Mountain Bike Reviews Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Gangbusters
Joined
·
912 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Thought I would start a thread for the newbies (like myself)! All you pros who wanna help out and share your smarts, post up a tip: what ever you want, maybe regarding tire pressure, seat hight, padding choice, weight shifting for corners, trail building etc.....please take 2 mins to post one tip and I am sure a lot of people will thank you for your help! If this thread stays on topic it could be a nice tool and maybe become a sticky!

Even though I am a newbie to DH, I know this from all my years of riding AM:

When riding, it is best to focus on the trail ahead of you, not directly infront of your front tire. Let your eyes scan the trail and pick the best line. Too many newbies worry about what their front tire is about to ride over, rather than scouting the trail ahead so they are in the right position for the berm, drop, rockgarden or root railway etc.


MKR
 

·
SuperInstigator
Joined
·
2,169 Posts
mkrobert81 said:
What is a track stand? Can you give a couple tips on how to exicute it?
I'm no pro, but I'll try to pretend...

A trackstand is used when you need to rest before a techy section, or during a technical section when you need to make deliberate moves highly dependent on balance.

First, start facing uphill. Position your "starting foot" just a few degrees higher than your other pedal. Your cranks should be about parallel to the ground, with your starting foot a little higher. You should be off the saddle, standing on the pedals, with your knees NOT locked. They should be bent slightly. Turn the front wheel and about a 45 degree angle left or right (I feel more comfortable when the wheel is turned left, but it comes down to personal preference), or whatever feels most natural when you're at a stand still. Rock back and forth using the drivetrain. As Ryan Leech says, at first your correctional movements will be rough and unrefined, but as you practice, they will become much more subtle.

Why didn't I just post this vid?????:p


Good Luck!
Tim
 

·
SuperInstigator
Joined
·
2,169 Posts
My personal tip is to not just practice bunnyhops, trackstands, manuals, etc., but to go out and ride trails and use natural obstacles as well as man made ones to practice on. It gets boring to just do the same thing over and over again, unless you increase the challenge factor, and just have fun.

Ride the line that can't be ridden! Then ride it again.

Oh, and videotaping yourself doing bunnyhops and stuff is also a good way to learn when you can see the mistakes you made, but be sure to mix in some fun stuff!

Tim
 

·
SuperInstigator
Joined
·
2,169 Posts
545cu4ch said:
Bunny hops are pretty damn useful to learn
Also, learn to follow the terrain with your arms and legs instead of letting the suspension do all the work
I agree. A pump track will help you learn to absorb obstacles, and use downhills and little valleys to your advantage. If you don't have a pump track, then just practice, absorbing obstacles on trails and pushing and flowing into downhills.
Tim
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top