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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Purchased a holdover 2010 Scott CX Team last fall. I'm in it about $1000. I don't race, don't do group rides, just use it to put in long days and getting out in the country. It's a lot of fun albeit heavy, maybe 19 pounds? Twenty? My main focus is mountain biking and I've got a nice small highend collection - 20 pound 29er carbon HT 1x10, rigid SS 29er steel and a new 6" all-mountain carbon - and the pavement riding obviously does wonders for dirt riding.

Now I'm finding the CX bike is being used primarily as a road bike; the cross tires came off for some training road slicks, and the thought of selling it for a dedicated road bike is here. But I've read many "had a road bike, sold it for a cross bike" or "get a nice light road wheelset." My favorite gravel route is now paved, riding the CX on the easier mtb trails is no longer fun/the novelty has worn off (did several time trials over the months and my SS 29er is faster and safer) and I find the geometry and weight a pain in the butt for long steep climbs. For CX racing a 54 would've been ideal but I bought a 56 and it fits nicely. Looks like past road bikes save for the more upright stem and brakes.

Posting this to see if anyone else has gone through the motions. Needs vs wants, new bike-itis, etc. Sold the CX, got a road, regretted it, came back to CX, wasted time and money. Basically a CX is a slack "plush" road bike with different brakes, right? Should I just alter the riding position, slap on some light wheels/tires and call it good?
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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IMHO, you're overworrying this.

I say this as someone who owns a massed start road bike, a road commuter and a 'cross bike. I like being able to keep them set up for their respective jobs.

Ultimately, the big-ticket items in terms of realizing the potential of a road bike are having it fit you correctly, having drop bars, and having road slicks in an appropriate size for what you're doing.

EDIT: Also, clipless pedals if you're interested in riding further or faster. I don't use them on my commuter, though.

There are some other setup differences you can make. But they're pretty major diminishing returns.

Set up the riding position to work for what you're doing with it. If that requires an 80mm or 140mm stem, you probably blew it on size and need to try again. Get some tires you like. I wouldn't bother with the wheels, but I realize that my threshold for bang for the buck to spend my money on something is higher than a lot of people's.

Since you already have slicks on the 'cross bike, you can also just go and test ride some road bikes and see if they're $1000 better. (Really, you're looking at $2000 bikes at retail to compete on the same terms with frame construction and spec.)

There are some other setup things that you might want to play with to make the bike work better on the road. If you're not happy with the brakes, talk to your mechanic about it. And it's not too hard to spin out a 46/11 gear on a descent, or even for a stronger sprinter in the flats.

Basically, I don't think a road bike will be enough better than your 'cross bike, set up well, for you to tell a difference. Let alone a $1000-$2000 difference. But it's not like you have to take my word for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Great input, as usual!
Yes, over-thinking seems to be the MO here.

The bike fits great. Brakes work better than my Avid mechanicals on the SS rigid. Wheels are 2000 gram Alex Race Pro 28 (laugh typing those words in same sentence) and tires are near-400 gram Performance Forte Strada K at around 85psi.

Yep, even on-sale bikes at Performance with good spec will cost me $2000 at a minimum.

Thanks for the objectivity.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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I try not to be too much of an upgrade whore. But nice tires, whether on- or off-road, are one of my little indulgences. Continental GP4000s are my favorite. There are some other nice ones. Price vs. quality is pretty comparable to mountain bike tires. IME, some flat protection is indispensable, but I haven't found one system to be hugely worse than others I've tried. Forte Stradas are basically commute tires. Probably a fine service life, but you should notice a pretty significant difference in how something nicer rolls and grips.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well that was quick and easy. Just purchased a set of 25c GP4000S from PlanetCyclery.com at $87.90 shipped.
 

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Fat-tired Roadie
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LOL. I'll be curious to hear what you think.

Tire pressure for a road bike is by experimentation. There are some charts of weight vs. pressure that can give you some starting points. I use the lowest pressure that doesn't wallow or pinch flat. For me, that's 80 and 95 psi, front and rear, in 23mm tires. I use the same in 25s, but that's because I sometimes have laden panniers on that bike.
 

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Kilted Cyclist
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If weight and geometry are the issues and if you want to ride the bike on pave road only, I would sell it and buy a carbon Road bike.
 
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