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Negative Rep Points!!!!
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4,162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
We came across this guy and his wife camping last weekend. He had one of the early version AMP bikes that was heavily influenced/designed by Horst Leitner. Czech out that first generation Horst link rear end.

DT was impressed with how this rear end felt, but knew that he could improve on it. He left AMP bikes, grabbed a sheet of paper, and penned a modified setup, employing a rocker and relocated shock. The idea was to stiffen things up. Although Horst's design was efficient, it was a bit noodley. And, Turner Suspension Bikes was born.

Anyway....this thing was mint! The mechanical disk brakes felt strong. The Girvin inspired fork was a work of art. There was some solid CAD work on this bike!

And the motorhome? That was another story in itself. The name of this thing escapes me...but, it was designed by the same guy who designed the 1967 Beechcraft airplane. It does look like an early 60's aeroplane sans wings, no?

Very cool shtuff!
 

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Surfin' da mountain
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809 Posts
The AMP design is what drove me to the Turner!

The upper pic, below, is a B3. Its my first mountain bike, which infact I still have.

The pic above is a B4.

The pic below was my yellow B5. The B5 rode incredible when everthing was working. It went through pivot bushings like no body's business though. And AMP's shock was nothing short of junk.

Beacuse the AMP bikes, although noodley and delicate, rode really great I chose to replace them with a Turner. In 2003 I bought an XCE because of its similar profile and reported durability.
And I can attest to the durability. I haven't ridden my new SPOT yet, its at the LBS being assembled.

By the way, I like the motor home's leveling system!
 

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Pixie Dust Addict
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3,366 Posts
Before I was a Turner owner, I rode a B3 for about 5 years. The shock was [email protected], but you could rebuild it with only 1 non-everyday tools (a fitting to hold the shock in a vise). The frame was noodly, but the bike was light. I replaced the AMP shock with a Stratos and upgraded the fork to the "long travel" F4 fork and added the TWP (Floyd Landis' sponsor when he was racing MTBs) brace for the seatstay. Probably built up to around 25 lbs. At the end of the day, it was just way too flexy. Loved the mac strut design for the type of riding I do, so I got my first Turner (a SID blue Stinger) and it's only gone downhill from there.
 

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Self Appointed Judge&Jury
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41,439 Posts
Nice find, too bad it wasn't left in stock trim. IMO the disc brakes have got to go. I remember seeing quite a few of those being raced at the Norba races in Big Bear in the early nintys.
 

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Baked Alaskan
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1,810 Posts
That motorhome is dope. Looks like a spacecraft from a 50's TV show. The rear on the Amp is tiny, there must be some serious flex going on back there compared to the Turner rear. Cool piece of MTB history though. I like that funky Jamis CF bike too. Wasn't that the Diablo? Its like a camping and biking museum. Perhaps there are some ano purple pieces lurking somewhere in the spaceship.
 

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Premium Member
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3,029 Posts
Sweet find. Still have a sweet spot for linkage forks.

The AMP bikes were more than influenced by Horst - Horst was the head of the company AFAIK.

The fork predates the Girven/Noleen/K2 model by a bit. It was coming stock on some Mongoose and Univega bikes in 93/94. Short travel stuff though, they had 2" and later a 3" model. Light, Tracked great, not 'supple' for the 2", but the 3" was a big improvement.

The brakes are another story too... If I remember correctly they were a cable actuated hydraulic system. 3 Bolt rotors. Rock Shox bought out the design and ran it after Amp was done with it for a year or two. Still some stuff floating on the web.

They're a few examples that hide in the VRC forum from time to time.

I'd love to see what someone could do with a modern linkage fork. :)

JmZ

Aquaholic said:
We came across this guy and his wife camping last weekend. He had one of the early version AMP bikes that was heavily influenced/designed by Horst Leitner. Czech out that first generation Horst link rear end.

DT was impressed with how this rear end felt, but knew that he could improve on it. He left AMP bikes, grabbed a sheet of paper, and penned a modified setup, employing a rocker and relocated shock. The idea was to stiffen things up. Although Horst's design was efficient, it was a bit noodley. And, Turner Suspension Bikes was born.

Anyway....this thing was mint! The mechanical disk brakes felt strong. The Girvin inspired fork was a work of art. There was some solid CAD work on this bike!

And the motorhome? That was another story in itself. The name of this thing escapes me...but, it was designed by the same guy who designed the 1967 Beechcraft airplane. It does look like an early 60's aeroplane sans wings, no?

Very cool shtuff!
 

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Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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12,942 Posts
JmZ said:
The AMP bikes were more than influenced by Horst - Horst was the head of the company.

The fork predates the Girven/Noleen/K2 model by a bit. It was coming stock on some Mongoose and Univega bikes in 93/94. Short travel stuff though, they had 2" and later a 3" model. Light, Tracked great, not 'supple' for the 2", but the 3" was a big improvement.

The brakes are another story too... If I remember correctly they were a cable actuated hydraulic system. 3 Bolt rotors. Rock Shox bought out the design and ran it after Amp was done with it for a year or two.JmZ
get this man a free pony ride! he nailed it all. cool stuff aqua.
 

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... I guess you won't be
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1,971 Posts
First full boinger I ever bought was a B-3 model, as a frame/fork that had been hanging on a local bike shop for a couple of years. I saw it every time I went in, but it was just too much $$. When the LBS put up their going out of biz sign, I went to the vulture sale, and saw it still up there.........I made an offer they couldn't refuse, and the rest is history.....

I loved that bike, it was the first mtb that rode like my ol' mx'ers....It took me a while to figure out that the F-3 fork was a POS, in both feel, and sturdiness, and off it went for a 1996 Judy [which I still have today - orig. plastic cartridges are still functioning!!???] - worst failure was the rear shock coming apart on me on a downhill - the spring shot off to the right, the collar and shaft eye bolt to the left - I found all the parts in the poison ivy and hand tighened it all back together and finished the ride! Try that with your fancypants shocks!......Don't have the AMP anymore, I sold it for a couple hundred to some poor suckah, but it was a fun bike that got me into my first Turner - funny thing, you might call the AMP B-3 a Turner, in a a different light, or a few beers.........
 

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fried stuff with cheese
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1,293 Posts
Former B3 owner. It would ride great if you didn't need to turn fast and for maybe a week after you sent the shock back to be rebuilt. It flexed in the wind and the shock held oil as well as a sock would. From what I knew they were still around (AMP) making motorcycle parts and hydraulic running boards for trucks. I just checked and it looks like their website is down so I have no clue if they are still around. You have to give credit to the pioneers. The ones that come up with a great idea, even if it's not implemented the best way. This is a perfect example. The Outland bikes are another. Both designs (whether you like them or not) spawned many different versions.

Oh, and I have to admit that I was disappointed a bit when I realized that this thread wasn't about the band.
 
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