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What we need is more cliffs.

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There was a guy up in N.Georgia (Mulberry Gap) riding one of those things last weekend. He wasn't on the trails with it, but he was using it to ride around the camp facility. And yea, it looked super sketchy.
 

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There was a guy up in N.Georgia (Mulberry Gap) riding one of those things last weekend. He wasn't on the trails with it, but he was using it to ride around the camp facility. And yea, it looked super sketchy.
seriously? fool was too lazy to walk around Mulberry Gap? The place isn't enormous.
 

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There was a guy up in N.Georgia (Mulberry Gap) riding one of those things last weekend. He wasn't on the trails with it, but he was using it to ride around the camp facility. And yea, it looked super sketchy.
I saw a kid at Blankets on some kind of motorized off-road skateboard riding The Holler.
 

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mine never sees the dirt, but it makes my 22 mile commute to work much more fun...
Commuting is an excellent use for eBikes. I commute to work year round on my Moonlander. Many days the snow conditions are too soft, deep, windy, etc, but I ride when I can. I seriously considered buying a Norco Bigfoot eBike the summer of ‘20 but the cost and lack of availability prevented me from going forward on that. Even though it had 80mm wheels and couldn’t fit as big of tires I felt it would enable me to ride more often and get me there with less sweat. But I also wondered about the long term reliability of the eBike motor. I’ve had plenty of BB’s go out since the 80’s and you can’t get much more basic than those. Since I keep my stuff for many years I was thinking about how expensive it would be to service the ebike motor. Maybe they are good for 5,000-10,000 miles. I don’t know?

Earlier this week I looked up that bike again and couldn’t believe how much it increased in price. Pretty bad when you can buy a Yamaha TW200 fat tire motorcycle for less than the cost of an electric bike I still have to pedal.
 

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Yes those are out there along with One Wheels and private stand up scooters and segway type self balancing toys and Amazon Jetson ebike toys, countless mini fat ebike toys (Radcity I think is probably Amazon as I see those everywhere). Not really worth the money for a solid form of transportation as your basic, low power, generic ebike kit costs $200-300 (Yescomusa, leafbike, mxus, qs, crc, greentimeevfitting, em3ev, grintech, luna, bmsbattery) without a battery that you put on a bicycle you already have.

Normal sized fat bikes (26x3.50-4.00) are great for winter riding, I had a costco fat bike (1x7) then a 604 fat bike (1x8) and slapped on a hub motor, controller, throttle and battery and was rocking and rolling within the hour.
I'm not cool with over paying for transport methods but I can see the appeal for something small that you can carry with you instead of locking up. I bet a lot of people are spending a lot of money on those rental stand up scooters where they could have just spent $800-$1500 for their own but the appeal to renting them is you can just dump them in the middle of the sidewalk and not care parking it. I play dominoe's with them lined up all the time.
 

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Normal sized fat bikes (26x3.50-4.00) are great for winter riding, I had a costco fat bike (1x7) then a 604 fat bike (1x8) and slapped on a hub motor, controller, throttle and battery and was rocking and rolling within the hour.
I'm not cool with over paying for transport methods but I can see the appeal for something small that you can carry with you instead of locking up. I bet a lot of people are spending a lot of money on those rental stand up scooters where they could have just spent $800-$1500 for their own but the appeal to renting them is you can just dump them in the middle of the sidewalk and not care parking it. I play dominoe's with them lined up all the time.
To become a more widely accepted form of commuting we need large businesses to help facilitate better parking/storage for bikes, e- or not. The Hospital where I work (children's) is next to an adult hospital. The Adult Hospital put in some really nice bike boxes when they built a new parking structure. I don't see many employees using them, but they have at least tried. If companies really want adopters those sorts of things should get premium "parking" spots right in front of the workplace or better-yet inside the workplace next to some showers. Unfortunately my hospital only has a few bike rack spots, and not at every building, but I am pretty sure our employees could use the other hospitals boxes if they wanted, they are pretty much open to the public, just not in a very convenient location.

I know is sounds dumb, but giving bicycles the best "parking" would be a boon to adoption, it would make those riding instead of driving feel a bit privileged.
 

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To become a more widely accepted form of commuting we need large businesses to help facilitate better parking/storage for bikes, e- or not. The Hospital where I work (children's) is next to an adult hospital. The Adult Hospital put in some really nice bike boxes when they built a new parking structure. I don't see many employees using them, but they have at least tried. If companies really want adopters those sorts of things should get premium "parking" spots right in front of the workplace or better-yet inside the workplace next to some showers. Unfortunately my hospital only has a few bike rack spots, and not at every building, but I am pretty sure our employees could use the other hospitals boxes if they wanted, they are pretty much open to the public, just not in a very convenient location.

I know is sounds dumb, but giving bicycles the best "parking" would be a boon to adoption, it would make those riding instead of driving feel a bit privileged.
Having just been in NYC over the weekend and witnessing the narrowing of streets to accommodate both outdoor dining shelters and bike lanes, one could only hope that people eventually get tired of driving and opt for other modes of transport.
 

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Having just been in NYC over the weekend and witnessing the narrowing of streets to accommodate both outdoor dining shelters and bike lanes, one could only hope that people eventually get tired of driving and opt for other modes of transport.
my city did the same last year with the extra outdoor dining and retail spaces and it sounds like the city wants to make it permanent at least in some spots because it went over so well. our city streets are already pretty narrow, though, so a lot of the streets in downtown don't have bike lanes. still...I am less bothered by riding on the downtown streets mixed in with everything else, because speed limits are generally 25mph with short distances between blocks.

I want to see more dedicated and separated/protected bike infrastructure on the busier, higher speed limit roads. the faster the car traffic, the more protection and separation I want to see for bikes/peds.

parking is a big deal, too. I see so much token substandard bike parking. big box stores spend money for nice bike racks, but then they put them in super quiet, dark areas around the side or back of the store, which makes it easier for bike thieves to be sneaky and gives them time to work. put the racks right next to the front door. not only is it prime parking and incentivizes bike use, but it puts the parking out where more people will see it and that alone will discourage at least some bike theft.

not only that, but I'm loathe to lock my bike up where it's unprotected from the weather when I'm at work all day. theft risk aside, that kind of repeated exposure to the elements is hard on bike gear. one big determinant of whether I've bike commuted in the past has been the ability to bring the bike inside for the day.

more specific to these e-things hitting the world, I don't like how basic safety becomes such a low priority for them. A big problem for those e-scooters that hit big so quickly was their terrible handling. tiny wheels that don't handle rough pavement well. geometry that makes them super twitchy. and now a throttle and motor that lets them go faster than is probably safe for such a device. Scooters that look more like bicycles with bicycle wheels (even just 20 or 24" wheels) are SO MUCH BETTER, safer as they are, and a better platform to electrify for mobility. Yes, they're bigger and more difficult to park. But stacking the damn things on the sidewalks blocking everybody else isn't a solution, either.

The single-wheeled things and the ones that use electronic gyros and crap for stability are just dumb. the video of the technobro going as fast (or faster than) the car traffic and then face planting on the pavement is a great example of how this is just a really stupid idea. Sure, these things are small and much easier to stash in an office. But the combination of speed and the inherent instability of a narrow, single-wheeled design is just a really bad combination. At least the OneWheel things give that single wheel a really wide footprint and a super low center of gravity.
 

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The single-wheeled things and the ones that use electronic gyros and crap for stability are just dumb. the video of the technobro going as fast (or faster than) the car traffic and then face planting on the pavement is a great example of how this is just a really stupid idea. Sure, these things are small and much easier to stash in an office. But the combination of speed and the inherent instability of a narrow, single-wheeled design is just a really bad combination. At least the OneWheel things give that single wheel a really wide footprint and a super low center of gravity.
I got my first Onewheel three summers ago and it‘s a fun way to commute to work. I can‘t justify the price for any of the models, they are all very expensive but well made and come from a US company in California. The newest and most expensive OW models have okay range but don’t compare favorably with either an eBike or EUC. But compared to an eBike an OW is basically maintenance free. You just make sure the tire has air, charge it up and ride. I’ve got almost 900 miles on my first OW and the tire isn’t yet worn out.

But, range anxiety is a big issue with the OW and something you don’t have to worry about with a regular bike. I can see it being a viable alternative to a bike if you don’t have your own office to store a bike, don’t have a place to change clothes, or your commute is just such a hassle you arrive all sweaty and gross no matter what you do. An OW will easily fit in a cubicle or under a desk and even though it works your muscles and core to ride it, you don’t get sweaty and gross.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Just wait til y'all witness sParty load his ebike and one wheel into his ecar.
I’ll put that one wheeled uni gizmo in place of the wheel on my BOB trailer, then pull it with my ebike.

E-ROCKET SHIP!!!
=sParty
 

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In major cities in China it was commonplace to see people commuting on electric scooters and most were small enough to be taken inside offices and apartments and not left on the streets. There are decided advantages to a folding e-bike like the Vika+ Flex from Blix Bikes that sells for $1,499 with free shipping in the continental US. The price includes good wheel fenders and a sturdy rear rack and integrated headlight and tailight powered by the battery pack.
 
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