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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We all dread the day the time comes that we get a trail side flat and have to use that little mini frame pump (unless you a satomasicist) Well my day came rather early, The bike is about a month old and has been ridden maybe 18 times.

On my first real bike ride with a group of people my rear tire was flat before we even started riding, sombody had a floor pump we pumped it up and it lasted all 30 miles and then held air for about a day, then was low (not flat) I inpsected the tire and had not ridden the bike yet so I knew it was a defective tube (probably valve stem) so I had to take it back to the LBS and hassle them abit and they put a new tube in for me.

Ok now for todays story, an after work 40 mile paved adventure, halfway thru at the very end of the trail I notice my handling felt very strange like I was fishtailing, after awhile I had it nailed as a flat tire (even tho the tire did not look flat) I pulled over and inspected the tire from side to side all the way round, not one piece of debris. So I started to get upset at the LBS because they had installed that replacement tube without the locknut that holds the valve in place so I figured I had another bad valve... But just like last time I figured it would hold air for me till I got home... So the torture session begins! 10-15 minutes later I have the tire at 45psi and Im ready to go home.

Not but 1/2 a mile down the trail its flat again!!! OMG so I knew I had to replace the tire, I am lucky enough to bike with a full backpack of gear including my spare tube. Its a rear tire flat too btw, so I have to take the rear tire off and go thru the whole process of chainging the tube. After all is said and done the torture fest begins again! This time I got it up to 50PSI nearly killing me as I was already tired from the first time, just before I got ready to mount the tire I relized that the tire bead didnt quite set in on the opposite side of the valve stem!!!! I was like OMG I debated that it would not matter and it would sink in while riding but I didnt take a chance and had to deflate the tire... loosten the locknut on the valve stem and fully seat the tire bead.

Now for the Third time I have to inflate the freakin tire... I got it up to 45psi taking several small breaks as my arm feels like its about to fall off and finaly I am ready to go, I learned 2 things 1 that its easier to remove/replace the rear tire with the bike upside down, 2 that I really hate frame pumps ^^

I had sombody finaly stop by and offer there CO2 pump for me on that final fill up but I turned them down as I feel bad using a consumable product when I have a pump already.

I think I may very well invest in one of those and a patch kit next.


Now that I am home I filled up the bath tub and pumped up the bad tube, I had to make it really big and put it under water to find a super small hole (like needle sized) just near the very center of the tube (as in the outside of the tube where it would touch the ground if it were the tire) So my best guess is that its from a spoke, now I am afriad my new tube might get a flat in the same place or it could have been horrible luck.

With the bike so new, if a flat is caused by a bad spoke should that be covered by the LBS or is that on me to worry about?

Thanks for reading my little story and the feedback.
 

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Fermented Grain Sampler
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古強者死神 said:
On my first real bike ride with a group of people my rear tire was flat before we even started riding, sombody had a floor pump we pumped it up and it lasted all 30 miles and then held air for about a day, then was low (not flat) I inpsected the tire and had not ridden the bike yet so I knew it was a defective tube (probably valve stem) so I had to take it back to the LBS and hassle them abit and they put a new tube in for me.
The bike was ridden. The tube was flat and all you did was put air into it again. No inspection of the inside of the tire to check for something? That's not the LBS's fault.
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古強者死神 said:
Now that I am home I filled up the bath tub and pumped up the bad tube, I had to make it really big and put it under water to find a super small hole (like needle sized) just near the very center of the tube (as in the outside of the tube where it would touch the ground if it were the tire) So my best guess is that its from a spoke, now I am afriad my new tube might get a flat in the same place or it could have been horrible luck.

With the bike so new, if a flat is caused by a bad spoke should that be covered by the LBS or is that on me to worry about?

Thanks for reading my little story and the feedback.
If the hole is "where it would touch the ground" then that's not a spoke. The spoke would cause a hole from the inside. Did you look at the rim to see if any spokes are poking through or causing too much bulging through the rim strip?
Did you use your hand to feel around inside the tire for small thorn, glass other crap? Many times that can flat a tire if not removed.
All that needs to be checked into before you can say its the spoke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yeah I inpsected the tire big time, but I could not see/find the hole at the time so I assumed it was a valve problem just like the first time.

I just got back from the lbs they said it was probably a sandspur or somthing because the hole is microscopic basicly and there is nothing on/in the tire at all.

I dont know why I thought it was a spoke when the hole is on the outside of the tire :/ I must have still been dazed from being in the sun for 4 hours and biking for so long with no sleep :p

I got a C02 pump while I was at the LBS so I am covered for next time if I need it.
 

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bee-man said:
Oh sh*t, I just bought a Black Burn Shorty. Hope I never get a flat!!!
Funny story.
One of the best compact pumps out there.....will actually inflate a tire to pressure.
 

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古強者死神 said:
With the bike so new, if a flat is caused by a bad spoke should that be covered by the LBS or is that on me to worry about?
Dude, sorry to hear you had to suffer with the mini-pump, but it's just a freakin flat! Fix it and get over it, leave the LBS out of it unless you want a reputation there as a PITA and know that they're laughing about you being a wuss behind your back.

I also hope you learned a basic lesson. If your tire is flat before a ride, NEVER think you can just "get by" with pumping it up instead of doing a proper fix. The tire went flat for a reason and it's gonna go flat again, especially when you're out beating it up on the trail. It only takes a couple minutes and even if your buds have to wait on you, it's a lot better to take care of it when you have access to a floor pump. Oh yeah, and get your own CO2 pump and a couple spare tubes to save yourself these headaches. And carry plenty of CO2 and/or still pack your pump along, just in case. After 5 flats in 6 miles like I had on one ride (damned thorns!!!), I can tell you you'll be glad you were prepared.
 

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And the moral of the story is?

In addition to your pump and/or CO2 (and I'd recommend both) :

1.) Always carry a patch kit.

2.) Always carry AT LEAST one spare tube.

3.) Know how to change a flat tire.

For what it's worth, I don't bother trying to patch the tube trailside. The patch kit is for emergencies.
 

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Move to the desert with cactus and you will become an instant flat tire expert. And yes I carry CO2 pump, hand pump, 2 spare tires and a patch kit. Never had to yes them all in one ride yet, but have had to walk out before I started carrying 2 spares.

If you want CO2 cheap, buy the pump that lets you use the unthreaded 12oz cans. Go to someplace the sell BB guns and buy those cartridges, they work fine, take 2 per tire but work fine.
 

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You convinced me

I stopped by REI last nite and got a CO2 pump (inflater) with a bunch of extra cargridges. I felt your pain all the way through the Internet. But I will still bring that silly little Crank Bros hand pump with me because I, like just about everyone that rides a bike, like a little needless pain every once in a while.

Rick
 

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ONe time I had to fix a friend's flat with my frame pump. It was the hardest pumping that our group of 3 had to keep taking turns to pump. Air would go in, but it had so much resistance it was like we were trying to fill up the tube through a needle hole. I tried reseating the pump on the valve several times with no improvements. We finally got it to "somewhat firm" and called it good enough. Then a week or so later I got a flat of my own and I was groaning before I even started because of the earlier experience. To my surprise the pump filled up the new tube smoothly and quickly, easily getting the tire nice and firm. THe bad experience must have had a messed up valve or something.
 

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古強者死神 said:
Yeah I inpsected the tire big time, but I could not see/find the hole at the time so I assumed it was a valve problem just like the first time.

I just got back from the lbs they said it was probably a sandspur or somthing because the hole is microscopic basicly and there is nothing on/in the tire at all.

I dont know why I thought it was a spoke when the hole is on the outside of the tire :/ I must have still been dazed from being in the sun for 4 hours and biking for so long with no sleep :p

I got a C02 pump while I was at the LBS so I am covered for next time if I need it.
If you get another flat, you could try swapping the rear tire for the front tire. See if the front tire goes flat. If it does, then you still have something sharp lodged in the tire, that is puncturing tubes.

old_dude
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Well I was away for awhile (son was sick in hospital) but me and him are back now, I made the trip to the LBS worth while I had to get my brakes and things adjusted and picked up a U-Lock and a CO2 pump.

I made sure the CO2 pump I got was multi compatable this one works on both types of valves and takes both threaded and non threaded 12+16 oz canisters.

as far as my pump (the frame pump) its a crank brothers alloy pump, works good just not somthing you want to do 3x. I think its abit too small to make it an easy job but it does have the dual settings (high pressure/high volume)
 

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古強者死神 said:
Well I was away for awhile (son was sick in hospital) but me and him are back now, I made the trip to the LBS worth while I had to get my brakes and things adjusted and picked up a U-Lock and a CO2 pump.

I made sure the CO2 pump I got was multi compatable this one works on both types of valves and takes both threaded and non threaded 12+16 oz canisters.

as far as my pump (the frame pump) its a crank brothers alloy pump, works good just not somthing you want to do 3x. I think its abit too small to make it an easy job but it does have the dual settings (high pressure/high volume)
Sounds good. My CO2 is one of the Second Wind models, with a tiny pump in case you're out of CO2. I'd hate to ever have to use it to actually air a tire, but it is handy to put a little air in a new tube when I'm mounting a tire. I often carry 5 or 6 cartridges in my Camelback, partly because I know I wouldn't enjoy using that pump, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Yeah the second wind is great thats the pump i was going to buy but none of the online retialers I was buying from had it. If I ever buy a 2nd air pump it will probably be a Toepeak Morph as its like a mini floor pump wich is really what I was hoping to find but didnt know there was one out there till today.
 

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You should learn how to check your tire more thoroughly. If you initally place the label of the tire right next to the valve it will mkae it easier to do the following. After you remove the busted tube, inspect where the hole is by pumping up the tire a little bit. If you took your tube out (and remembered where it was in relation to the tire's markings) you should be able to narrow down easily where to check the tire/rim. That will enable you to narrow your search down as far as where to search for the thing that caused the flat. Sometimes small pieces of glass or whatnot are hard to find unless you know where to look and expose the hole for contaminants.

If its on the inside i'm sure you know its on the rim side (probably either a snake bite if it looks like two stripes, rim strip defect (spoke or sharp part of the rim abrasioning the tube). This will help you not have to change a flat more than once. This is how my shop(s) that i've wrenched at have checked/fixed flats. Almost 100% foolproof.
 

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古強者死神 said:
So I started to get upset at the LBS because they had installed that replacement tube without the locknut that holds the valve in place so I figured I had another bad valve...

:rolleyes: geez, what a newbie. How long did you say you've been riding?
 

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Hey... everybody gets flats. Everybody learns to deal with it in their own unique way. Me, I was pinchflatting left and right. Hence, I went tubeless. :)
 

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Why do people make it sound like some form of ordeal to change a flat - Front OR Rear?????? It takes 5 mins and you're off, just buy a good mini-pump like the Topeak TURBO Morph. Seriously the most it should take you is 10 mins to change a difficult flat, even on the rear and remember you're changing the tube not the tyre.

One thing a lot of people new to the sport don't realise when changing a rear flat is that it helps a lot if you change to the smallest cog on the cassette, makes getting the wheeel on and off much easier. As with other stuff about b ikes you want to get good at, changing a flat is one of them - who wants to hold up a good group ride right? Practice changing your tyres at home so when you get on the trail and it happens you just get off, get it fixed and back to riding in no time at all.

Once again I say TOPEAK TURBO MORPH.
 
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