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I have set up my Yeti 575 with a new Talas RLC. Can anyone provide, send, or direct me to an easy, laymans guide/instructions for setting up and customizing the ride? Thank you.
 

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ggils said:
I have set up my Yeti 575 with a new Talas RLC. Can anyone provide, send, or direct me to an easy, laymans guide/instructions for setting up and customizing the ride? Thank you.
Try the fox website- (http://www.foxracingshox.com/BackOffice/UploadedFiles/OwnersManual/forx_en05.pdf)

Try thier suggested air pressure for your weight and fine tune it from there. The red knob on top of the right leg is for rebound. You want it just slow enough that the fork doesn't "buck" back up at you. The blue dial on bottom is for low speed compression. This is to slow the compression in the first part of it's stroke. It's a personal preference setting. The blue lever is the lock -out lever. pull it toward you, and it stops the fork from moving up & down. The blue knob on the bottom of the right leg is the lock-out blow-off knob. The position of it determines how much force it requires to activate the fork when you have it in the locked out position.
 

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Struggling with terms...

Thank you for the reply. I am fairly new to mountain biking and really love it. I also love this forum and the helpful people here. My struggles are with the terms...I certainly understand the "dictionary" terms but am not really sure how the ride is effected by adjusting the rebound, or compression, etc. I am trying to educate myself, but the Fox manual seems to assume a level of understanding that I don't have. I always considered myself dumber than most, so this could certainly fall in that category :)
 

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ggils said:
Thank you for the reply. I am fairly new to mountain biking and really love it. I also love this forum and the helpful people here. My struggles are with the terms...I certainly understand the "dictionary" terms but am not really sure how the ride is effected by adjusting the rebound, or compression, etc. I am trying to educate myself, but the Fox manual seems to assume a level of understanding that I don't have. I always considered myself dumber than most, so this could certainly fall in that category :)
First use the provided shock pump to setup the preload (how far the suspension compresses when you sit on the bike). You want this to be about 25-30% of total travel typically. Measure the gold stanchions on the fork and then do the math to figure out how long 25-30% of the total length is. That is what you want exposed when you are sitting on the bike. Add/remove air till you get in this range.

The RLC is Rebound, Lockout and Compression

Rebound - this is how fast the shock returns after it compresses. Seems like there are 12 or 13 clicks of rebound. Set it at 6 or 7 then go ride it. If the fork isn't returning to normal height after hitting a bump quick enough, add another click or two of rebound. Too fast rebound can make the fork feel very springy, almost like its deflecting of obstacles.

Compression - Compression helps you set up how much force it takes before the shock begins to compress. I'd set this in the middle initially and then ride. If you find the shock "diving" when you get on the brakes hard, then add a click or two of compression and repeat the process.

Lockout - Basically turns the fork into a pseudo-rigid. The fork will be tough to compress and will not react well to bumps. There is a small blue dial at the bottom of the fork leg that will adjust how much of an impact it takes before the lockout is overcome. Most of the time, unless you are riding on the road you'll probably just leave the lockout off.

The most important thing is getting the preload setup right with the shock pump. The rest are things you can play with on the trail as you get a feel for the shock and what the settings do. Don't try to adjust rebound & compression at the same time, do them individually and try and see how the adjustments affect the ride.
 

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Amphibious Technologies
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ggils said:
Thank you for the reply. I am fairly new to mountain biking and really love it. I also love this forum and the helpful people here. My struggles are with the terms...I certainly understand the "dictionary" terms but am not really sure how the ride is effected by adjusting the rebound, or compression, etc. I am trying to educate myself, but the Fox manual seems to assume a level of understanding that I don't have. I always considered myself dumber than most, so this could certainly fall in that category :)
Get a copy of Fundamentals Video http://www.sportsflicks.com/DVDinfo/mountainbike/fundamentals.htm . It'll show you basic riding techniques, suspension set-up, bike assembly and more.

In a nutshell: the more rebound damping you use the slower the shock returns after compressing. If you use too much, the shock or fork tend to pack down and you will end up with a harsh ride specially when going through braking bumps. Compression damping on the other hand controls how fast/slow a shock or fork compresses at a given load or impact, one would normally run as little compression adjustment as one can get away with. Run the compression fully open and if you notice any brake dive then add compress one click at a time until you get rid of it or until just before the ride gets harsh (you loose small bump sensitivity the more compression damping you use).
 

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Jdub said:
First use the provided shock pump to setup the preload (how far the suspension compresses when you sit on the bike). You want this to be about 25-30% of total travel typically. Measure the gold stanchions on the fork and then do the math to figure out how long 25-30% of the total length is. That is what you want exposed when you are sitting on the bike. Add/remove air till you get in this range.

The RLC is Rebound, Lockout and Compression

Rebound - this is how fast the shock returns after it compresses. Seems like there are 12 or 13 clicks of rebound. Set it at 6 or 7 then go ride it. If the fork isn't returning to normal height after hitting a bump quick enough, add another click or two of rebound. Too fast rebound can make the fork feel very springy, almost like its deflecting of obstacles.

Compression - Compression helps you set up how much force it takes before the shock begins to compress. I'd set this in the middle initially and then ride. If you find the shock "diving" when you get on the brakes hard, then add a click or two of compression and repeat the process.

Lockout - Basically turns the fork into a pseudo-rigid. The fork will be tough to compress and will not react well to bumps. There is a small blue dial at the bottom of the fork leg that will adjust how much of an impact it takes before the lockout is overcome. Most of the time, unless you are riding on the road you'll probably just leave the lockout off.

The most important thing is getting the preload setup right with the shock pump. The rest are things you can play with on the trail as you get a feel for the shock and what the settings do. Don't try to adjust rebound & compression at the same time, do them individually and try and see how the adjustments affect the ride.
To avoid confusion when reading setup guides, where "preload" is mentioned in the above post, the correct term is actually "sag". Preload is a term relating more to the setup of coil springs - where they are often "preloaded" against the rebound stop to set the desired "sag". Just to be clear, "sag" is the amount the fork or rear shock compresses when you sit on the bike. Sag is usually expressed as a percentage of the total fork or shock travel.

Your fork has an air spring and the pressure you add with your shock pump controls the "spring rate". Increasing air pressure will make the fork stiffer and reduce "sag". As mentioned, this is the most important setting to get right first.

Damping controls the speed of the fork's movement. "Compression damping" controls the speed of the downward stroke of the fork and "Rebound damping" controls the upward or recovery stroke. Damping is a resistive force which varies with the speed of fork movement - which is why people often refer to low or high speed damping.

After setting the correct sag with the air spring pressure (say 25% as a starting point), set both the rebound and compression damping to minimum. If the fork kicks or bucks back too much after hitting bumps, increase the rebound damping first. If you go too far, the fork will start to pack down and feel very slow and harsh. When you are happy with the rebound setting, then finally start to dial in the compression damping to give increased support under heavy braking and steep downhills. If you find the fork dives too quickly in these situations, then try increasing the compression damping a little at a time.

Easy really!!
 

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uktrailmonster said:
To avoid confusion when reading setup guides, where "preload" is mentioned in the above post, the correct term is actually "sag". Preload is a term relating more to the setup of coil springs - where they are often "preloaded" against the rebound stop to set the desired "sag". Just to be clear, "sag" is the amount the fork or rear shock compresses when you sit on the bike. Sag is usually expressed as a percentage of the total fork or shock travel.
Good point. I spent too many years in motocross and on coil forks. I actually run a TALAS as well, but its my first air fork and I've only had it for 3 months, so maybe I can break that habit eventually...
 

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Just go with

ggils said:
I have set up my Yeti 575 with a new Talas RLC. Can anyone provide, send, or direct me to an easy, laymans guide/instructions for setting up and customizing the ride? Thank you.
setting the fork and rear shock with 25% sag (thats 25% of the fork/rearshocks stroke). And then set the rebound on the fork and rear shock at half way. This will get you going..
 

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Amphibious Technologies
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uktrailmonster said:
To avoid confusion when reading setup guides, where "preload" is mentioned in the above post, the correct term is actually "sag". Preload is a term relating more to the setup of coil springs - where they are often "preloaded" against the rebound stop to set the desired "sag". Just to be clear, "sag" is the amount the fork or rear shock compresses when you sit on the bike. Sag is usually expressed as a percentage of the total fork or shock travel.

Your fork has an air spring and the pressure you add with your shock pump controls the "spring rate". Increasing air pressure will make the fork stiffer and reduce "sag". As mentioned, this is the most important setting to get right first.

Damping controls the speed of the fork's movement. "Compression damping" controls the speed of the downward stroke of the fork and "Rebound damping" controls the upward or recovery stroke. Damping is a resistive force which varies with the speed of fork movement - which is why people often refer to low or high speed damping.

After setting the correct sag with the air spring pressure (say 25% as a starting point), set both the rebound and compression damping to minimum. If the fork kicks or bucks back too much after hitting bumps, increase the rebound damping first. If you go too far, the fork will start to pack down and feel very slow and harsh. When you are happy with the rebound setting, then finally start to dial in the compression damping to give increased support under heavy braking and steep downhills. If you find the fork dives too quickly in these situations, then try increasing the compression damping a little at a time.

Easy really!!
Very well said! I would, however, set the rebound at the middle setting and not fully open to begin with and adjust from there. The middle setting for the TALAS ussually gets you in the ballpark of the sweetspot for rebound damping. If it was a Zoke, on the other hand, I'd start from the fully open position.
 
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