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Discussion Starter #1
This started out as a desire to build an ultra light XC tool for my those quick midweek after work rides. There's a lesser known area popular around here with the XC crowd who built up and maintain the trails. As such its got great flow without any real gnar. Narrow flowy trails with punchy climbs good for training on.

Being a tall dude (6'4"), most of the Chiner HT frames are either non-existent in XL or the geo is laughable. Recently i was browsing the LightCarbon.com site and found the LCM908 frame was actually thoughtfully sized with geo that is usable. 480 reach means i wont be too cramped and the lower stack and heat/seat angles are conservative XC numbers so she'll be quick through the trees.

With all the decent, usable carbon WW parts out there on the AliX, combined with known reputable brands for reliability where it counts and a few boutique brands thrown in for some bling, a new project was borne!

This bike, as seen, clocks in at 17.5 lbs and, at the time, cost $2800 USD to build. It is *very* light, *extremely* fun and accelerates like a rocketship!

I decided to have a bit of fun with the build and make a VLog of it along the way. Check it out and give me a Like and Subscribe if you enjoyed it!


Parts List

Frame: LightCarbon.com LCM908 Carbon Hardtail
https://www.lightcarbon.com/lightwei...meset_p42.html
Fork: LightCarbon.com FKM-TD01-29 PLUS
https://www.lightcarbon.com/lightcar...-fork_p49.html

Wheels: Stan's Valor Carbon 29e'rs, MicroSpline Driver
Rotors: Ashima AiRotor 160mm + Titanium bolts
Cassette: Gabaruk 12sp 10-52
https://www.garbaruk.com/12-speed-sh...ml?category=11
Tires: Maxxis Forekasters, 29x2.2
Sealant: Orange Endurance

Crankset: e*Thirteen XCX Cabon Race Cranks, 170mm
https://www.ethirteen.com/products/x...-carbon-cranks
Chainring: Gabaruk 32 Oval
https://www.garbaruk.com/e13-e-thirt...ml?category=20
BB: e*Thirteen PF92
Pedals: Carbon flat with Titanium shaft
https://www.aliexpress.com/item/32964992300.html

Derailleur: Shimano XT M8100 12sp
Shifter: Shimano XT M8100 12sp
Chain : Shimano XT M8100 HyperGlide+

Brakes: Shimano XTR M8000 front and rear

Handlebars: Carbon Hixon Clone, 760x60
Grips: 2 Dolla Foam!
Steerer plug: Specialized carbon plug
Stem spacers+cap: Deity

Frame Protection:
Vertex Kryptek Vinyl Pattern
3M Clear Film
Lettering: DYILettering.com
https://doityourselflettering.com/

Bottle Cage: eBay
Front Fender: Mucky Nutz

Total Claimed Grams7661
Total Claimed Lbs16.87
Total Actual Grams7,857
Total Actual Lbs17.31

PartClaimed WeightActual WeightActual (lb)
LCM908 frame XL1,1801,3102.89
LCM rigid carbon fork5605761.27
Stan's valor wheels1,3861,3863.05
Ashima 160 rotors/no adapters1461440.32
Ti rotor bolts16160.04
FK 2.2 TR x2 tires1,2801,2642.78
Garmin speed sensor0.00
Chiner bars2202300.51
Stan's Speedsync MS driver0.00
Fork steerer bung28280.06
seat clamp10100.02
foam grips34340.07
Elita one carbon seat post1751740.38
Elita one carbon saddle95960.21
Tire sealant1801800.40
XT M8100 derailleur2802800.62
XT M8100 shifter1171940.43
XT M8100 chain2522520.56
XTR M9000 brakeset2102080.46
XTR M9000 brakeset1941900.42
Gabaruk Cassette3353350.74
Gabaruk E13 oval chainring63600.13
E13 XCX cranks3453440.76
E13 XCX bottom bracket92920.20
Carbon Pedals1721600.35
Headset spacers + cap19240.05
frame protection0.00
front axle90900.20
rear axle40400.09
LC headset64640.14
Garmin mount12120.03
front fender30280.06
Bottle cage14140.03
Bar ends22220.05

 

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ACHOO
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4,434 Posts
Hey, great post and nice build! If you can get away with the rigid fork, why not?

Just a note re the carbon cutting, you aren't shown, but I hope you had a mask. (I guess we all have masks now, ha!) Also, I think the dust can conduct electricity, so keep cameras/phones/computers away.

Thanks for the vid and parts list too, BTW.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, appreciate the reply! My bandsaw has a HEPA dust collector so the majority of the dust is captured on the fly. If you squint hard enough, you can see the chips getting whisked away where the vid slows down on the cut. :p
 

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ACHOO
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4,434 Posts
Thanks, appreciate the reply! My bandsaw has a HEPA dust collector so the majority of the dust is captured on the fly. If you squint hard enough, you can see the chips getting whisked away where the vid slows down on the cut. :p
Yep, saw the extraction setup which is great, but not perfect. Just wanted to call this out for all of us, as carbon dust is dangerous, and I suspect a lot of us may not even have the setup that you have.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I took the Green Weenie *giggedy* on its inaugural ride the other day on some trails that i knew would be a bit much for a rigid with no dropper. I intentionally did this because i wanted to see how it was to actually not have a dropper or any squish to smooth out the ride. There were some things that surprised me and others that were not surprising.

I was super surprised on how fast it accelerates and the general feel of lightness. All my other bikes have been in the 30lb range (1 AL hardtail, 1 CF full sus) and this is a massive difference. Pedaling is met with immediate and very responsive forward thrust. The bike is almost twitchy compared to a 30 pounder but satisfyingly so. Not surprisingly, climbing is certainly better but i was not prepared for how utterly amazing it would be. I found myself in a higher gear than normal and still pedaling fine. Strava says beat all my uphill climb PR's previously set on my Ripley on this first ride out. Not just a little, but by a HUGE margin.

I was surprised at how little one does need a dropper on descents. When you have one, you tend to use it liberally and instinctually. I found my thumb instinctively reaching for a lever at the first sight of a trail pointing DH but was met with nothing but bar! Fortunately, each time i lived to tell the tale. Simply moving your ass rearward a little along with dropping your torso low gives enough stability for mild descents. The downside is the wide part of the saddle really beats the hell out of your thighs this way.

I was surprised at how well it rode fully rigid and on low volume tires. Now the trails were mostly smooth, but many sections of roots sprinkled in. This describes many of the trail systems here with varying levels of hills. Certainly bumpy over this, but still manageable and the bike bunny hops like its not even there! Even mild root stair step drops were fine.

I was kinda surprised that the Ashima rotors didn't have ton of stopping power. They're only 160's and the small surface area doesn't have much bite so perhaps thats why. I don't forsee myself getting that rowdy with this bike so the amount of braking is sufficient, but the feel is hugely diminished from my Ripley with more robust 180's.

I was not surprised the tiny CF pedals were garbage. In one ride, one of the pins popped out which there is probably 0 chance to get any replacements. Also they pedals are so small and pins so dull, my feet were bouncing all over them on the bumpy sections. I'll be putting a different pair of flats on for the time being, but i think this might be my first foray into clips.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yep, saw the extraction setup which is great, but not perfect. Just wanted to call this out for all of us, as carbon dust is dangerous, and I suspect a lot of us may not even have the setup that you have.
I hear you on that. If i was doing a ton of this, i'd use my welding respirator in conjunction.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I can report that this bike is a blast and the way it accelerates is amazing. Down at another local trailsystem, i PR'd several of the segments that are flat and peddley or uphill. Downhill, its a bit terrifying though! I'm tall so not being able to get down without a dropper is unnerving and leaved my center of gravity way too high for my liking.

I can totally get along with the rigid suspension aspect, but the dropper is way too ingrained to forgo. Many of the trails around here a short punchy ups and downs that you just can't avoid so i had to upgrade the seatpost to a BikeYoke Divine SL. Its only 80mm of travel but it seems that it is enough after some testing dropping the seatpost that much and riding features. Still not enough to get super rowdy but gives me some room to breathe around the cockpit without banging my thighs on the seat whose sharp edges were tearing me up a bit.
 
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