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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This bike almost didn't get built. After sitting for weeks upon receiving the new frame/fork, it was finally built most of the way, then partially dissasembled, then the frame/fork was up for sale for a day and a half, and then I cancelled the ad. Whew...talk about no love man, and I feel like a pschizoid to boot. I finally decided to just complete the build. I really love riding off-road drop-bar bikes, but it will never see any touring as thats not my bag(no pun intended). I am thinking of it as a skinnied-down Fargo single track machine as it will predominately only see trail use and I want to keep it as light as possible. Not what most people would want to buy a Fargo for but its a pretty versatile bike I think so we will see.




 

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Enjoyin' life....
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I agree. Great build and unique to boot. Sleek looking Fargo.

I'm on a mailing list for the next wave of Singular Gryphon frames and plan to first go single speed, then go 1x9 and just switch when I want to.
 

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808+909 = Party Good Time
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BigE610 said:
man i was looking at getting a d440 for a commuter but the fargo looks to be exactly what im looking for. back up trail bike/commuter/tour bike. do they come in a complete bike?
Last year the complete was all XT and a great setup. I think this year all reports are there will be an XT version and a cheaper SLX model. Both good options.

'09 Fargo
http://www.salsacycles.com/fargoComp09.html
 

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'Calm Down'
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Yep, you can buy them complete: http://www.salsacycles.com/fargoComp09.html

(I'm thinking about buying one as well.)

jw

BigE610 said:
man i was looking at getting a d440 for a commuter but the fargo looks to be exactly what im looking for. back up trail bike/commuter/tour bike. do they come in a complete bike?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the positive comments on the build guys. Mostly just re-used pieces and parts that I know have worked well for me in the past. The Fargo is definitely a well-built frame/fork with a variety of possible uses. As long as I can keep the crank-strikes to a minimum with the low BB, the 32T chainring is small enough to get me up and over most single track obstacles with decent clearance. I will have to test the drop height and may actually need to remove a spacer or two and lower it a bit, but right now it feels pretty good. I am looking forward to getting some miles on it soon, but the temps are up and the ground here in the midwest is a soppy mess.
 

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Harmonius Wrench
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Wow! I am surprised to see this, because I had seen the ad and your comments going into that and figured you were not feeling it for the Fargo. That would be understandable, it is one of those bikes that you either "get" or don't, seemingly. So it took me by surprise to see this thread.

I have about as many single track miles on mine as I do gravel. I think it is a hoot to carve single track on it. Hope you find it to be as fun as I do that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Guitar Ted said:
Wow! I am surprised to see this, because I had seen the ad and your comments going into that and figured you were not feeling it for the Fargo. That would be understandable, it is one of those bikes that you either "get" or don't, seemingly. So it took me by surprise to see this thread.

I have about as many single track miles on mine as I do gravel. I think it is a hoot to carve single track on it. Hope you find it to be as fun as I do that way.
Thanks for the feedback GT.

Yeah, I ran that ad for a day and a half, and then realized I was being way to premature. I really feel like I owe it to myself (and to the Fargo) to give it a go. I am very familiar with the high-front center tall head tube style of frame, and really want the purpose-built drop-bar oriented geometry. The Fargo delivers nicely on that front so that was never an issue for me. The construction and materials in the frame and fork are also top-notch, so I am happy with that too. Probably my biggest misgiving with the frameset is feeling guilty that I am not using it for what it was primarily designed for.The first thing that ran through my head was wondering where I can find some lightweight aluminum or plastic bolts to plug all of the braze-on holes with. I never use water bottles anymore and won't ever use a rack on the bike so the extra braze-ons are added weight and entry points for water and muck.

Then I started thinking about how much lighter the bike would be with a different rigid fork that wasn't built for touring with all of the braze-ons. This is what drives me to the point of questioning my choice in buying the Fargo in the first place. :confused: Its not the geometry of the frame at all, its really the inescapable fact thats its more utility oriented and heavier than I would like it to be. I looked hard at the Gryphon too, but its no lighter and although its a nice frame/fork I just could not bring myself to buy a frame with an EBB that I would never use. Short of having a custom frame built for me, the Fargo was the best choice. I realize that the Fargo is never going to be a "lightweight" bike, and I just need to quit thinking about it now that its built, and get some riding in. As long as it handles like I hope it will it should be a great little bike.

Thanks for the reply!

JR
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
MMcG said:
What is your gearing with that set up? 1x9 I'm guessing - but what is the cassette cluster and what size is that front ring?
Its an 11-34 shimano cassette with a 32T Salsa ring up front. I have considered going to a 30/40 2x9 set-up using Salsa rampless rings, but the simplicity of the 1x9 is pretty nice for most of the riding I do. I also have a nice 11-34 XTR cassette which I need to swap on, but for now with the weather and muck I figure the current cassette is probably more durable.
 

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trail rat
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N10S said:
I am thinking of it as a skinnied-down Fargo single track machine as it will predominately only see trail use and I want to keep it as light as possible.

I really like this bike! I wondered when I would see the light, simple, single track ride concept of the Fargo. Now I know. Most folks want to load it up and be the vagabond, this is just a perfect drop bar trail flyer. Let's hope you inspire others to get more creative with the Fargo. By all means post it in the long running Fargo thread and show others another idea of what a versatile machine the Fargo can be.
 

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Klydesdale
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N10S said:
Thanks for the feedback GT.

Yeah, I ran that ad for a day and a half, and then realized I was being way to premature. I really feel like I owe it to myself (and to the Fargo) to give it a go. I am very familiar with the high-front center tall head tube style of frame, and really want the purpose-built drop-bar oriented geometry. The Fargo delivers nicely on that front so that was never an issue for me. The construction and materials in the frame and fork are also top-notch, so I am happy with that too. Probably my biggest misgiving with the frameset is feeling guilty that I am not using it for what it was primarily designed for.The first thing that ran through my head was wondering where I can find some lightweight aluminum or plastic bolts to plug all of the braze-on holes with. I never use water bottles anymore and won't ever use a rack on the bike so the extra braze-ons are added weight and entry points for water and muck.

Then I started thinking about how much lighter the bike would be with a different rigid fork that wasn't built for touring with all of the braze-ons. This is what drives me to the point of questioning my choice in buying the Fargo in the first place. :confused: Its not the geometry of the frame at all, its really the inescapable fact thats its more utility oriented and heavier than I would like it to be. I looked hard at the Gryphon too, but its no lighter and although its a nice frame/fork I just could not bring myself to buy a frame with an EBB that I would never use. Short of having a custom frame built for me, the Fargo was the best choice. I realize that the Fargo is never going to be a "lightweight" bike, and I just need to quit thinking about it now that its built, and get some riding in. As long as it handles like I hope it will it should be a great little bike.
I bought my Fargo for similar purposes to yours and don't ever foresee using it for it's stated purpose. I'm very happy I did because it is the best overall handling bike I've ever ridden and that includes the custom rigid, hardtail and FS MTBs I have in my garage. And being able to purchase a frame/fork that fits me so well from my favorite LBS for $800-$900 less than what the least expensive custom one would cost makes me smile every time I ride it.

The unused mounting holes in my fork are plugged with silicone caulk, which I've used with great success in such application on other frames. It seals the threads well and can be easily removed if need be in the future Black or clear caulk is unobtrusive, white not so much. Other things I've seen used for this purpose are melted wax and hot melt glue. I also tried some black nylon bolts I picked up at the local home megawarehouse but did not like the way they looked.
 

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I think people are hitting on what the Fargo is all about. It's versatility.

I love reading the blogs and threads about bikepacking, Tour Divide and all that sort of stuff but in truth me and my Fargo are going to be doing a more limited version of that sort of thing. A few overnighters yeah, and I will definitely tote it off to a few select spots like Cable WI, the Black Hills and some TBD spots but mostly its just going to get duty around here which is going to be some dirt, pavement, gravel and fire roads and anywhere else I can think of. Or see while riding it.

My "goto" bike before was always my cross bike. I'm not a roadie but could use it to ride roads, it could go mildly off road, but couldn't carry anything really. My Rockhopper 29 is a riot but limited overall as well. I needed a "Jeep" sort of bike and I found it. Pretty much like the rest of you.

The Fargo is capable of being most anything we need. I'm pretty sure you'll see some other cool set ups coming besides the 1x9 of this thread. Its why I log in and read this stuff. I can't wait.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Go Kart Motzart said:
Cool bike! What stem are you running?
Its an IRD F4 Mountain riser stem (120mmx30degree). I have used it on several different frames and have had good luck with it. Mine is a 25.4 mm version for my Midges, but they also come in 26.0mm and also now offer a few sizes now in 31.8. Pretty decent stem and lighter than some of the other risers at around 185 grams.

http://www.interlocracing.com/stems.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
klydesdale said:
I bought my Fargo for similar purposes to yours and don't ever foresee using it for it's stated purpose. I'm very happy I did because it is the best overall handling bike I've ever ridden and that includes the custom rigid, hardtail and FS MTBs I have in my garage. And being able to purchase a frame/fork that fits me so well from my favorite LBS for $800-$900 less than what the least expensive custom one would makes me smile every time I ride it.

The unused mounting holes in my fork are plugged with silicone caulk, which I've used with great success in such application on other frames. It seals the threads well and can be easily removed if need be in the future Black or clear caulk is unobtrusive, white not so much. Other things I've seen used for this purpose are melted wax and hot melt glue. I also tried some black nylon bolts I picked up at the local home megawarehouse but did not like the way they looked.
Thanks for the feedback, its nice to know that I am not alone in my singletrack focus with the Fargo! My last drop-bar bike was a Bandersnatch and although it worked pretty well, it wasn't a great handling bike and required a lot of leaning to get through corners. This resulted in me bashing my fingers on a couple of occassions and worse yet hooking the side of my shoulder and literally pulling me off the bike!! I have heard the Fargo is pretty agile when it comes to the steering department so I am excited to see how much better it is (hopefully).

I had read about some folks using silicone and may go that route so thanks for confirming the tip on that one as the Fargo has a boatload of braze-ons!! I ran across a place in the UK that sells these cool little anodized alloy push-in plugs with o-rings that would be a neat option, but definitely more costly than using the readily available (like already on my shelf) silicone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
slocaus said:
I really like this bike! I wondered when I would see the light, simple, single track ride concept of the Fargo. Now I know. Most folks want to load it up and be the vagabond, this is just a perfect drop bar trail flyer. Let's hope you inspire others to get more creative with the Fargo. By all means post it in the long running Fargo thread and show others another idea of what a versatile machine the Fargo can be.
Ocho said:
I think people are hitting on what the Fargo is all about. It's versatility.

I love reading the blogs and threads about bikepacking, Tour Divide and all that sort of stuff but in truth me and my Fargo are going to be doing a more limited version of that sort of thing. A few overnighters yeah, and I will definitely tote it off to a few select spots like Cable WI, the Black Hills and some TBD spots but mostly its just going to get duty around here which is going to be some dirt, pavement, gravel and fire roads and anywhere else I can think of. Or see while riding it.

My "goto" bike before was always my cross bike. I'm not a roadie but could use it to ride roads, it could go mildly off road, but couldn't carry anything really. My Rockhopper 29 is a riot but limited overall as well. I needed a "Jeep" sort of bike and I found it. Pretty much like the rest of you.

The Fargo is capable of being most anything we need. I'm pretty sure you'll see some other cool set ups coming besides the 1x9 of this thread. Its why I log in and read this stuff. I can't wait.
Thanks for the comments guys. Having owned and ridden a few CX bikes in the past, I always loved that versatility and the comfort and power of using the drop bar configuration. My biggest problem with the CX bikes was that I would find myself diving deeper and deeper into rougher trails and found that the conventional CX riding position and the narrower tires were just too confining and limiting for the places I wanted to ride. Once I finally got rid of my CX bike and started riding a drop bar 29er mountain bike the reality of what you can do with drop bars really became evident. My riding buddy rides an Ellsworth Truth and much to his chagrin I am just as fast as he is through most of the singletrack trails here in Missouri. When we get to the flats and the climbs I simply walk away from him.

If I really like the way the bike handles, what I would really like to do is have Walt of Waltworks build a Fargo geometry fork clone with his weight weenie upgrades. I think they weigh somewhere in the 875 gram range which would shave off 300 grams off the stock fork weight which is substantial. Then having a lighter set of wheels built would really optimize the bike for my riding preferences.
 
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