't add tension to the chain.
 

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SOLOMON's said:
Yea, but correct me if I'm wrong, the chain tension will be tighter too.
:confused:

These guides cannot effect chain tension. If set-up correctly it will not even touch the chain under normal riding, only if the chain is coming off, and in that case the guide is narrow enough that the chain cannot fall off of the chainring to the inside or outside.

It's kinda like a front derailleur, it only touches the chain during a shift.
 

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ups and downs
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They worked well for the World Cup racers running 1x9 in 2009, like Geoff Kabush and Julien Absalon. They do prevent chains getting flipped off on rough stuff or in the extreme 36:32 sort of ratios. There is just a bit of chain rub at the back edge in the big cog unless you've got a crankset with some chainline adjustment, if it became really annoying you could always relieve it with a Dremel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
AL29er said:
More often than not I lose my chain from the bottom in rocky terrain, so I really fail to see the point in this type of guide ;)
yeah, exactly, me too. With a front derailleur i'd lose the chain off the bottom too, but the chain would land on the small gear, where it could ride back up. No luck with one of these though.
 

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LA CHÈVRE
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MRP's guide has been available for a year at least now. If the chain comes off the bottom, pedal and it will get back on as the guide prevents the top to come off the ring, that has pretty much always worked for me with a derailleur unless it's a nasty chainsuck but with only one chainring and a shorter chain, chainsucks are all but eliminated. With a jumpstop and bashring, the chain can still fall off from the bottom inside. As mentioned, the guide doesn't really touches the chain unless it wants to come off the ring.

SOLOMON's, yes, the 1.X should fit your bike.
 

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THANKS!

Just to share, and I really need advice:

I'm using Stocked GXP2 Crank 32T, 11T-32T Cogs, SRAM X.0 GRIP SHIFT.

(I understand 32T is rather small, but I'll bust the rather new chainring before going 38T/40T.)

And the root of the problem : I'm getting X.0 shortcage RD, suitable? or Overkill?


I does moderate XC race and almost daily trail riding.


Sorry to sound desperate, I HAVE NOT RIDE FOR MORE THAN A WEEK AND I"M HAVING WITHDRAWAL SYMPTOMS!
 

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LA CHÈVRE
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If you only have been riding for a week, maybe keeping the chainrings and front shifting for a longer time might be a good idea, ride in more places, see if you get stronger and then see what kind of gear range is good for you. No? Switching to 1x9, upgrading to X.0, seems a bit too much too early.

I'll be riding a 1x10 setup this year, 11-36 XX cassette with a 32T ring. The 32 sounds and looks small but in real mountain bike conditions, where I ride, with my legs, I'll be able to climb anything and the big gears I'll miss were pretty much never used...
 

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Dan Gerous said:
If you only have been riding for a week, maybe keeping the chainrings and front shifting for a longer time might be a good idea, ride in more places.
Yea I did that, haha, I did it to prevent hole in my pocket.

Dan Gerous said:
see if you get stronger and then see what kind of gear range is good for you.
Not to be crazy, I tried trail with 44t as well, bit tad slower but still manageable. Thus I'll stick with my stocked 32t.

Dan Gerous said:
where I ride, with my legs, I'll be able to climb anything and the big gears I'll miss were pretty much never used...
Pretty much similar with my side, but what I encountered is that when I have long straight course, about 300meters - 400 meters stretch, I cannot really sprint my best, I feel limited.

Guess I'll have to see the race results with my new setup, contrast it, bust the stock gear and get a 38t/40t.

Thanks for GREAT ADVICE Dan Gerous!!!:D
 
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