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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Help? A friend and I are thinking about doing the SM100 on a tandem next year. We have bnever ridden on a mountain tandem but have done a number of fast group rides on my Trek T1000 road tandem (currently running disc brakes) . I guess we might be able to rent one but I was thinking about temporarily converting my road tanden 700C to a 29er mountain bike. Since I have a 29er single bike I was thinking about using the fox fork and wheel off my mnt bike and seeing what I could put on the rear (tire). I would also hook up flat bars and shifters. in addition I think I could just change to rear right side crank to a mnt arm and gearing.


What are your thoughts? I really don't want to spend the $'s on a mnt tandem when I probably won't ride it much.

:eek: :D
 

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Derailleurless
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You'd probably have better luck fitting 26" wheels and tires to it -- almost certainly at the rear end, but if you run a 26" up front you wouldn't jack up the geometry too much.

But I'm sure there are a whole list of details I'm overlooking. Barring any other responses, take the time to think through any other issues before proceeding. It sounds like a fun conversion.
 

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MTB Tandem Nut
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eischman said:
I weigh ~ 200 and he weighs 165
Having a heavier-than-average plus an average rider racing on a fork and wheel that were designed for one person to use probably isn't the safest approach. Other than possibly offering some great video if the fork fails, I don't really see an upside to that.
Yes, there have been a few teams that have successfully used single-bike forks on their tandems, but those teams have weighed considerably less than you guys do.
In stead, I'd try 26" wheels with bigger tires on your frame (the OD would be pretty close to your 700c wheels), but would offer lots more cush.
Just as you wouldn't put knobbies on a road bike and expect it to be a mountain bike, you won't get great performance or versatiliy from the Trek, I'd check to see what that the different wheels did to the bb height, which will already be very low for riding off-road. It'll handle like a pig in the dirt. But it's cheaper than buying an mtb tandem.
Don't know where you are, but you may find a local team willing to lend you their tandem for the race. You'll find a marked difference in the performance (and probably your results) on a real mountain tandem.
Good luck!
 

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Long Live Long Rides
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Conversion

How technical is the course? If it is very smooth, you could probably get away with the conversion. If it is at all technical you might have problems with several things: Bottom bracket height (I can't imagine trying our road tandem on our local trails), rear hub strength (If the two of you put out much power you will explode a single bike hub), wheel strength (compare the combined team weight with a single rider), and fork strength (See Wheel Strength). I'm not saying don't do it- you know your riding location and style better than I do - but that to have a successful ride you need to have equipment up to the task. I second the idea of trying to borrow a bike that was designed to do what you want. Where are you located?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I live in the raleigh durham, North Carolina. I will check around. The course has a lot of fire road and fire road climbs but also has some downhill single track that is pretty technical at time with a number of drops 1-2 ft and babyhead rocks. Alot of the single track are hiking trails over the mountain

http://www.mtntouring.com/mountain/htm/shenandoah_mountain_100/page_sm100.htm
 
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