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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The 06 model is awsome it seems like the pad material changed, It was loud untill it was broken in, now its silent, no studdering, no vibration no noise, great stopping power, cut hoses did not have to bleed them, cool.
 

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Does anyone know how to differentiate between 2005 and 2006 Juicy 7's???

I thought I purchased 2005 Juicy's but it came with the split lever clamp that I heard belonged to 2006. The 185mm rotor has 3 holes in each wave.

Is there any real difference between the two years?

I called SRAM and the tech was no help at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
06 model

The 06 has the split clamp and it seems like the pad material has changed. I did not notice any difference in the rotor.

ahimanic said:
Does anyone know how to differentiate between 2005 and 2006 Juicy 7's???

I thought I purchased 2005 Juicy's but it came with the split lever clamp that I heard belonged to 2006. The 185mm rotor has 3 holes in each wave.

Is there any real difference between the two years?

I called SRAM and the tech was no help at all.
 

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I just bought a new 2006 Gary Fisher Paragon equipped with Avid Juicy 7's. On the first two rides the brakes were quite nice. Silent, good modulation and adequate stopping power. On my third ride the performance has deteriorated terribly. The brakes make an odd noise as if I'm am choking a Turkey...gobble...gobble. They pulsate and leave me wondering if I'll get stopped at all? The weird thing is that I have another bike that is almost identical in set up only it's the GF Rig model equipped with Avid Mechanicals. The rotors are the same on both bikes and they both use the same pads. Both bikes have a 185mm polygon front rotor and a 160mm polygon rear rotor. So why do my hydros SUCK so badly and my mechanicals work flawlessly? These are both hardtail bikes so there's no monkey motion in the rear that sometimes effects braking, shifting, etc.

My girlfriend has Juicy 5's and she has suffered from the same problems. After a couple of months the noise and pulsating eventually went away. Another buddy of mine has Juicy 7's and his brakes SUCK as badly as mine. He often complains about the braking inconsistency and their grabby nature. I have found that these brakes perform the worst in slow speed braking situations and mildly better at speed. I just can't figure what happened to them between Sunday and Wednesday? Suddenly they went from good to terrible. I just don't get it and Avid doesn't seem to have any answers???? These are their top of line offering and they seem to have not field tested them? I am very, very disappointed in my Avid Juicy 7's. So much that I might eat the cost and toss them in the garbage. That seems like the most fitting place for them.
 

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I just installed the Juicy 7 on my bike but I used the existing rotor and pad off of my old BB7. The pads and rotors were already bedded in so I realized full braking power right off the bat. The combination has worked well and was quiet during my first ride. I'll have to observe longer to see but some have reported success using the BB7 Clean Sweep rotors with Juicy 7's.

I will slap the new Juicy 7 Polygon rotor and new pads on to go with the Juicy 7 caliper since it's a 185mm and my old Clean Sweep was only 160mm. I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
 

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Please excuse my last negative comments. I should probably hold judgement until these brakes are properly bedded in. I was just expecting superior performance as compared to my less costly mechanical disc brakes. Thus far that has not been the case. I might try a different brand pad and see how that works? I'll give them a couple of weeks and then I'll report back.
 

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I don't blame you for your frustration...as it has been shared by many.

Now that you brought it up, I didn't notice much difference in the stopping power between my old BB7 and the new Juicy. They feel very similar to me. In fact, I left the rear BB7 160mm intact as I didn't have time to swap the rear yet and the left hydraulic lever and the right cable lever have pretty similar feel. The physical dimensions are very close and with the help of the speed dial knob on both levers I can make the contact point of the pads the same on both brakes.

My impression that both brakes have similar power may have something to do with the fact that I adjust the pads way back so my levers don't activate the brakes until they are pretty close to the grips. My hands are not that big and I like to keep a finger on each lever when I descend. I'll have to reserve judgment until I get more time on the Juicy 7. I do hope it has more power than BB7!
 

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Slap in some Semi-Metallic pads like Galfers or Kool-Stops.. semi-metallics are less grabby but a little less powerful, which in an Avid doesn't matter that much as they're powerful as an anchor.

Thos will generate less heat and probably less noise, but don't quote me on the last one.
 

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Have a good mechanic take a look

I've been using my Juicies 7 for almost a year now. I believe a lot of the problems people are having with these brakes are due to some bad settings and maintenance. I'm no mechanic and don't deal with my brakes beside the usual pad alignment once in a while. I'm lucky though that LBS is the local distributor and service station for all Sram stuff. If my brakes start to fake just a bit it's a 5 min' ride to the bike doctor and then some 5 minutes more for perfection again. He's a gifted mechanic and basically supports and services all Avids in this country, and there's quite a few. Anyway, he insists that if you know what you're doing these brakes should always work flawlessly. Indeed in local forums everybody is happy with their Juicies around here and even more from the support and service offered by the local distributor. I therefore think that experimenting with all sorts of combinations not done by a qualified mechanic may cause all these troubles.
 

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copello said:
I've been using my Juicies 7 for almost a year now. I believe a lot of the problems people are having with these brakes are due to some bad settings and maintenance. I'm no mechanic and don't deal with my brakes beside the usual pad alignment once in a while. I'm lucky though that LBS is the local distributor and service station for all Sram stuff. If my brakes start to fake just a bit it's a 5 min' ride to the bike doctor and then some 5 minutes more for perfection again. He's a gifted mechanic and basically supports and services all Avids in this country, and there's quite a few. Anyway, he insists that if you know what you're doing these brakes should always work flawlessly. Indeed in local forums everybody is happy with their Juicies around here and even more from the support and service offered by the local distributor. I therefore think that experimenting with all sorts of combinations not done by a qualified mechanic may cause all these troubles.
Well, perhaps these SRAM mechanics should share their insights with the general public--in the form of FAQ on the Avid website.

The stuttering and squealing of Juicy's is a real problem and Avid is well aware of it. If there are solutions out there by these mechanics I don't see the advantage of keeping them from users.

I don't quite buy the "not set up properly" or "if you know what you're doing" explanation from people. Disc brake setup is not rocket science and setting up an Avid is even more straight forward. If there are some tricks to perfect an install they should be included in the Avid manual.
 

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This is what I have recently discovered. As my previous posts suggests I was having much difficulty with my Juicy's. They were squealing and pulsating horribly. However, I have since cured the problem by reinstalling new rotors and pads and being very diligent about bedding them in properly. All disc brakes require a gradual break in process and I was quick to hit the trail and start grabbing a hand full of lever. What I believe I did was to create hot spots on the rotors and grazed the pads. After installing the new rotors and pads I went out on a solo ride in a controlled environment and spent about 30 minutes coming to a gradual stop. I increased the stopping power progressively and upon hitting the trail I made an effort to modulate myself to a stop and never locked them down. Thus far, the brakes are working better than ever with no squealing and excellent modulation. A friend of mine who races motorcycles recommended that I approach it this way and I believe he is correct. With previous brakes I had bedded them in a similar fashion and they always worked well. I think the Avid's might be more susceptible to hot spotting compared to other brakes I have used but I feel if you take the time they should perform as well as expected. Buying new rotors and pads is a costly proposition but it's worth it for peaceful riding experience.
 

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ahimanic said:
Well, perhaps these SRAM mechanics should share their insights with the general public--in the form of FAQ on the Avid website.

The stuttering and squealing of Juicy's is a real problem and Avid is well aware of it. If there are solutions out there by these mechanics I don't see the advantage of keeping them from users.

I don't quite buy the "not set up properly" or "if you know what you're doing" explanation from people. Disc brake setup is not rocket science and setting up an Avid is even more straight forward. If there are some tricks to perfect an install they should be included in the Avid manual.
Well, I have to agree that setting up a pair of brakes should be a brief and hassle free. I also wish everybody could solve every problem themselves. Evidently that's not happening and many people complain and have real issues. My point is that when your car brakes you go to a mechanic, at least most people, and a FAQ or detailed manual won't help. In smaller scale but just the same, the qualified Avid mechanic tends to solve most problems and is qualified to call if a part is bad, needs replacement and change it on spot if that's the case, as he has all spare parts in shop. Not every problem is a 'solve by manual' case and an observation by a pro is needed.
However that's all excluding the stuttering issue.
Trying to solve the stuttering, the dealer here is changing rotors to 06' model free of charge to anyone suffering from the problem, claiming it's an unfortunately known issue, (changed mine). After it didn't quite solve the stutter completely, although improving the condition, he now says the problem might also be in the pads and Avid should have new stutter-free pads soon. It seems that on this issue Avid keep their dealers mystified too, so go figure. Anyway, Avid support, and all Sram stuff for that matter, is quite something around here. The dealer is jumping out of his skin to get you back riding ASAP. Once I found I was stuck with a bad Rockshock late Friday before a long Saturday trip, when I knew I wouldn't make it to the shop on time. I was about to cancel the trip. I then called the guy just to find out if he can give me some tip on phone. The dude surprised me and came over to my house with some spare parts, and fixed it on spot. He bought me then forever, and my bike is today is all Sram stuff.
 
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