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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My bike came with a DHF exo Maxterra 2.3 on the front and a 2.3 Ardent Race on the rear. It was an extremely fast rolling combo but the rear broke loose alot and sucked climbing on roots. I honestly didn't even realize how well that combo rolled until I switched it up and purchased new tires because I was looking for more grip. I went with a 2.5 exo DHF Maxterra up front and a 2.3 exo Aggressor on the rear. Both tubeless setups. The new tires definitely gave me the grip I was seeking and they are fast going down. On the flats and the climbs though I feel like I am pulling a boat anchor around. Curious which of these 2 tires, or maybe it's both, that are giving me the terrible rolling resistance. I'll run this current combo thru the winter. Maybe in the spring I'll switch things up. I plan on sticking with Maxxis tires but curious what anyone else might change about this setup or maybe a different setup that would hook up decent but maybe roll a little better.
 

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The Aggressor unfortunately “is” the Maxxis rear tire designed for decent pedaling, and cornering grip. You see it a lot on the back of “aggressive” bikes that are mostly ridden in dry conditions.

The Dissector is newer, but actually fills a similar use case as a “grips, and doesn’t suck to pedal” sort of tire.

But I’d guess that if the aggressor feels like a boat anchor to you, then the Recon is probably the right move. I don’t know if the dissector would be enough different to justify its purchase.
 

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always licking the glass
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The Aggressor unfortunately “is” the Maxxis rear tire designed for decent pedaling, and cornering grip. You see it a lot on the back of “aggressive” bikes that are mostly ridden in dry conditions.

The Dissector is newer, but actually fills a similar use case as a “grips, and doesn’t suck to pedal” sort of tire.

But I’d guess that if the aggressor feels like a boat anchor to you, then the Recon is probably the right move. I don’t know if the dissector would be enough different to justify its purchase.
I prefer the Dissector over the Aggressor any day. A really common combo you see here in Colorado is the Assagai or DHF front, and Dissector in the back. I’m running Assagai front and Dissector rear in the dry season, then i move to a Magic Mary and Nobby Nic for the wetter rides.

The Aggressor is a weird tire. Works only in very dry condition, and it seems to be happy only within a specific PSI range that I can only find on occasion. Ive had that tire wash out on me unexpectedly a few times, and it also felt like a boat anchor to me too.

A DHF front, forekaster rear is a great all season ride as long as it’s not too dry. OP: If you want something pretty fast rolling for the rear, the Ikon or Rekon is a great choice. I run Rekons front and rear on my plus bike.
 

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The sweet spot on tire traction vs. low rolling resistance (plus puncture protection) varies greatly depending on the bike, the rider, trail conditions and so on.

My personality is that I enjoy optimizing things and tires really are one of the most obvious ways to change your bike. As such, I have a garage full of tires.

Ultimately you have to read ride reports from a few riders that you trust (I trust a handful of posters on this site more than the professionals when it comes to tire reviews), combine that with what you have found works for you most of the time, and then just buy and test a lot of tires.

A few general notes however:

1) About 65% of rolling resistance comes from the rear tire, because about 65% of your weight is on the rear tire. So most of the rolling resistance improvements come from the rear, which is convenient since most of us need less traction in the rear. The front tire still matters however.
2) I like slightly wider, softer and more aggressive front tire patterns, combined with closer spaced more narrow rear tire patterns. Actually the set up you have currently is one of the best in this category.
3) Short chainstays have more rear traction and often need less aggressive tires in the rear. On the other hand short chainstay bikes have poor front traction and require a big jump in front tire traction to attempt to maintain balance. This mostly applies to L & XL bikes btw. It's hard to have too short of chainstays on a size small bike.
4) Some rear suspension platforms have poor traction (i.e. SI) where-as others have much higher traction (i.e. HL) so this can be a determining factor as well in tire choice. My Yeti really needed an aggressive/ wide/ slower rolling rear tire to climb the same loose climb that my Foxy or SJ Evo can walk right up with a much faster less aggressive rolling rear tire.
5) Momentum, more available as a result of a fast rolling set up, can be used as an offset to absolute climbing traction if you know how to use it to your advantage. Try hitting a typical punchy climb going 40% faster on XC tires than you do on your enduro bro tires and you'll find a lot of times you have crested the top before even needing to pedal much, much less spin out.

There are few absolutes in tire selection, but the least compromised tire I've ever encountered for a front very aggressive tire is the Tioga Edge 22 SOFT. In that application it has the absolute most traction combined with the lowest rolling resistance by a significant margin. That said, it's still a bit large & heavy for say my DC bike.

Every other tire I run on my bikes is real good as I've honed in on what works well, but not necessarily my final selection.
 

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You can certainly move in either direction from where you are, but a "sweet spot" is going to be relative to your terrain. From your name I'm guessing you're in the North East? If so I wouldn't run the aggressor period. It's dry specific. The DHF is a dry tire too but it's much more versatile.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's both. A Dissector / Rekon combo would give you grip and speed.

Or just run the 2.3 DHF (great tire) with something more like a Rekon / ardent / forecaster rear.
I had the dhf 2.3. Probably should have left that on the front instead of opting for the 2.5. The ardent I had on the rear broke loose way too much though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The Aggressor unfortunately “is” the Maxxis rear tire designed for decent pedaling, and cornering grip. You see it a lot on the back of “aggressive” bikes that are mostly ridden in dry conditions.

The Dissector is newer, but actually fills a similar use case as a “grips, and doesn’t suck to pedal” sort of tire.

But I’d guess that if the aggressor feels like a boat anchor to you, then the Recon is probably the right move. I don’t know if the dissector would be enough different to justify its purchase.
I think one of these 2 tires will end up on my bike next.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
It's usually the rear. That's where most of your body weight is when climbing. A Rekon is between the Ardent Race and Aggressor in rolling speed and grip. The Dissector is also a good front tire that match with it.
The Rekon definitely sounds like the tire that I’m probably looking for. Alot of options in the 2.4 size. I‘d have to do some research on exo or exo+, maxterra, etc. to see which would fit my needs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I prefer the Dissector over the Aggressor any day. A really common combo you see here in Colorado is the Assagai or DHF front, and Dissector in the back. I’m running Assagai front and Dissector rear in the dry season, then i move to a Magic Mary and Nobby Nic for the wetter rides.

The Aggressor is a weird tire. Works only in very dry condition, and it seems to be happy only within a specific PSI range that I can only find on occasion. Ive had that tire wash out on me unexpectedly a few times, and it also felt like a boat anchor to me too.

A DHF front, forekaster rear is a great all season ride as long as it’s not too dry. OP: If you want something pretty fast rolling for the rear, the Ikon or Rekon is a great choice. I run Rekons front and rear on my plus bike.
I have about 4 rides on this combo and so far the Aggressor hasn’t washed out on me yet, but I havent hit any wet condition yet either. I like how it grips but it just feels so heavy to me I actually think it hurts me more that it helps me on the climbs despite its grip.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The sweet spot on tire traction vs. low rolling resistance (plus puncture protection) varies greatly depending on the bike, the rider, trail conditions and so on.

My personality is that I enjoy optimizing things and tires really are one of the most obvious ways to change your bike. As such, I have a garage full of tires.

Ultimately you have to read ride reports from a few riders that you trust (I trust a handful of posters on this site more than the professionals when it comes to tire reviews), combine that with what you have found works for you most of the time, and then just buy and test a lot of tires.

A few general notes however:

1) About 65% of rolling resistance comes from the rear tire, because about 65% of your weight is on the rear tire. So most of the rolling resistance improvements come from the rear, which is convenient since most of us need less traction in the rear. The front tire still matters however.
2) I like slightly wider, softer and more aggressive front tire patterns, combined with closer spaced more narrow rear tire patterns. Actually the set up you have currently is one of the best in this category.
3) Short chainstays have more rear traction and often need less aggressive tires in the rear. On the other hand short chainstay bikes have poor front traction and require a big jump in front tire traction to attempt to maintain balance. This mostly applies to L & XL bikes btw. It's hard to have too short of chainstays on a size small bike.
4) Some rear suspension platforms have poor traction (i.e. SI) where-as others have much higher traction (i.e. HL) so this can be a determining factor as well in tire choice. My Yeti really needed an aggressive/ wide/ slower rolling rear tire to climb the same loose climb that my Foxy or SJ Evo can walk right up with a much faster less aggressive rolling rear tire.
5) Momentum, more available as a result of a fast rolling set up, can be used as an offset to absolute climbing traction if you know how to use it to your advantage. Try hitting a typical punchy climb going 40% faster on XC tires than you do on your enduro bro tires and you'll find a lot of times you have crested the top before even needing to pedal much, much less spin out.

There are few absolutes in tire selection, but the least compromised tire I've ever encountered for a front very aggressive tire is the Tioga Edge 22 SOFT. In that application it has the absolute most traction combined with the lowest rolling resistance by a significant margin. That said, it's still a bit large & heavy for say my DC bike.

Every other tire I run on my bikes is real good as I've honed in on what works well, but not necessarily my final selection.
All great into. Thank you. I think this new combo is causing me to lose momentum and that’s a huge issue. When it wasnt spinning out, I was actaully climbing alot easier on the Ardent Race then I am on the Aggressor. It’s really crazy how much different tires can change a bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You can certainly move in either direction from where you are, but a "sweet spot" is going to be relative to your terrain. From your name I'm guessing you're in the North East? If so I wouldn't run the aggressor period. It's dry specific. The DHF is a dry tire too but it's much more versatile.
Yes, NJ. I do alot of rides after rains where the roots are still wet, some muddy spots etc. The Rekon probably would have been a better choice.
 

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I have about 4 rides on this combo and so far the Aggressor hasn’t washed out on me yet, but I havent hit any wet condition yet either. I like how it grips but it just feels so heavy to me I actually think it hurts me more that it helps me on the climbs despite its grip.
The Aggressor isn't actually all that bad in the wet, assuming you don't have sticky mud. The problem with it is that its knobs are relatively close together, and fairly short. So it both packs up with mud pretty easily, and doesn't have the ability to really "dig" down into the soil all that much. So thats the main thing to be mindful when the trails get wetter IMO.

I've never honestly considered it a poor pedaling tire though, or a heavy one. In fact, it was on my list of potential tires to try during the summer time, if I ever wanted a easier pedaling tire :D. But thats more my perspective on tires than anything else (my current tires are like 1100g, and 1200g, and quite a bit more knobby), simply because of where I live (PNW, always riding in the wet).

I agree though, based on how you're talking about it, It seems that the Recon is probably the next tire to try for you, and might be your perfect middle ground.
 

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I mentioned ardent which is different than an ardent race. However it's an old tire. The Rekon does the best in hero dirt conditions and was very slidely in loose over hard. Never rode it in the wet so no comment.

Forecaster is aggressive XC and should roll only slightly slower than an ardent race.

3c will grip better in the wet, but wear out faster. Exo+ is a little heavier put probably better for a rear tire.

Rolling speed is probably forecaster, Rekon, dissector, aggressor.
 

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I've done the dissector front aggressor rear combo, it's pretty fast rolling (compared to say a 2.5" assegai/dhr II combo).. And works well in the dry/hardpack/rock that is southern AZ. Rekon would be a great rear choice IMO.

Actually, I have a 27mm I'd wheelset that I might do reckon f/R on for a lighter feel.
 
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